At AMUN Black Lives Matter

Position Papers by Committee

Position paper for General Assembly Third Committee


Country:Afghanistan
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racism and xenophobia are a threat to every world community if not properly remedied. Considering the civil war in 1992, Afghanistan has dealt firsthand with the division of their citizens based on ethnicity. As representatives for the newly sovereign government in Afghanistan, we maintain the UN’s stance on seeking to end xenophobia and racism globally. Amidst many external claims of mistreatment of minority groups within Afghanistan, the Taliban government wishes to reassure the world community of our continual effort to supply minority ethnic groups within our nation with the utmost opportunities for safety and success. The Hazara population has historically been a target for ethnic discrimination and therefore has under this new administration received promises of protection and security. While locally, many leaders have continued actions against the Hazara population, the national government has issued condemnation and repercussions for their actions. For Afghanistan to properly address the matter of racism and xenophobia at home, they will need the utmost support from the United Nations. The first point of action that Afghanistan requests from the United Nations is legitimate recognition from global community. International recognition and support will allow Afghanistan to continue building a government with adequate power to help protect its minority groups. Furthermore, the government in Afghanistan is seeking soothe regional xenophobic and racial tensions. First, this can be completed by the effective removal of all remaining American personnel who are attempting to leave the nation. Secondly, by constructing an economically sound Afghanistan, connections between neighboring nations could help build the incentives needed to quell xenophobic and racial unrest in Central Asia.

Country:Afghanistan
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
A key impact that results from armed conflict is consistently the displacement and creation of refugee status for those who find themselves amidst bloody warfare. For decades the United Nations has resolved and assisted in the support for those displaced. In nations that live in constant states of warfare many of their citizens do not return and maintain their refugee status for long periods of time. Furthermore, drastic environmental changes are projected to cause many vulnerable people to be forced from their homeland. Within the next several years, severe attention and care must be brought to the issue of those who are or will be displaced from their homelands. As a nation that has faced many of the same obstacles for decades, Afghanistan will maintain full support within the United Nations to those displaced, given refugee status, or seeking a return to their homeland.

Country:Argentina
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance is a matter of great concern for all countries. This elimination is concurrent with the fundamental human rights provided to all people. Recent events such as racialized police brutality and the related Black Lives Matter movement have brought this topic to our immediate attention as something that needs to be addressed. Our nation is committed to continuous work at eliminating this problem in our country. We plan to follow the guidelines set by the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action (DDPA) in the World Conference Against Racism in 2001 and the UN resolution A/73/587 from 2018. Relating to the DDPA, our government takes responsibility for eliminating racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance within Argentina. We will continue to address: discrimination within health, employment, policing, and education; create equal opportunities for all people; educate the population and increase awareness of racial discrimination and related topics, especially within work and school environments; and provide effective compensation, remedies, and recourse to victims of, racial discrimination, xenophobic, and related intolerance. Our nation is especially committed to education and awareness, as we see it as an important and effective method to eliminating racial intolerance in Argentina. We strongly encourage all other countries within the United Nations to continue adopting the DDPA’s action plan, especially the sector relating to education and awareness, and continue to protect the fundamental human rights of its citizens.

Country:Argentina
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Dislocated persons of pan-Africa have been on the rise in recent years, due to reasons such as armed conflict, human trafficking, economic recession, and/or environmental deterioration. The African Union, consisting of 55 member states, was created to promote and protect the rights of refugees, returnees, and displaced persons in sub-Saharan Africa. However, even with 31 out of the 55 African States ratifying the Kampala Convention, which addresses the immediate and root causes of internal displacement, there are upwards of twenty-five million internally displaced persons largely due to internal conflict. Argentina affirms Resolution 75/164 of 23 December 2020 which encourages African States who have not yet ratified the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons to do so as early as possible to ensure widespread implementation. We recognize that the women and children among refugees, returnees, and displaced persons have further vulnerability to discrimination, abuse, violence, and exploitation. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees has highlighted that mobility is potentially a tool of protection for refugees, and Argentina supports that position. We have seen success with the implementation of the Solidarity Resettlement Programme, which is a regional programme that ensures security and free access to education and health services for settles refugees, and Patria Grande, which guarantees mobility, access to work and education, and a first step to permanent residency for migrants of neighboring countries.

Country:Australia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racial discrimination is a serious issue not only in Australia, but around the world. As Australian ambassador to the UN, Sally Mansfield said, “This problem does not belong to any one country, it is a problem around the world”As a colonialized nation built on the historical discrimination of aboriginal peoples, we acknowledge our past injustices towards them. Therefore, we acknowledge the debt still owed to these peoples for making Australia the strong and diverse nation it is today. We as a country have started to repay this debt in a variety of forms. For example, the Australian government has paid $280 million USD in reparations to aboriginals who were actively removed from their families in federally controlled areas during the first half of the 20th century, in an attempt to erase their rich native culture. We, as the delegates of The Commonwealth of Australia, noting our country’s past research and current discourse, strongly advocate for the establishment of a national legislative seat(s) dedicated to the representation of historically discriminated indigenous peoples across the globe. We also strongly encourage expanded reparations funds for indigienous peoples who have faced historical discrimiantion, and still are facing it today.

Country:Australia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The African refugee crisis is one of the preeminent humanitarian crises facing our world today. As a formerly colonized land, The Commonwealth of Australia calls upon the contributions of former colonizers to assist in absolving the ongoing struggles of generationally displaced peoples. In the model of Australia’s National Council to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children, we call upon this body to establish a similar council focused on women and children who have become refugees or displaced persons in Africa, as they face violence and discrimiantion every day. We believe this council will improve quality of life for refugees and displaced people while a more permanent place of citizenship is secured for them.

Country:Austria
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The presence of racism, discrimination, and all other forms of prejudice is an obstacle the United Nations has worked tirelessly to confront. Correspondingly, the International Community has witnessed an increase in instances of anti-minority protests, discrimination, and prejudicially informed violence. These instances include, inter alia, police violence against racial minorities, xenophobic attacks on refugees and ethnic minorities, hostilities against religious minorities, and generalized hatred against marginalized groups. These dilemmas lend themselves to institutional failures as well, namely disparities in access to resources, income, and inequities in the health sector. During the COVID-19 pandemic, these institutional effects have been exacerbated, making this situation even more salient. Austria affirms the United Nations’ position to condemn all forms of racism, discrimination, and related intolerance and supports its mission to actively combat it. As a member party to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, we will continue to enforce this agreement within our domestic policy and advocate for its effective implementation globally. Furthermore, we believe that the United Nations mission can only be achieved via a multilateral approach and through concrete measures. We believe that this is best done through raising awareness, offering educational material, and creating material for sensitivity training. We will support resolutions that promote equal treatment for all and encourage integration. Austria is not naïve to the fact there will be Member States whose priorities do not lie with multilateralism. We expect to be met with differing opinions from Member States who believe there are alternative measures the United Nations should take to address this issue. Notwithstanding, we will continue to cooperate with all Member States, regardless of their willingness to form alliances. Moreover, we are determined to assist in the facilitation of a thoughtful and constructive dialogue regarding this matter.

Country:Austria
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As the international community faces rising number of refugees, returnees, displaced persons, and COVID-19 struggles, the United Nations must work to find solutions. Common occurrences consist of the struggle to access natural resources, due to natural disasters and climate change. Hazards resulting from the increasing intensity and frequency of extreme weather events, such as abnormally heavy rainfall, prolonged droughts, desertification, environmental degradation, or sea-level rise and cyclones are already causing an average of more than 20 million people to leave their homes and move to other areas in their countries each year. Austria emphasizes the United Nations’ objective on strengthening human rights and the rule of law. The protection of civilians in armed conflict is an added concern that must be raised. Displaced persons, refugees, and returnees are at greater risk being victims of armed conflict. Our main goals relate closely to that of the General Assembly Agenda Item 60 resolution in the seventy first session. Though we appreciate the efforts of Member States in the past, there is still work to be done. We seek specific resolutions that offer resettlement opportunities, protection of refugees, voluntary return, local integration, and most importantly, addressing the root causes of the displacement problem. Austria would like to stress that to solve this issue we must work not to just aid refugees, but also work for re-integration. By re-integrating, we can ensure that those affected can avoid future displacement, seek employment, and be protected from future conflict. Austria continues to be interested in resolutions that work to put an end to human trafficking, and sexual abuse. Refugees, displaced persons, are at a higher risk of being victims of sexual abuse, and human trafficking. As the Third Committee, we stay committed to protecting victims of sexual abuse and putting a stop to it. We believe that through funding the United Nations’ and member states, these goals can also be achieved.

Country:Bahrain
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The government of Bahrain recognizes and acknowledges the significance of internationally taking action to protect victims of racial and ethnic discrimination. We acknowledge and bring awareness to the racism issue at hand. Additionally, internationally we encourage states to take action against hate speech, train their police forces, encourage diversity, recognize the importance of education, and prohibit the promotion of racial discrimination by the state. We believe we need to internationally address this issue by passing the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action by urging Western powers to vote ‘yes’ on this resolution. In order to ensure economic, social, and political opportunities we can ensure that member states allow for high levels of education among all races and ethnicities. With increased education there is more opportunity for growth among citizens. This gives them the opportunity to access such economic opportunities, which in turn will give them social and political power. Additionally, we need to combat the detrimental effects of poverty within our society. One way we can combat poverty is through high levels of education, which can also help eliminate racism and discrimination.
Lastly, we want to remind the international community that we strongly believe in our right and everyone’s right to a sovereign nation with their own legitimate legal system. We hope the UN will continue to recognize this sovereignty by allowing states to make their own decisions regarding the criminal justice system within their state. This is rooted in our strong belief in the death penalty and our authority to use it. We will push for resolutions that support our position on sovereignty and we hope the UN will keep prioritizing sovereignty.

Country:Bahrain
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The government of Bahrain accepts the importance of expanding protections of refugees from Africa. The resolution A/C.3/75/L.46 was passed by consensus to encourage assistance to refugees and displaced peoples of Africa internationally by emphasizing a holistic approach to the population movement. Although we will try to support the refugees in any way possible, we also regret the abundance of refugees and are concerned with the number of them coming from Africa. Many of the members of the Internally Displaced People (IDP) and refugees are children and because of this we take great concern to this issue. We are also appreciative of the African States, who continue to host refugees and support them with their limited resources.
The most important steps we can take to circumvent the issue is to resolve the ongoing conflict within the African region and provide a humanitarian response to the states in need. The action the United Nations should take is to provide mediation efforts within the region to mitigate the conflict and stop the enormous flux of refugees from the area. In order to fix the root of the issue we need to address the instability in Africa and find a solution to the IDP’s and refugees within the region. We can get to the root of this issue by working to expand existing protection. We believe the United Nations should call on regional organizations to strengthen and revitalize partnerships in order to protect refugees. Additionally, the United Nations should increase emergency response and coordination of humanitarian assistance. With this, we need to urge member states in Africa to take necessary measures to protect against humanitarian crises and deter crimes against humanity within their respective countries. With United Nations assistance, we believe we can repair the region and work toward having fewer refugees one year at a time.

Country:Bangladesh
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Some families of Rohingya, understandably, want to return to Burma after spending years in camps in Bangladesh, but conditions in the city of Arakan that they have fled from have not improved significantly. The majority of Rohingya are considered to be "resident foreigners" by the Burmese authorities, not citizens, although they are allowed to live in the country. This absence of full rights of citizenship leads Rohingya to other abuses, such as restrictions on their free movement, discriminatory restrictions on access to education and arbitrary confiscation. Rejecting citizenship and the rights it entails inevitably creating serious obstacles to achieving a lasting solution to the flows of refugees.
The refugees have been recognized and permitted to enter Bangladesh. Bangladesh simply degrades Rohingya as foreigners but has still set up camps to make room for them. Almost 20,000 Rohingya refugees have been moved into remote Bangladesh without adequate medical care, livelihoods, or protection. Many refugees have been transferred without full, informed consent and prevented from returning to mainland France by the authorities. Bangladeshi authorities provided these refugees with no form of citizenship, but citizenship is granted for the process itself for years. The island is at risk of high winds and floods with the monsoon season due to start in June. Blocks around the island are probably still insufficient to resist a three- category storm. The Government states that there are sufficient storm shelters, but there is a risk, as sea or air transport are limited in the unfair weather, of refugees, security personnel and humanitarian workers being squeezed on the island at the end of the journey.
The country of Bangladesh, along with support from neighboring countries, proposes the solution of proper citizenship acknowledgment for the Rohingya in Myanmar. The 1982 Citizenship Law, as mentioned before, continues to push refugees into Bangladesh due to the retainment of citizenship. A recent statement published the National Unity Government (NGU) presents Myanmar with the idea of rewriting their constitution and stripping away the 1982 Citizenship Law. This claim would allow for the Rohingya to receive proper identification, which would push the need for proper housing, education, healthcare, food, and sanitation, all basic necessities that they lack both in Myanmar and Bangladesh. This new law suggested by the NGU would “base citizenship on birth in Myanmar or birth anywhere as a child of Myanmar Citizens” and permit the Rohingya to “democratic federal principles” (“NUG Releases Statement Recognising Rohingyas’ Right to Citizenship”). Through this revision, Bangladesh could reduce the level of refugees which currently causes overcrowding and allow for better acceptance of the group both in Bangladesh and Myanmar.
http://nhrc.portal.gov.bd/sites/default/files/files/nhrc.portal.gov.bd/page/e1ba516f_6ab9_4f5b_a d8c_bc02ac5de721/Speech%20of%20Hon%27ble%20Chairperson%20in%20IOC.pdf
https://www.myanmar-now.org/en/news/nug-releases-statement-recognising-rohingyas-right-to- citizenship
https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/06/07/bangladesh-rohingya-refugees-island-fear-monsoon

Country:Bangladesh
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The country of Bangladesh has long faced a refugee crisis involving the migration of the Rohingya from Myanmar. For decades, the Rohingya have experienced both ethnic and religious persecution from Myanmar after being stripped of their freedoms and citizenship. Hundreds upon thousands flock to refugee camps, mainly among the Cox’s Bazar within Bangladesh, to escape such harsh conditions. Since 2018, over 1.1 million refugees now reside within Bangladesh. The country of Bangladesh believes in instituting a refugee compact in order to help combat the crisis.
Almost 890,000 Rohingya refugees live in the Bangladeh Cox Bazar area in Kutupalong and Nayapara refugee camps – the world's largest and most populous. Six Rohingyah refugees were devastated and killed by fatal monsoon rains from the Cox Bazar area of Bangladesh in late July 2021 and more than 21,000 were hit. It is estimated that 3,800 refugees and 13,000 refugees were temporarily forced to relocate. In crowded camps where there is no proper sanitary and water supplies for children and elderly, the rainy season also aggravates the risk of diseases such as hepatitis, malaria, dengue and chikungunya. Bangladesh has slowly progressed in aiding refugees; however, the country falls short in providing proper care and resources, as well as disposing the money originally sent for the camps. Governmental authorities continue to violate basic human rights as they deny refugees access to food and water, sanitation, education, healthcare, and the internet. Along with this, many are beaten or refused contact with their families.
A compact refugee is a promising way to save the refugees of Rohingya and Bangladeshi. Through a political route, refugees can contribute to their host countries. A compact for refugees would bring together the host government and international communities' multiannual commitments in support of inclusive growth and opportunity for refugees and host communities. The compact approach of Bangladesh and the partners should be considered, and three ambitious ideas will be included: EU trade concessions, opportunities for migrant workers and partnerships with China and the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank. All of them extend beyond subsidies, which are decreased further by other public and private flows.

Country:Belgium
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
As Belgium we agree that there should be an elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and other related intolerances. Due to the tragic death of George Floyd and many others, our Federal Public Service is creating strict policies and implementations in attempts to strike down on any racial injustices occurring within our country. Another addition that should be included in Belgian policy is the implementation of education on the history of racial intolerance in our country in attempts to keep the country from repeating past actions. Although we have a negative past with racial injustices along with many European countries, we are making great progress in advocating and giving back to minorities and educating our citizens so that we are moving forward as equal people and we do not repeat past mistakes.

Country:Belgium
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Belgium, along with many other European countries are trying to increase the number of refugees taken in per year. Especially for those trying to escape Afghanistan, we are trying to increase the number of refugees taken in per year to help those in need. According to the General Commission for Refugees and Stateless Persons in Belgium, we are accepting 20% more refugees in comparison to previous years. We not only are accepting new refugees, but we are also giving money to the Red Cross and many other committees that are dedicated to helping the refugees. Giving education and mental health resources is also a vital aspect to how we are trying to assist the refugees around the country. Although in current days, Afghanistan is a serious threat to many around the world, we are doing our best to help assist those in need and those trying to flee the country to seek safety.

Country:Bolivia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
At the fall of our country’s first Indigenous President, backlash relating to racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and any other related intolerance has now begun. As one of the top Latin American countries with a high Indigenous population, we are concerned for their safety. As stated in the Declaration on Race and Racial Prejudice adopted by the United Nations in 1978, any harmful acts, including violence against the indigenous communities or any minority group within any region, will not be tolerated. Bolivia supports the use of the judiciary systems to hold the state/leaders accountable who partake in these acts. We are aware as a state that we are also a part of the problem, therefore we support the efforts to internally reeducate the population on the topic of racism, as well as dissolve the Eurocentric agenda that has been adopted long ago. Bolivia is also in favor of impeaching any present governing body that pushes racist agendas and or any related intolerance. Finally, we support any resolution that allows for the impacted communities to peacefully protest against a governing body if the issues of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and any other related intolerance are still not being addressed.

Country:Bolivia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The growing refugee crisis in Africa is a pertinent issue for this body and Bolivia stands firmly behind the position to assist and aid all refugees, returnees and displaced persons. The number of refugees and displaced persons continues to increase every year due to war and conflict, famine, poverty, and climate change. Last year, Uganda held almost 1.4 million refugees in its borders while neighboring countries such as Sudan and Ethiopia supported close to 800,000 refugees. Bolivia is committed to assisting refugees whenever possible and has been a party to both the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless People. We support the UNHCR in their efforts to aid refugees in Africa and urge our fellow countries to back any UNHCR endeavors to end the refugee crisis. Bolivia has taken many steps to help the refugees housed in its own borders including implementing a resolution to simplify the procedures of the naturalization process for refugees and displaced persons. Building a more effective application and review process for refugees will allow for faster integration into society and lessen the burden of the host country to care for the refugees. Bolivia encourages all countries that support refugees to create a simplified procedure for naturalization in their countries. Safety and security is a human right and no person should be persecuted from their home country. This body must make it a priority to not only assist refugees in the aftermath of their displacement but eradicate the root causes of displacement to begin with. By doing so we can work towards a better and safer future where all people may prosper in their country of origin.

Country:Cambodia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The delegation of Cambodia is committed to the elimination of xenophobia and racial intolerance within our borders. Cambodia recognizes the social movements championing racial and ethnic tolerance seen across the world in 2021 and in prior years. There is a clear disparity in the rights and freedoms given to certain groups or peoples in countries across the world. In many countries, there are no strong laws or policies in place to protect minority groups. Cambodia has a vast population of ethnic minorities with 24 different minority groups across the country, many of which are indigenous. Cambodia will continue to protect these groups and disavow racism against them by passing laws and policies. The Kingdom of Cambodia has also previously worked with the United Nations Refugee Agency to grant refugee status to people of Vietnamese origins, which affects up to one million people within the territorial borders of Cambodia. While Cambodia has made these efforts to eliminate racial intolerance and xenophobia, the Kingdom of Cambodia does not want to erase the ethnic, racial, and religious origins of the people that reside within its borders. Without ignoring the rights already granted to the refugees and indigenous peoples within Cambodia, we also want to recognize one of the main principles incorporated into Cambodian national legislation, which includes the freedom of expression. The Kingdom of Cambodia is committed to enacting national-level policies and establishing a barrier of national sovereignty within Cambodian policy to better deal with issues of racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia.

Country:Cambodia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The Kingdom of Cambodia acknowledges the need to assist refugees, returnees, and displaced persons within Africa. Cambodia also acknowledges the importance of settling refugees, returnees, and displaced persons, and the stability it can bring to the continent of Africa. Many African nations have dealt with or are currently dealing with economic hardship and civil unrest, thus the need to assist refugees and displaced persons across the continent. The Kingdom of Cambodia has previously received assistance from the UN and other nations through UN peacekeeping missions, and recognizes the great impact that peacekeeping missions can have. Cambodia has previously shown its commitment to contributing to global efforts to maintain peace and security through its participation in UN peacekeeping missions, allowing Cambodian troops to be dispatched in Africa and around the globe. Since 2012, Cambodian troops have been stationed in Sudan, assisting with several humanitarian and security crises. Cambodian troops have also been dispatched to several other African countries. Cambodia welcomes a friendship and alliance with nations across the African continent, and is committed to contributing to the effort to assist potential African allies with displaced persons and refugees. The Kingdom of Cambodia accepts the opportunity to give back to the global community by way of military assistance, and through UN peacekeeping initiatives.

Country:Canada
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racism and xenophobia are among the most pervasive evils in the modern world. The United Nations, first and foremost, believes in the fundamental equality between all people, regardless of their demographic characteristics. Canada also espouses this view, and though we still face our challenges, we are proud that our government has taken resolute steps to combat discrimination within our country.
The voice of these minority groups is also indispensable in discussions of their protection. The involvement of leaders of both formal and informal conglomerations of ethnic and cultural minority groups in discussion of legislation and services can be negotiated to best inform legislators on the particular needs of these groups.
Through federal legislation, the government of Canada has enacted a multitude of reforms which seek to uproot discrimination of all kinds from different sources, including in the workspace, the government, and in daily life. We believe that discrimination has no easy solution, but one place where we can start is in encouraging nations to draft legislation which provides basic protections against abuses that violate the dignity of minorities. This can be accomplished by working with government leaders and providing legal assistance to help them draft legislation that can stand up against legal challenges and loopholes.

Country:Canada
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Colonialism has a long and storied history on the African continent. The knockdown effects of colonialism and the subsequent division of Africa into countries bearing no resemblance to historical borders has led to near constant conflict between nations.
It must be the responsibility of previous colonial powers to help those nations struggling with the effects of colonialism confront their refugee situations.

Country:China
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
In the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic, the mistreatment and racism toward the Chinese people living in diaspora has peaked to new levels. The attacks on people of Chinese and other Asian descent in other countries for example the United States has created an increased awareness to the global community on the racism towards Asian peoples that has heightened due to the pandemic. The People’s Republic of China condemns all forms and actions of racism. The Chinese government is taking strong measures to ensure a good quality of life for all Chinese people despite ethnic or regional differences. Furthermore we actively participate in international discussion and tangible action as a member of the United Nations in the goal of preventing and elimating any forms of racism, discrimination and xenophobia and intolerance on a international scale.

Country:China
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
We, the People’s Republic of China, believe that the dislocation of the peoples in African countries has continued to be a serious issue. As of 2019, 33.4 million persons in sub-Saharan Africa have been displaced. China strongly supports voluntary returns, as mentioned in the Assistance to Refugees, Returnees and Displaced persons in Africa of 2020. By focusing on creating housing and livelihood opportunities in the displaced persons’ home country, China wishes to create ample opportunities for displaced persons returning. The People’s Republic of China also supports the full implementation of the 1969 Organization of African Unity convention. As of 2020, only 46 African countries have ratified the convention, and implementation still has much to be desired. Lastly, we support decisive actions in regards to climate change in order to prevent the future displacement of African persons. Climate change is the cause of many displacements throughout the continent, and with China’s commitment to become carbon neutral, China calls on the United Nations to take decisive action with climate change.

Country:Colombia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Colombia has faced various challenges due to the many years of armed conflict that has caused Afro Colombians in particular to suffer numerous human rights and international law violations, drug trafficking violence, and territorial dispossession. Although the Colombian government has made progress implementing the 2016 peace accords with the FARC guerrilla group, the impact of the conflict on civilians has increased. Colombia recognizes these heinous acts and seeks protection, prevention, and humanitarian assistance. Colombia respects previous efforts made to combat this crisis such as our 1991 Constitutional reforms that helped to give Afro Colombians and Indigenous groups some territorial autonomy, as well as Member States that have implemented laws and other political, social and economic policies that prohibit racial discrimination and related intolerance for people of African descent. Colombia also expresses its appreciation for the efforts made by this body, specifically A/RES/75/237 and A/75/476. Colombia allows victims of human rights violations to be compensated through equal access to justice, including legal assistance when appropriate, and protection remedies such as reparation or satisfaction for any damage suffered as a result of such discrimination, following the norms of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. The State will also uphold the Colombian Peace-building Priority Plan (PPP) signed in September 2017 that focuses on comprehensive stabilization and reintegration interventions, including actions to accelerate the establishment and operation of the comprehensive system for truth, justice, reparations and non-recurrence. Colombia is determined to address these issues to promote a future in which all Colombians, including minorities, will have equal access to opportunities to live a better quality of life. These solutions will benefit Colombia and other States within the international community as a whole.

Country:Colombia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The African continent faces the challenge of internally displaced persons and hosts more than 26 percent of the world refugee population, according to the UNHCR. This number has increased due to continuing conflicts within the Central African Republic, South Sudan and Nigeria. Colombia has also felt the impact of this issue due to the large number of IDPs within its borders, and the increase of refugees caused by the recent economic and political crisis in Venezuela. The risk of sexual and gender-based violence targeting displaced populations and famine among displaced in Ethiopia’s Tigray region is of utmost importance, and Colombia encourages other Member States and the international community to address the specific problems of conflict in Africa and other regions that lead to forced migration. Resolution A/RES/74/130 of 18 December 2019 highlights the UNHCR report on the need for African and other states, along with the United Nations, to work together to create multi-year strategies to ensure adequate protection and assistance for refugees, returnees and displaced persons and to prevent and reduce displacement. This also involves the assistance of the Special Rapporteur of the Human Rights Council on the human rights of internally displaced persons, to work with IGOs and NGOs toward long-term strategies for assistance of refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa. Colombia believes that this body must create a better emergency plan to be able to respond more quickly to the humanitarian crises in the region through the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs that will require a coordinated, system-wide approach. Doing so will improve the lives of many refugees, returnees, and displaced persons.

Country:Costa Rica
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The members of Costa Rica are in alliance with the victims of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance due to generations of cultural predjudice. In commitment to this mission, we are proactively and systematically reviewing and changing long-standing practices and policies. Equal opportunities for all races requires first fair and inclusive decision-making processes, like with the elimination of barriers to political participation. Importantly, these improvements strengthen the foundations of democracy. Within Costa Rica’s participation with OHCHR, our government has formalized its dialogue with representatives of indigenous peoples over public policy, national development plans, territorial security, governance and governability, and laws for autonomous development of indigenous people. Also, along with Ms. Baroud, Permanent Representative of Chad to the United Nations in New York, Mr. Zeledón, Permanent Representative of Costa-Rica, is a co- facilitator appointed to define the procedural aspects of the Permanent Forum on People of African Descent. This is in accordance with the 2020 resolution 75/237 for, "A global call for concrete action for the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action procedural aspects of the Permanent Forum on People of African Descent.” The actions taken in the past year to address these issues must be continued, including the development and implementation of the first Dialogue mechanism with indigenous peoples and processes for the construction of public policies for historically excluded populations. Also, providing support for mixed migratory flows and a coordinated and strategic national response and the development of an Immediate Response Plan for this population in critical care areas. Monetary support is also needed to support the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, improve Costa Rican institutions' efficiency, and to equitably improve the rights of all people.

Country:Costa Rica
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Costa Rica, a diverse and flourishing nation, has come a long way with our human rights initiatives and are working to further it as we move further into the future. As members of Costa Rica, in reference to the influx of refugees, asylum seekers, and displaced persons, we hope to foster a nation bearing the tolerance and equity for individuals seeking assistance. We have had a long history of providing assistance to refugees and asylum seekers, but due to the significant increase in refugees and asylum seekers, namely those from Nicaragua and Venezuela, several problems have surfaced. To emphasize our resolve to combat any growing concern in relations to refugees, Costa Rica, along with several other countries within our region, has taken part in UNHCR’s Global Compact on Refugees. Costa Rica has committed to adopting and implementing national action plans aligned with country-specific commitments and priorities. Additionally, by participating in things such as the Comprehensive Regional Protection and Solutions Framework, Costa Rica has worked towards addressing forced displacement and properly responding to those with international protection needs. We have already achieved some tangible results such as cooperation with the Comprehensive Regional Protection and Solutions Framework to share responsibility among countries of origin, transit and destination for forcibly displaced peoples. Costa Rica continues to honor its commitment to the protection of refugees, asylum seekers, returnees, and displaced persons, their inclusion in the labor force, and assistance in the reduction of poverty. We are working towards creating better inclusion, discouraging xenophobia, and stopping discrimination at its roots, especially when referring to medical care, legal protection, and access to basic services for these economically disadvantaged people. Costa Rica continues passing, reviewing, and revising policies in order to properly address and attend to the social and economic needs of these individuals.

Country:Cuba
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
We support the United Nations efforts to ensure equal treatment of all people and hope to achieve this for the world. We support resolutions that strive for the equal treatment of all, however, we do recognize stereotyping and racism cannot be so simply achieved, so we support the passage of resolutions that will continuously work towards achieving these goals. For the United Nations we hope that we can implement resolutions such as those discussed during the 75th session of the Third Committee of the United Nations General Assembly where we passed the resolution to eliminate racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance. This was one of the many resolutions that we support for our country as well as the United Nations. We support the elimination of ignorance and would support a resolution to educate the people of the world to detect moments of racism, discrimination, xenophobia, and intolerance. We believe this can be done by allowing countries to have open debate with the public and the government. We have seen success in the implementations of such programs in our country, and would strongly support any resolutions that establish such programs. Along with this, we would support a resolution to educate the people on the correct ways to identify racial issues in public and the steps to intervene and stop intolerant action or to reduce the effect of such actions. This can be done through the promotion of educational programs in schools that will educate the children on how to approach situations that involve racism or other forms of discrimination. For the general public, we support a strong focus on having open forums with surveys that encourage citizens to express their concerns when it comes to race. From those survey results governments can implement programs as needed for specific groups of people. Any overlapping issues that span multiple countries can be expressed to the United Nations and discussed in how to remove those issues.

Country:Cuba
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The refugee crisis has been difficult to navigate. Citizens are fleeing their homes, seeking shelter for themselves and their families due to the ravages of war, poverty, and climate change. It is a crisis with over twenty six million refugees, 68% of whom come from just five countries. The majority of refugees come from the African continent, as years of political and economic instability have compounded into an expansive problem. Right now, one in every ninety five humans have been forcibly displaced or removed from their homes. The tireless work by the UNHCR to support refugees across the world is necessary to manage the crisis with any amount of competence. Critical aid from friendly states has made it possible for the UNHCR to continue that tireless work. We urge the UN to further support the UNHCR, especially as the COVID-19 crisis has created new challenges in the movement of refugees. If the UNHCR is to continue its work, it must be given the power to pursue greater assistance. However, we believe that the goal pursued in this session should be to empower the UN to assist in the stabilization of countries that are in need. We reaffirm the individual rights of states, while respecting the need for assistance to stabilize governments. We believe that states should end their foreign intervention, and urge new peace negotiations be established. We will continue to support resolutions that recognize and reaffirm the rights of migrants and refugees. We will additionally support further resolutions calling on action to be taken to assist migrants and refugees. We believe that pursuing this action will have a positive impact on the lives of displaced peoples.

Country:Cyprus
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Since 1974 the southern part of Cyprus has been under the control of the government of the Republic of Cyprus. The northern part of Cyprus, administered by Turkish Cypriots, proclaimed itself the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (“TRNC”) in 1983. No other country other than Turkey recognizes the Turkish dominion over this inherent part of the Republic of Cyprus dominion. A substantial number of Turkish troops remain on the island. A buffer zone, or “Green Line,” patrolled by the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP), separates the two sides. On the northern side of this buffer zone, several human rights issues including crimes involving violence or threats of violence targeting members of national and ethnic minorities have been reported. Recently, the European Court of Human Rights has condemned the illegal actions of Turkey in Cyprus and has affirmed Cypriot sovereignty over the lands now occupied by Turkish troops. On the other side (the southern), the Republic of Cyprus understands its geopolitical and strategic importance in the Greek and Turkish struggle for power over the region, given that the nation’s population is dominant of Hellenic heritage, seems like an affront to Turkey’s desires in the region. The Republic of Cyprus, as a result, is willing to defend the Greek interests in the region, as it reflects Cypriot condemnations of human rights abuses in the TRNC. Furthermore, the Republic of Cyprus aims to send an ultimatum to Turkish authorities for the withdrawal of troops for the region, as failed negotiations and agreements have been observed over and over throughout these 50 years-long unresolved conflicts. The Republic of Cyprus’s constitution and government actions mirrors those of declared at the Declaration of Human Rights as inherent for mutual respect and condemns any type of violations of those rights - racism, xenophobia, intolerance, and racial discrimination – all those actions fostered by the Turkish administration over the region known as Turkish Cyprus. As a result, the Republic of Cyprus will not tolerate any efforts to transform the already delicate situation into a more unsustainable one and will demand the withdrawal of Turkish troops from the region.

Country:Cyprus
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Since 1974 the southern part of Cyprus has been under the control of the government of the Republic of Cyprus. The northern part of Cyprus, administered by Turkish Cypriots, proclaimed itself the “Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus” (“TRNC”) in 1983. No other country other than Turkey recognizes the Turkish dominion over this inherent part of the Republic of Cyprus dominion. A substantial number of Turkish troops remain on the island. A buffer zone, or “Green Line,” patrolled by the UN Peacekeeping Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP), separates the two sides. On the northern side of this buffer zone, several human rights issues including crimes involving violence or threats of violence targeting members of national and ethnic minorities have been reported. Recently, the European Court of Human Rights has condemned the illegal actions of Turkey in Cyprus and has affirmed Cypriot sovereignty over the lands now occupied by Turkish troops. On the other side (the southern), the Republic of Cyprus understands its geopolitical and strategic importance in the Greek and Turkish struggle for power over the region, given that the nation’s population is dominant of Hellenic heritage, seems like an affront to Turkey’s desires in the region. The Republic of Cyprus, as a result, is willing to defend the Greek interests in the region, as it reflects Cypriot condemnations of human rights abuses in the TRNC. Furthermore, the Republic of Cyprus aims to send an ultimatum to Turkish authorities for the withdrawal of troops for the region, as failed negotiations and agreements have been observed over and over throughout these 50 years-long unresolved conflicts. The Republic of Cyprus’s constitution and government actions mirrors those of declared at the Declaration of Human Rights as inherent for mutual respect and condemns any type of violations of those rights - racism, xenophobia, intolerance, and racial discrimination – all those actions fostered by the Turkish administration over the region known as Turkish Cyprus. As a result, the Republic of Cyprus will not tolerate any efforts to transform the already delicate situation into a more unsustainable one and will demand the withdrawal of Turkish troops from the region.

Country:Czech Republic
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Within the United Nations member states, racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerances continue to be prevalent problems. The prejudice against people for their racial, ethnic, or country has been addressed previously by the UN in the United Nations Charter (1945), Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action (1993), and many other documents and conferences. However, there is a growing concern in areas of discrimination, including the connection of police and racism, making reparations for those who have endured centuries of racism, and the discrimination against migrants. Now more than ever, there is a need to address racism and xenophobia as the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the global and growing problem. The Czech Republic is for continued progress in the fight against racism and xenophobia. In our country, there is no desire to engage in nationalism and xenophobism. However, we are concerned that continued progress will affect our political agenda. It is recognized that there is a need to intake the culture from other nations further, but it is also feared that doing so will take away from the rich cultural heritage of the Czech Republic. Additionally, there is fear that lending ourselves to those of non-Czech ethnicity will take away from the Czech people's ability to continue to advance in society economically and take away from their security. The Czech Republic is for creating international commitments but rejects commitments that are legally binding and place mandatory progress. We believe that countries, including the Czech Republic, should make decisions based on what would be best for their country as mandatory commitments do not consider individual factors in each country, including the social, security, and economic situation.

Country:Czech Republic
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As the African refugee crisis continues to manifest new complexities, the international community struggles to derive an effective solution. This refugee crisis has largely stemmed from sub-Saharan Africa, where the number of dislocated persons has reached 33.4 million, which is up from 26.4 million in 2018. These numbers will only continue to grow if the international community does not take decisive action in solving the root causes of this crisis. To do our part, we are willing to accept a sufficient number of refugees. We believe that countries should not have an African refugee quota forced upon them, as individual countries alone have an accurate perception of their unique capacity for refugees. However, the first order of business must be to support countries who have the highest number of asylum seekers, so that the problem is contained in Africa, and does not spread past its borders. With this in mind, we believe first that it is crucial to legitimize the principle of burden-sharing to expand international support to select asylum countries such as Uganda, Sudan, Ethiopia, and the Dem. Rep. of the Congo. Second, we must agree on the need to protect the civilian and humanitarian nature of asylum, as many refugees are malnourished, kept in poor conditions, and victims of sexual assault. Third, we must make an effort to counter political abuse, as refugee problems are fundamentally connected with the political climate of a society, political correction is indispensable for solving them. Our end goal is to solve these political, humanitarian, and social problems by providing financial, material, and humanitarian aid, in an effort to prevent new refugee problems from arising in Africa. However, we cannot do this alone, and we emphasize the need and effectiveness of burden sharing once more.

Country:Democratic People's Republic of Korea
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
We firmly support the United Nation’s continued efforts to eliminate racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance in all forms. The COVID-19 pandemic has underlined the discrimination many face today, highlighting the effect race and ethnicity has on access to healthcare and vaccination as well as worsening the attacks that many, particularly those of Asian descent, fall victim to day-to-day. We are alarmed at this recent increase in xenophobia across the globe and stress our support of taking steps in order to ensure such a rise does not continue. Our country has always stood against racism in all forms, historically supporting resolutions aimed at eliminating discrimination. We believe that the adherence to the International Convention on the Elimination of All forms of Racial Discrimination as outlined in the General Assembly's Resolution 75/237 is a step in the right direction for member states to take, and encourage other states do the same. As such, we urge those who have historically voted against measures aimed at ending racial discrimination to reconsider the factors that have led to their decisions. We encourage states to acknowledge and combat intolerance present in their territory, to fund programs aimed at educating against xenophobia and to hold firm the belief that all human beings are born equal. Simultaneously, we stress the need for sovereignty between states and urge against intervention, emphasizing that it must be states that address discrimination rather than the international community. In order to both put an end to racism and maintain national sovereignty, we support the creation of a set of guidelines aimed at eliminating racism that states are strongly suggested to follow. Such guidelines would lay out specific expectations of states regarding the treatment of citizens regardless of race or ethnicity and work towards the end of racism as a whole while not encroaching on the rights of states.

Country:Democratic People's Republic of Korea
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Though we are not a signatory of the Refugee Convention of 1951 or the Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees of 1967, we support the efforts of the United Nations and member states to provide assistance to those individuals in Africa who have experienced internal or external displacement. We have co-authored several resolutions in the past that have not only helped to solidify the human rights of those persons vulnerable to displacement, but have also improved conditions of safety in African states. In recent memory, we fondly remember resolutions put forward in the General Assembly Third Committee’s sixty-second session and the General Assembly Human Rights Council’s thirty-fourth session. Our stance is two-fold, in which we recognize the need to support these persons, but we also believe that these persons must return to their home state. As such, we both support and encourage the creation of conditions by member states that are conducive to voluntary repatriation. We furthermore believe that the development of durable and lasting solutions to the obstacles which present in the face of displaced persons’ right to return should be the goal and duty of member states of the United Nations. We believe that the monetary and material assistance of the member states will go a long way in creating programs to benefit both displaced communities and their host states. We feel that it is the responsibility of the international community to create the conditions necessary to return safely for those persons who find themselves displaced from their homes.

Country:Denmark
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
It is of the opinion of the nation of Denmark, that we as a nation have learnt from our mistakes of the past. Over the past 150 years Denmark has struggled to attain a democratic society based upon human rights, rule of law, and a social welfare system based on participation and solidarity of all members of the state. In our own experience a key factor to that goal is the adoption a free universal education system from primary to life-long learning. Universal education along with creating a social system of equal opportunity for all members no matter their ethnicity, religion, gender, or other factors. Added with the concept of burden sharing among all people of the nation, provide in our opinion the keys for elimination racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. Therefore, Denmark will do all it can to ensure that these values and strategies are reflected in the Programme of Action from this committee. The fact remains that many former slave nations/colonial powers have fought and will continue to fight any attempts to force them to pay reparations to nations they took resources and people from to increase their own national wealth at the expense of the colonized nations. Given that more than one former slave/colonial power member sits as members of the permanent five members of the security council with veto power over any resolution forcing former slave/colonizer states to pay reparations, including the United States which withdrew from the 2001 World Conference Against Racism, reparations are a policy which will hold back any action taken to reduce racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. Therefore, any course of action which includes reparations in essence is dead on arrival. Given that fact, reparations should be a course of action set aside to stand alone and not hold up action that could pass through the General Assembly and the Security Council.
The effects of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance is also seen in such basic human rights as adequate healthcare. Many former slave/colony nations suffer from a lack of the most basic essentials of human rights due to the loss of wealth from the loss of individuals taken as slaves, depriving the slave nation of the wealth and labor that individual would have given his/her nation, and resources taken by colonial powers. Given that former slave/colonial states do not have the accumulated wealth that colonizing states have, they do not have the medical infrastructure to take care of their peoples most basic medical needs. This effect has clearly been seen in the Covid 19 pandemic. Lack of medical care facilities, as well as medications to treat or prevent the illness has left former slave/colony nations in far worse of a position than former slave/colonizing states. Since reparations are a non-starter in the UN a more attainable way to help the people of former slave/colony states is for the entirety of UN members to give aid to former slave/colony states to improve their basic human rights concerning to medical care in the form of financial aid and medical experts.

Country:Denmark
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The inherent dignity of human life and the further respect for fundamental human rights are at the core of Denmark’s approach to treating refugees. Denmark is a state party in the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees (Geneva) and the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees (New York). Denmark is fully invested in protecting the fundamental rights of refugees and believes in dialogue and international cooperation as the best mechanisms to achieve the objective of a world where refugees can rebuild their lives without having their fundamental rights and freedoms at risk. Denmark believes refugees must be particularly protected by the refuge state, and that they have some special rights and considerations relating to their situation, apart from the fundamental rights every human being already enjoys, including article 14 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Some of the most important among those particular rights of the refugees are the right to non-refoulment (1951 Convention, article 33), the right not to be penalized for their illegal entry into the country of refuge (art. 31.1), the right to be issued travel documents by the country of refuge (art. 28) and the right to free access to courts (art. 16). Denmark encourages the United Nations to take clear and radical strides to make the 1951 Convention and the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees effective, and to protect refugees against all violations of the rights recognized to them in those documents.

Country:Dominican Republic
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Throughout the world today, mass protests against racism have propped up. The Black Lives Matter movement for example, has been a loud voice in the fight against racism. This committee is to ensure such discrimination ceases to exist in the world. The Dominican Republic is a country that houses a mixed population. 72% of our population is of mixed ancestry, while 11% is of African descent. Dominican Republic has long held a strong racial diversity since its founding, with Haitians liberating the country from France. This strong racial tie makes the Dominican Republic very aware of race relations. The Dominican Republic strives for an egalitarian society; our constitution prohibits all forms of discrimination. Along with this, laws have been made to make it illegal for employers to discriminate on race, sex, and status. All of this has been done to combat racism and xenophobia in the Dominican Republic. We want it to be known, that we support the movement towards equality. Not only does the Dominican Republic want justice and equality within our borders, but for this same sentiment to be shared around the world as well. For this reason, the Dominican Republic is proposing that systemic racism be absent in countries. Along with these, protections against different types of discrimination based on prejudice. These are all values upheld in our constitution. Today in the world, there exist much discrimination that we do not align with. Many governments today are systemically oppressing their citizens. Many of these actions have been documented on the internet for all to see. The Dominican Republic proposes countries should focus on modernizing their laws, which have become dated as society progresses towards a more egalitarian future.

Country:Dominican Republic
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Many disasters have taken place in the world recently, many of which have left people looking for salvation elsewhere. The United Nations estimates that at the end of 2019, sub- Saharan Africa had a total of 33.4 million displaced people. Countries are now taking in these refugees, rescuing them from the terrible gripes their country of origin has placed them in. This is a sentiment the Dominican Republic relates to. Our neighbor Haiti has been suffering greatly. Recently, the World Bank stated that Haiti’s GDP had contracted 3.8% in 2020. Alongside that, their poverty rate is at 60%. Thus, many Haitians come to the Dominican Republic looking for work, and a better life. The United Nations has recognized Dominican Republic’s aid to Haiti in their times of need and standing in solidity with them. The Dominican Republic has taken steps to integrate many refugees into our society. We have given 32,000 displaced persons of Haitian descent identification to live within our borders and are currently working to give out more. From the years 2018 to 2020, we have increased the number of refugees accepted into our country by 5.8%. The Dominican Republic will continue taking refugees as much as it’s able to support. The Dominican Republic is a country that recognizes individuals' need for a better life, which is why we have immigrants accounting for 4% of our population. The Dominican Republic proposes that nations should be able to decide on their own how to handle the refugee crisis. No one knows better than the country themselves how many refugees can be taken in. Disregarding a country’s sovereignty on this matter can lead to nations being overwhelmed, and unable to allocate enough resources to comfortably accommodate them into the country. Thus, a country themselves should decide on this matter, not by a third party whose decisions can break the balance of stability in a nation, ensuing chaos.

Country:Egypt
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The international community and the delegations in this body have made great strides to combat racial inequity and xenophobia with the removal of apartheid in South Africa decades ago, the adoption of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action in 2001 and countless strides taken internally to support those who suffer discrimination. The Arab Republic of Egypt is proud to assist in the elimination of all racial and ethnic intolerance and discrimination. Given the multitudes of ethnicities within Egypt, we have taken several steps to implement equity in our society including policy reform within our Ministry of Transitional Justice. Applying our nondiscrimination laws in practice is of utmost important to Egypt and we urge other nation states to implement equity. We are proud to be one of the original signatories to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and will continue to call upon the body to sign on to and implement this resolution. We call upon the body to assist in countries where racial-related hate crimes and forms of discrimination are most prominent, and work to educate and seek justice. We will continue to do so in Egypt, collaborating with committees to ensure ethnic minorities are afforded the same opportunities in careers, education and life.

Country:Egypt
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As an African nation that hosts an increasing number of refugees and persons displaced by conflict, Egypt is committed to assisting displaced persons as both returnees and as people integrating into Egypt. Since 2018, we have nearly doubled our budgets and expenditures on refugee resettlement programs, outlining a response plan amid the pandemic that seeks to collaborate with other nation states. As with many other nations, the COVID-19 pandemic greatly affected the overall operational environment of taking in asylum seekers and refugees, but we look forward to emerging with even stronger wellbeing mechanisms for anyone who seeks to make Egypt their home. We work closely with the UN Refugee Agency to assist in providing cash grants, equitable healthcare, and education assistance to individuals and families. We call upon other nation states in the Third Committee to adopt similar measures and ensure that continued forced migration can be mitigated as much as possible. We also call upon the body to continually reaffirm the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, and to recognize the vulnerability of displaced persons and refugees in Africa as conflict continues in the Middle East and African nations.

Country:El Salvador
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
El Salvador is committed to ending racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia internally and globally. In 2020 we signed the resolution “A global call for concrete action for the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance and the comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action”, and in 2014 we ratified amendments to our constitution to include the recognition of indigenous peoples and the need to maintain and develop their ethnic and cultural identities. We strongly suggest that any member states here today that have not recognized their indigenous people implore doing so. This would help bring the world one step closer to the goal of ending racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia around the world.

Country:El Salvador
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
El Salvador is also committed to assisting refugees, returnees, and displaced persons. In 2019 we voted in favor of the annual resolution of the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), a program made to protect and build a better future for refugees, internally displaced communities, and stateless people. Also in 2018, we voted to affirm the “Global Compact of Refugees''. Showing our support of not only assisting refugees, IDP’s, and displaced persons but also being aware of the future problems such as global change and overpopulation, problems that we will all have to step up to solve as a global community to ensure a just and equal world for everybody. Without the addition of fellow member-states joining into these specific initiatives progress will take time, so El Salvador is eager to work with other countries to adopt previously set forth guidelines.

Country:Estonia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:

Estonia over the past years has made significant efforts in order to eliminate racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. We believe that ethnic Estonians and non-ethnic Estonians alike deserve the right to prosper in society and politically. That is why we established the National Cultural Autonomy Act in 1993, where we wished to grant the minority groups of our country the right to and practice establish their own customs. In the past, we have been strict in striving to maintain the Estonian culture, customs, and language. Now, we have revised our country’s constitution to include Article 151-155 of the Penal code which seeks to protect the minority groups of our country by combating hate speech and any form of discrimination in Estonia through punishments. Among our citizens, 70% of them feel that it is important for all non-ethnic Estonians to have a place of belonging for the sake of Estonia’s economic and political prosperity. This is why our nations will remain faithful to upholding the values established by the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination since 1991.

Country:Estonia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Estonia has ascended its first presidency of the security council and has done so during a time of crisis. Throughout this time, we have set priorities of our time as the protection of the population in accordance to the responsibilities of the council. One being the assistance to refugees, returnees, and displaced persons across the world in this beyond difficult time. While humanitarian aid alleviates the suffering of those who are forced to flee war, it can never serve as a substitute for political approaches targeting the roots of conflict or create the necessary conditions for lasting peace and stability.
Our law is proof of our commitment for the granting of asylum or refugee status. Our government has established a system for providing protection to refugees. The NGO Estonian Human Rights Center (EHRC) and other NGOs help us provide legal and social assistance to asylum seekers. When the option is available, we assist in the safe, voluntary return of some refugees to their countries of origin under a program of the International Organization on Migration. We work on this commitment with the EU and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to implement a refugee resettlement program.

Country:Fiji
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Our position regarding the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia is strongly aligned with the past decisions of this body, that being the fundamental rights of the 1945 United Nations Charter and the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights still hold firm to this day. These two documents apply to all peoples, regardless of race, ethnicity, and origin. We as a nation have seen the disastrous results of racism first hand, where our population was split among ethnic lines, with the indigenous Fijians feeling threatened by the growing population of people of Indian descent on the island. The resulting racial tension has caused persistent issues within our nation. This was a result of colonial rule by the British, and something we have strived to overcome in the last decade. In this trying time, with a rise in hate crimes targeted primarily towards Asian populations, the ever present need for equality and respect among peoples is exacerbated by the real world consequences of lacking in those two regards. In recent years, we have enacted a affirmative action programme within our government in order to help level the playing field among our peoples, and hope to continue to remedy the situation in order to be able to provide guidance to other nations about their issues with racism and other forms of discrimination. In closing, we wish to reaffirm resolution 75/237, calling for concrete action from this body in order to provide relief for those who suffer the consequences of racism, xenophobia, and related intolerances. We especially wish to emphasize that despite effort in this regard, millions of people are still subjected to these discriminatory actions on a daily basis, and we are obliged as a body to provide solutions that will assist all nations in bringing this cognitive plague to an end.

Country:Fiji
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As the forced movement of people in sub-Saharan Africa remains widespread, it is the Republic of Fiji’s stance on the issue that we will accept refugees, but to a limited extent. Of our population, 30% live below the poverty line and we have a 5% unemployment rate. We mostly rely on the UNHCR for funding in the case that we as a country accept refugees, and we continue to do so because of how much we are an underdeveloped country ourselves compared to others that have accepted refugees. With that said, we have accepted only a mere handful of refugees, specifically from Pakistan and the Congo. We also ask that you do not think of us as unsympathetic to those in need. We have offered refuge to our neighboring nations of Kiribati and Tuvalu in the case of an environmental crisis, known as ‘climate refugees’. We will continue to try to help those in need, however, we need the assistance of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees for assistance in terms of funding and for aiding us with refugees status determination. We also would like to add how the General Assembly adopted a resolution to assist returnees and displaced persons in Africa. We would like to reaffirm A/RES/74/131.

Country:Finland
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Europe, and the world at large, is facing a crisis of nationalism and regression towards inequitable society that must be addressed. Finland has seen its share of these problems and recognizes that only by accepting the shame of history and turning our gazes forward can we build a brighter, more inclusive future. Finland recognizes that racism can be faced by many different groups; Africans or people of African descent, Roma, indigenous Sami, Muslims, Jews and immigrants have all been historically subject to discrimination in Finland, a sin which Finland seeks to rectify with every new legislation. Alongside being a strong proponent of the 16th Sustainable Development Goal for the United Nations, Finland has taken national steps in the past five years to combat exclusivity within our borders that we encourage to be promoted for all at this body, including; legislation necessitating educational bodies plan programs to promote equality, legal pathways for reparations to targeted individuals and a nationwide antiracism campaign targeting youth to consider the deadly effects and consequences of discrimination. Finland also supports the development of an autonomous and independent authority tasked with promoting equality and preventing racism like the Non-Discrimination Ombudsman of Finland. Governments and leaders must be held to a higher objective standard in the creation and maintenance of a fair and equal society which can only occur through objective evaluation. Passive condemnation of racism is insufficient, action must be taken by all members here today. In 1948, under the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, this body declared that all human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. We are still fighting for that truth today. The only way forward is based on education, trust, accountability and persistence.

Country:Finland
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The Republic of Finland is firmly committed to providing ethical humanitarian assistance to countries and peoples with the greatest need so that the rights and dignity of all people and especially vulnerable groups like women, children, and the disabled can be ensured. Humanitarian aid saves lives, relieves human suffering, maintains human dignity, and is greatly needed around the world in disaster and conflict zones. That is why Finland is committed to following the principles of Good Humanitarian Donorship and providing concrete assistance in food aid distribution, the improvement of refugees living conditions, the strengthening and development of healthcare, providing clean and safe water, and improving sanitation in refugee camps in peoples of need. The first round of aid distributed by Finland through reliable and ethical organizations associated with the UN and the Red Cross was 68.35 million Euros in 2019. In 2020, Finland distributed 115.1 million Euros of aid to people in need, and as of March 2020 had contributed 19.6 million Euros to humanitarian assistance in African countries and regions such as Somalia, South Sudan, and the Lake Chad region. It is important that in our aid we do not become partial to political or economic motives, but focus on creating good conditions that allow for faster reconstruction and the return of refugees to their homes. Additionally, Finland recognizes the vulnerability of children, women and girls, the disabled, and their need for special protection. Finland aims to meet the immediate needs of refugees and create good conditions for reconstruction and the return of refugees. Finland is an active supporter of international humanitarian aid to African countries and peoples in need to protect human dignity and promote human welfare, prevent future crises, reconstruct crisis torn countries or regions, and build lasting peace and cooperation.

Country:Germany
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Germany is taking all forms of intolerance very seriously. Nations all around the world are rapidly getting more diverse, and it is incredibly important that all peoples can feel safe and welcome anywhere they go, regardless of their race, country of origin, or any other factors. In 2002, Germany created the “National Action Plan of the Federal Republic of Germany to Fight Racism, Xenophobia, Anti-Semitism, and Related Intolerance.” A plan based of 4 pillars, that are always being revised and edited as time progresses to better the lives for any individuals who face discrimination. The 4 pillars include: Human Rights Policy & Education, Supporting Civil Society & Strengthening Civic Values, Promoting the Integration of Immigrants, and Measures Targeted at Perpetrators and Their Environment. These 4 pillars are crucial, each one supporting an idea to all come together for a well thought, efficient, well considered plan. Germany looks forward to discussing this topic with all other UN members.

Country:Germany
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Germany takes very seriously the issues concerning refugees, returnees and displaced persons in and from Africa. Germany has launched an initiative called “Tackling the Root Causes of Displacement - Reintegrating Refugees” created by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, and there has been 330 million Euros ($382 million USD) set aside for this initiative. This initiative has created schools in 19 different African countries to help better the lives of many African citizens. Through the field schools, for example, crop yields have increased by 20%. The initiative helps keep conflict to a minimum, encouraging people to stay home rather than flee. It also helps migrates to new countries get started and returnees get back on their feet in their old country. The initiative not only helps Education, but improves water supplies and healthcare services while offering psychological assistance.

Country:Ghana
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Republic of Ghana condemns all acts of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance, and sees the elimination of these practices as vital in achieving peace and good governance throughout the world. Ghana acknowledges these ongoing struggles against discrimination, namely with police brutality against those of African descent and the disparate effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on people of color. Ghana has always stood against racial discrimination as a state-party of The International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1966). As a testament to Ghana’s continual stance against racism, Ghana has implemented two programs aimed at providing refuge to those of African descent. In 2019, Ghana unveiled “The Year of the Return” program and in 2020, the “Beyond the Return” initiative, in commemoration of the 400-year anniversary of the first enslaved Africans reaching America. These two programs call for all those of African descent to emigrate to Ghana. These emigrants have freedom from oppression, equal economic and investment opportunities, and the ability to celebrate their African heritage in the place of their descent. Ghana supports the efforts made by the various world conferences on the elimination of racism, and implores all member states to take part in future conferences, conventions, and talks on this issue. Moreover, Ghana calls for all member states to implement measures outlined in the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action resulting from A/CONF.189/12. Ghana affirms and praises General Assembly Resolution A/66/L.2 of 2001 that commemorates the ten-year anniversary of the Durban Declaration and Program of Action and prioritizes the elimination of racism and related intolerances. Moreover, Ghana recognizes the importance of A/RES/217 A (III), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This declaration proclaimed the fundamental human rights of all peoples and paved the way for subsequent treaties and conventions. Ghana considers the principles expressed in this document crucial to this committee as we work to eliminate racism, discrimination, and xenophobia.
The Republic of Ghana urges all member-states to adopt domestic measures promoting equal rights and opportunities for all, especially with regards to policing, healthcare, and education. Additionally, Ghana supports all efforts put forth by this committee to eliminate discrimination, such as more funding for research into how member states can further eliminate discrimination. Moreover, Ghana urges member states who have not yet ratified past UN conventions on eliminating racism and discrimination to do so for full implementation of these conventions.

Country:Ghana
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The Republic of Ghana recognizes the need for action in Africa due to the numerous adults and children who are refugees and displaced persons. Ghana sees internal conflict and its consequences as the reasons for this issue in Africa. Ghana has always supported the rights of refugees as a state party of the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees that gave all refugees worldwide the same rights as the Convention on the Status of Refugees (1951). As a state party to the 1969 OAU Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa, Ghana also supports further efforts by the African Union to handle the issue of refugees, returnees, and displaced persons. Ghana’s own laws on refugees reflect the rights of refugees outlined in the two aforementioned conventions. The Ghana Refugee Act of 1992 also ensures refugees have equal rights and opportunities to economically support themselves, alleviating potential strains on Ghana and international organizations financially. Ghana encourages member states to adopt similar domestic laws on refugees. Additionally, Ghana urges African states to take further action to manage displaced persons within their respective borders. Ghana considers good governance and freedom from oppression in all African states as the long-term solution for refugees and displaced persons in Africa. Until this goal is achieved, Ghana calls for the UN to fund more humanitarian efforts in Africa as the UN did in Operation Lifeline Sudan in 1989 and 1990, in Somalia in 1992, and in Rwanda in 1993. Ghana supports previous measures adopted by the UN for refugees, returnees, and displaced persons in Africa with A/RES/46/108 calling for further aid and support in Africa. The Republic of Ghana urges action and support from all member states in providing aid and resources to African states involved in internal conflicts. This aid is essential in mitigating the immediate effects of conflict on individuals as well as in strengthening the governments of African states.

Country:Guatemala
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racism has been going on for decades in the world. Guatemala, along with the United Nations, stands strongly against racial discrimination. Recent events have demonstrated a need for change, and events have shown the world the racial discriminations individuals often face. Underrepresented communities are yet the most common communities that deal with racial issues. Racial discrimination impacts income inequality, the healthcare system, and most importantly, education. The need to fight against these racial issues is strongly important, and Member States must continue their efforts to eliminate this discrimination.
Guatemala and the Member States are strongly against racial discrimination. In 1948, the United Nations ratified the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which stated rights as fundamental for the international community. With that being said, the United Nations recognized the aftermath of World War II and decided to have a legal document stating the international community’s rights within the United Nations. Guatemala has put in place many programs to fight against racisms, one of them is The Commission against Discrimination and Racism (CODISRA). In 2002, the international community came together to discuss racial issues alongside Guatemala. The Durban Declaration and Program of Action are the result of studies and discussions presented before and during the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance, held in the city of Durban, South Africa during 2001. The primary objective of these documents is to provide a series of guidelines and recommendations to States, non-governmental organizations and the private sector to undertake a real and frontal fight against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance. Guatemala looks forward to working with other Member States to continue to ratify solutions against all types of racism.

Country:Guatemala
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Action towards the assistance to refugees, returnees, and displaced persons in Africa is necessary to achieve safe, peaceful borders within the Member States. During the 72nd session of the General Assembly in 2017, Guatemala supported the Report of the Third Committee on Promotion and protection of human rights: human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms. Guatemala has worked with the UN Refugee Agency (UNHRC) to establish a new asylum unit. It is crucial for Member States to implement asylum procedures for the safety of our refugees.
During the 74th session in 2019, Guatemala supported the draft resolution, A/c.3/74//SR/47 to ensure safety, health and human rights of refugees, that would establish a long-term program for the development of all societies. This draft resolution acknowledges the contributions immigrants make and would ensure all Member States remain committed to strengthening the asylum system. Guatemala ratified the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol in 1983. Member States should highly consider accepting more refugees. The Guatemalan delegation looks forward to the continuation of supporting assistance to refugees in the international community.

Country:Hungary
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Domestic efforts worldwide to address racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance have been ineffective. Hungary is extremely concerned that such domestic problems are contributing to refugee crises worldwide as individuals flee discrimination. There are currently estimated 82.4 million displaced people, and an estimated 4.1 million are asylum-seekers. It is in the best interest of the international community to prevent such crises.
Hungary has witnessed firsthand how European countries in particular are impacted by refugee crises. The displacement of refugees is exasperating problems within countries and preventing governments from upholding obligations to their own citizens. It also brings attention to dangers such as terror attacks, the inability to provide for displaced people, and an overpopulation of refugees that directly threatens the quality of life for both refugees and citizens of member states. Member states have struggled with the inability to successfully balance neighboring countries refugee intake along with their increase in population. Hungary believes that influxes of displaced persons places undue burden on European countries.
Hungary proposes the international community should tackle the problem by providing financial support for member states to end racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance domestically. Hungary currently provides domestic support through the Hungary Helps program. With this program we have been able to attack the root causes of migration and securely help 250,000 people remain in their region. Through this program Hungary pays special attention to persecuted religious groups by partnering with local faith- based and non-governmental organizations. Hungary firmly believes that freedom of religion is a universal and fundamental human right, and providing assistance will allow such communities to remain in their home countries. The Hungary Helps Program’s basic principle is that help must be taken where the trouble is. Hungary believes this is the strongest approach to eliminating racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance and calls on members states to establish similar programs in hopes of ending refugee crises worldwide.

Country:Hungary
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
It is clear that the assistance of refugees and immigration is needed at the international level. The number of immigrants that passed through the Hungarian-Serbian border in 2019 surpassed 244 million, in addition to 65 million of people that were displaced persons. There are currently more than 21 million refugees and 3 million asylum seekers. Many of the refugees and asylum seekers are using Hungary's border with Serbia as a gateway to be able to enter the European Union. Hungary is concerned with the large number of people that pass through the border. Therefore, Hungary proposes to the United Nations Assembly that each member state should work cooperatively on how to reintroduce these refugees back into society and provide them with a safe home country to live in. In order to prevent the entrance of refugees to Hungary and to other parts of the European Union, member states should provide foreign aid to countries that are not able to maintain themselves economically, as this leads to refugee crises. Hungary believes that with financial aid, the international community can prevent the flow of refugees escaping from their countries of origin.

Country:India
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
India has nearly a quarter of the world’s population and as well as the largest democracy, and with it comes many groups of peoples with different backgrounds. All around the world we are aware of the racial inequality that exists all over. The government of India leads by example when it comes to these issues. Some of these groups often have tension with one another. Some of the tension runs deep and is hard to mediate. The issues that come with the xenophobia of each other causes there to be a foundation of distrust of one another. These issues of distrust and contempt of one another causes there to be civil strife as well as a struggle for many Indians in day-to-day life.
With such a large and diverse population with many ethnic and religious groups, India is in a unique position to preserve cultural diversity as well as a great responsibility to its people of making sure they are all treated fairly. The government of India intends to lead by example to other nations. Tensions between ethnic groups are quite important and the government does what it can to solve issues that arise. Tensions between the Muslim and Hindi populations are on the forefront of said issues and the government is doing everything it can to ease the rising tensions. With a nation that consists of 41% Hindi the government believes it important to the government of India to ensure other ethnic groups are well represented. The religious composition, however, is much less varied India consists of 79% Hindu with the next largest group being Muslim, we value the representation they have.
The government of India does not stand however with groups of people who commit acts of violence against Hindu citizens. The use of forceful conversion should not be allowed, and the government of India stands against it. Adding more policies that protect citizens against malicious intent is of utmost importance. The government of India leads by example to others in the global community.

Country:India
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The government of India works hard to give asylum to those who need it. The government of India has taken many thousands of people over the past decades. Many of which flee from Pakistan. Meanwhile, there are those of wealthy countries that do nothing at all. The threat of such countries like China and Pakistan only causes there to be more and more refugees. And with countries such as Pakistan sponsoring Islamic terrorists in Africa the growing number of refugees is exponential. And the government of India wishes there to be a cease in sponsoring such acts.
Europe has done much but many countries within Europe and around the world could do so much more. Terrorists inside Africa have displaced millions over decades, and we see there is little done to help. The government of India has great interest in the economic growth of countries within Africa to protect against the potential of more people becoming refugees. Larger countries with great wealth have the ability to take in thousands more than they are and can do more to help rehouse refugees within Africa. The growing number of displaced people without homes stuck in camps is growing. Islamic terrorists will not stop until countries stop supporting them.
Other countries that have wealth must pick up where other poorer and smaller democracies cannot. The government of India calls upon those who can do more to accept more refugees. Eastern Europe has the potential to do more, as well as America and Canada. Asylum seekers with true reasons must be protected by democratic nations.

Country:Indonesia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
We would like to bring to attention the situation of the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. We as a country will not tolerate the violence that is being created and the mistreatment that is taking place towards African descent, indigenous peoples, migrants, and refugees. The Third Committee focuses on social, humanitarian, and cultural concerns. This is why we are standing up, and speaking out against this mistreatment towards anyone within our country. Racism has no place in our country for it goes against fundamental human rights. It also brings barriers and inequalities in healthcare and disproportionate resource allocation. It creates problems that no human being should ever go through. The elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia allows thereto be more prosperity for the country. It allows there to be growth in economic, political, and legal responsibilities. Covid 19 has made us reevaluate the improvement that needs to be done for tackling racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance to create a better future. We will try to create important measures to advance equity and secure protections for adequate advancement of certain racial or ethnic groups or individuals. We acknowledge that this will take a while considering that most of this hatred is rooted in the past when people of color were slaves and or even colonized. This is an issue that may seem like it is impossible to handle the root of the problem. As a country, this has been a problem for far too long. We want everyone to feel welcome and safe here. Especially now during times like the pandemic taking place. We need to take care of one another, therefore, racism and xenophobia, and discrimination have no room in our country. We will try to make it work for a safer country.

Country:Indonesia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
In society it is not uncommon for one to feel as though they do not belong either racially, religiously, or socially. Currently today we witness the tragic displacement and alienation of immigrants in various countries around the world. However, no continent has seen the horrible ramifications of the struggles people encounter like those in Africa. African countries are in an international crisis when it comes to the increasing amount of refugees and internally displaced persons. An estimated 14 million people in Africa are internally displaced due to conflict and violence and there are an estimated 7 million refugees. Refugee or internally displaced, children account for more than half of those previously mentioned. The discord within refugees and internally displaced persons has been exacerbated by Covid-19 and climate change and will only increase without our assistance. It is pertinent to the world that we come together to end the atrocities that have been transpiring in Africa. The country of Indonesia believes everyone should have a place to call home and that no child shall be deprived of their necessities: food, shelter, and education. We are in favor of governments modifying their strict documentation renewal processes to make education and health care more accessible for refugees and those that are internally displaced. Furthermore, we call upon all nations to gather together in order to discuss the issues at hand more in depth and work cohesively in order to find a solution.

Country:Iran, Islamic Republic of
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The elimination of all forms of racism, discrimination, and xenophobia is a goal of paramount importance to the Islamic Republic of Iran. Article 3 of the Iranian Constitution enshrines the “abolition of all forms of undesirable discrimination and the provision of equitable opportunities for all” as one of the central goals of the government of Iran, and Iran has taken measures such as guaranteeing recognized minority groups seats in the Islamic Consultative Assembly to ensure the voices of racial or religious minorities never go unheard.
We support the continuation and expansion of established methods of combating extremism, including increased education and increased community dialogue. We recognize the immeasurable suffering the twin plagues of colonialism and racism have inflicted on many peoples, particularly those of African descent, and believe reparations are necessary as tools to bridge the gap created by the past and present effects of these scourges. However, reparations should take a variety of forms, including general investment in historically disadvantaged communities, and any effort hoping to make significant progress towards righting the great wrongs of history must utilize these approaches for a chance at success. We recognize the increasing role of various social media networks as hubs for the perpetration and spread of racist and xenophobic ideals, and we believe increased international oversight of social media networks is necessary to ensure adequate policing of extremism. Finally, we believe any approach towards combating international racism and extremism must accommodate for the diversity of nations and avoid a “one-size-fits-all” approach.
Let us redouble our efforts in the fight against racism and discrimination and work to address their root causes once and for all.

Country:Iran, Islamic Republic of
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Iran has faced challenges with handling refugees of its own, especially among our shared border with Afghanistan, and we see a set of parallels between our own experiences and needs and those of countries more directly impacted by African refugees. We recognize that, despite the absolute humanitarian necessity of providing assistance to refugees, governments of host countries can face negative political effects from taking in large numbers of refugees, including increased ethnic tensions. Any approach towards the African refugee crisis must acknowledge the necessity of supporting both the refugees themselves and the governments which host them.
We seek to find a comprehensive solution to the mass influx of refugees into our own borders, including finding new nations to resettle refugees in and providing greater resources for refugee camps. We recognize that no one nation should be forced to shoulder too great a share of refugees without substantial assistance, and we are strongly supportive of an international system to “share” refugees between internally stable nations and provide aid to countries with large amounts of refugees. Furthermore, improved systems for monitoring refugees and handling visa applications is in order. Finally, despite having little national experience regarding Internally Displaced Persons(IDPs), we recognize that improved refugee networks must not come at their expense, and any expansion of refugee systems should also accommodate IDPs.
It is critically imperative that refugees from volatile situations be protected, but only a collective effort has even a chance to address the crisis adequately.

Country:Iraq
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
As the Third Committee of General Assembly for Iraq, we have shown to be in favor of resolutions to combat laws and actions that contribute to fueling contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance. We are now looking for help to eliminate these issues with help from all countries within the United Nations. We want to protect the people of other countries, by assisting the citizens that are under these circumstances. We can do this by sending support, military protection, and peace officers to combat these humanitarian issues. In doing so, we are creating long-lasting allies to help support and aid other allies or ourselves from humanitarian atrocities. In addition, we have been in favor of policies that eliminate these atrocities, by remanding one's wrongs and voting in favor of social, humanitarian, and cultural rights. Member states should vote in this way, to help re-write the wrongdoing in the history of one's own country. Not only that but also encouraging the peaceful protest and creating laws to eliminate prejudice shows an ample amount of support to its victims. To help victims with compensation for these atrocities, certain prosecutorial procedures need to be adopted in order for them to have some sort of economic, social, and political opportunities. This can be done through job programs and laws administered by member states to ensure victims are getting equal treatment for years to come. As a country of the United Nations we must maintain peace and security, having racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia would go against our purpose. Having member states check up on the other states can help these countries keep their commitment to preventing racial intolerance. This can be done through constructive criticism and communication between member states to make sure everyone is keeping up with their commitment.

Country:Iraq
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As the Third Committee of the General Assembly for Iraq, we have shown to be in favor of the UNHCR and the High Commissioner for Refugees. We continue to condemn all forms of violence that violate human rights. Especially, when those violations lead to displaced persons resulting in refugees. It is vital that the UN has a clear consensus on the impact that refugees have on the international stage. It is of the utmost importance that states consider the needs of children when enacting procedures for refugees. One of the highest priorities for the UNHCR is pursuing the 24 States of the African Union who have not yet ratified the Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa. With Ethiopia’s ratification, the Kampala Convention is officially ratified. However, it is still important that the rest of the AU also ratify for a full force effort in the region. A monetary incentive could be beneficial in this endeavor. Furthermore, climate change is also a large contributor to displaced persons and will only get worse in the African region. This is why the UN needs to tackle climate change in a united front. The UN should focus continued pressure on the states with the largest contribution of climate change: the United States, China, and India. It is also essential that the funding for UNHCR is continued and increased, before it has run out. This is essential in planning for the future. Without a significant increase in funds, it will be impossible to properly handle the refugee crisis. In addition, internal conflict in the African region is one of the largest contributors to the increase in refugees. The UN Security Council must intervene. Unless the war-like conditions in the African regions are put to a stop, the emergence of new refugees will only continue. Coupled with the effects of climate change there will be an unprecedented future for the African region that will affect the international community for years to come. That is why the time to act is now.

Country:Ireland
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The United Nations has a long-standing history of opposition to any form of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance given the founding values the United Nations has since its creation. The 1945 United Nations Charter and 1948 the Universal Declaration of Human Rights both clearly state that all people merit fundamental human rights regardless of their race, origin, and ethnicity.
In recent years, the international community has yet again witnessed and experienced the emergence of racism and xenophobia rooted in our societal and systemic structures. These acts of intolerance and xenophobia are heightened by the spread of misinformation and hate surrounding the COVID-19 global pandemic as well. The State of Ireland also has experienced these difficult situations as the rest of the international community.
As a signee of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the State of Ireland, along with the other 191 member states, dedicates its best effort not only to protect the rights of all people and oppose any form of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance but also to counteract these acts. The Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission in cooperation with the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination has been actively reporting such incidences since 2019 and outlined over 150 individual recommendations to the leadership of the State of Ireland. The State of Ireland also reaffirms its commitment to cooperate with other member states in combating Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, and Related Intolerance widely.

Country:Ireland
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which proclaims that all people are born free and equal in dignity and rights, also affirms “that everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each State and the right to leave any country, including his or her own, and to return to his or her country.” In 2019, the Secretary-General observed that the population that has been dislocated in sub-Saharan Africa had increased to 33.4 million, seeing a significant increase from 26.4 million in 2018. According to the United Nations Refugee Agency of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, the population seeking refuge in Africa alone has been doubled from 2.2 million to 6.3 million over the last decade.
Agenda 2030 and Agenda 2063 for Sustainable Development collectively call for the international community to expand their access and promote the solutions towards the sustainable socioeconomic inclusion of all displaced people and their communities. These displacement and migrations are affected by a number of factors including an unstable economy, lack of local resources, climate change, and many more. The international community has taken on different leadership pathways in taking action for refugees, returnees, and displaced persons.
The State of Ireland recognizes that these cases are serious issues to be addressed for the sake of global humanitarian assistance. In accordance with Resolution 70/148 adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2017 and under the obligations of international Human Rights law, the State of Ireland had and continues to establish strong mechanisms to welcome refugees, migrants, and displaced populations and to protect those from acts, manifestations, and expressions of racism, racial discriminations, and xenophobia.

Country:Israel
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Throughout history, the people of Israel have been on the receiving end of religious persecution, racism, racial discrimination, and other related intolerance. For this reason the state of Israel has and continues to support the United Nations Human Rights Council to prevent further racial discrimination against the population of Israel and those of other sovereign nations. Israel showed this support by ratifying the Fourth Geneva Convention in 1951, which solidified their view on the protection of human rights globally. Israel’s constitution contains a bill of rights that protects all Jewish citizens within their territory from racial discrimination and other related intolerances. Israel has repeatedly come under attack because of the religious affiliation of its citizens, and reiterates the right of sovereign states to defend against state persecution.

Country:Israel
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Israel has maintained its tolerant policy towards the refugees, returnees, and displaced persons of Africa. Israel hosted nearly 53,000 adult and children asylum-seekers in 2020 and was able to successfully include such groups in their national response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In eliminating the opportunity for the deportation of refugees and asylum-seekers from both Eritrea and Sudan, Israel has shown its dedication to supporting those displaced from their origin countries. As a member of the Executive Committee of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Israel is committed to supporting the African refugees, returnees, and displaced persons that have been accepted into its borders and determining the correct refugee status of the asylum-seekers.

Country:Italy
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Italian Republic firmly stands against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and other related intolerance. We protect the rights of people in article 3 of our constitution guaranteeing that no one should be discriminated against based on their sex, race, language, religion, political opinion, personal and social conditions. Italy believes that the Declaration of Human Rights passed by the United nations should be enforced, specifically articles 1 and 2 which protect the rights of all people regardless of sex, race, language, religion, political opinion, personal and social conditions. The Italian Republic also recognizes the Resolution on the anti-racism protests following the death of George Floyd which was ratified by the European Union. The Italian Republic condemns any form of racism or discrimination, and vows to work toward reducing and eliminating this scourge of society. The Italian Republic believes that each state should decide how they handle the problem, and that their sovereignty be respected.

Country:Italy
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The Italian Republic supports the protection of rights for migrants in their travel from one state to another and also supports the rights of state sovereignty to decide how to handle the migrant crisis. Italy supports the Declaration of Human Rights, specifically articles 13 and 14 which state that all people have the right to move to whatever state they chose and the right to seek asylum. Providing support for those displaced in Africa is imperative because the United Nations are a global community and should support the needs of those around us in any way that the state is available and willing to. Moreover Italy is a key donor and partner around the world in protecting and assisting people of concern to the United Nations High Commission for Refugees and is a partner across the seven regions thanks to its network of public officials and the numerous Italian NGOs involved in humanitarian assistance.

Country:Japan
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Whether the value of humanity is being appreciated more or less might seem uncertain today but one should admit that human rights are expected to be treated by states more as a requirement, a duty, and less as a privilege, a moral obligation, these days if they are to keep their standing in the global arena.
Japan has been largely a homogeneous nation-state for a long time with 97% of its population comprising native Japanese people these past few years. Less exposure of local people to the diversity of nations living side by side was the main reason xenophobia had no major frequent outbreaks nationwide except the historical friction between the Japanese and the ethnic Korean residents in Japan.
However, the impending demographic challenges of the aging population and the consequent shrinking of the domestic workforce have led Japan to open up to the world and adopt immigration reforms in 2019 which expanded visas to allow more than 345,000 new workers to immigrate to Japan in the next five years. Even though Japan ranks moderately high on global indexes of acceptance and tolerance of immigrants — which can be proved by 70% of Japanese people who voted in favor of the recent changes in immigration policy — it doesn’t guarantee that the status quo will remain the same once the new wave of immigrants settle in the country. Therefore, today it’s important for Japan to implement their national strategy for preventing racism and xenophobia within the country.
It should be emphasized that in this process there is no universal effective model to be adopted worldwide, but rather each state should build their own unique strategy considering their demographic and national make-up. The role of accessible inclusive education is great not only because tolerance to diversity can be nurtured in the younger generation of locals but also immigrants and ethnic minorities can have a chance to fulfill their potential through education which would leave less room for stereotypes about them and more respect and acknowledgment in the long run.

Country:Japan
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Even though dozens of international treaties and declarations have been signed by member states that guide them towards building an ideal peaceful world with human rights and justice guaranteed, still the world we’re living in today is far away from that ideal paradigm. This implies that not everything stated and even written is followed by an immediate action. Refugee Convention of 1951 with it’s subsequent Protocol of 1967 clearly outlined the rights of refugees as well as the obligations responsible bodies should follow to take care of them. But the number of refugees globally keeps increasing more than ever before with 82 million people displaced by force up to now the largest percentage of which is from sub-Saharan African states.
Global donors are pledging millions of dollars to manage the population of refugees but it should be noted that most of these humanitarian aids are focused on the urgent amelioration of the status quo rather than long-term sustainable development. In times of crisis basic needs like food, healthcare, and safety are prioritized while education is secondary. But still the problems on this continent are not going to be solved any time soon therefore actions being taken now by Member States should resonate with the goal of making long-term progress.
Educating refugee children — which comprises 57% of the refugee population in Africa — through volunteer teachers is key in this process. Instead of providing one time financial assistance to the refugees it is more effective to help them find the source of stable income through the small grants distributed to them to start their own small businesses which would supply the community with cheaper local products.
However, the impending climate crisis as well as the growing population on the sub-Saharan continent imply that 85 million locals will be displaced in the next two decades thus making it urgent to take even larger-scale actions to address the basic water and food scarcity challenges in the region. In this process, sustainability models of developed countries like Germany, Austria, and Japan in producing energy from solar power as well as recycling the waste water and trash could be adopted by African states which would supply internally displaced refugees as well as regular residents with the sustainable source to meet their basic needs.

Country:Kuwait
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Kuwait strongly objects to discrimination of any kind. We are aware of such shortcomings in our own nation, and can assure all the nations of the world that we are doing our utmost to address any issues that have been reported. In terms of the international situation, we firmly believe in the rights of all people, regardless of race, gender, or religion, to be free to do as they please without fear of violence or any legal restriction. In our country we have done much to create harmonious relationships between our 3.22 million immigrants and our 1.4 million native residents. We also are host to many migrant workers who have not reported incidents of hatred. We prize our position as the most free nation of the Middle East and we assure you that the full weight of the Kuwaiti government is against those who seek to exclude and discriminate against others. Kuwait proposes that this committee create a bureau to investigate the law codes of nations around the world and to determine laws that infringe on the rights of individuals in any way. We also recognize that cultural stigma takes time to go away, and advocate for increased efforts at education and awareness to help reduce the effects of the former.

Country:Kuwait
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
With the onslaught of recent refugee crises within continental Africa, the need to maintain existing refugee policy is crucial. We have supported the United Nation High Commissioner (UNHCR) in their endeavor to aid refugees, returnees, and displaced peoples in Africa. As such we will continue to provide temporary asylum to refugees, and displaced peoples in the affected regions. However our existing residency sponsorship will continue to be applicable only to those with work sponsorships, investments, or a family link. Kuwait is a member of the United Nations and the International Labour Organization and is an observer state to the International Organization for Migration. There are no national laws or administrative regulations governing the status of asylum-seekers or refugees. All non-citizens in Kuwait fall under national immigration laws which is also referred to as expatriate law including refugees and asylum-seekers who register with UNHCR. Kuwait is not a party to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol. All non-citizens in Kuwait fall under national immigration laws. The refugees cannot benefit from integration opportunities during their stay because it is always considered to be temporary and resettlement or repatriation is the core objective. Visa restrictions are imposed on several nationalities and refugees from these countries, which unfortunately denies them access to basic public services like education, health care, and employment. Kuwait is always helpful in aiding financially to help displaced people. We are an important donor and a generous partner to UNHCR, providing long- standing support to operations in the Middle East. Through our contributions, we provide vital assistance for emergency programming permitting UNHCR to deliver essential services and meet the needs of refugees and displaced people. Kuwait firmly supports policies that encourage the return of refugees and displaced peoples to their homes. We have seen the massive burdens that refugees can place on host countries and we believe the international community has a duty to ensure that refugees and displaced persons have a safe environment to rebuild and thrive. We are ready to do our part with funding and temporary asylum assistance, but we believe that the main goal should be the safe return to their homelands.

Country:Latvia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Our country, Latvia, is a very beautiful and diverse place. With roughly 62% of the population being our native Latvian people and the rest making up people of other ethnic identities (Russians, Belarusians, Ukranians, Poles, Lithuanians, Roma, Jews,etc), with ethnic Russians making up roughly 25% of the population and most being immigrants and/or non-citizens. In the last few years, there have been accusations that the Latvian government is xenophobic toward non-Latvian ethnic people and immigrants with no citizenship. We take these accusations very seriously and these claims couldn’t be further from the truth. In our public schools we have workshops on multiculturalism and discrimination as part of Latvia-Equal in Diversity project. When it comes to our government and its take on xenophobia, we feel that laws we have currently in place are fair towards immigrants and/or non-citizens. There has been concern over the fact that non-citizens can’t apply to work in government related fields such as police work, lawyers etc. But this is for national security reasons only. If a non-citizen were to wish to apply to work a job in a government field they must simply become citizens. We don’t want someone to hold such a position of power unless they are truly loyal and committed to Latvia. To become a citizen in Latvia is a fairly easy process; all we ask is that you must live in Latvia for at least 5 years and then pass a language and history test. This is far easier than compared to other countries (including other EU countries); for example, in Germany you have to live there for 8 years before applying for citizenship and 10 for Lithuania. The most important thing in our government is to maintain peace and equality in our beautiful and diverse country, where no person feels left behind regardless of their ethnicity or citizenship status.

Country:Latvia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Our increasing number of refugees over the past decade have made us grow in our legislation. Our data shows that since 2005, our numbers of refugees have grown. We offer housing and an allowance once the refugee paperwork goes through. Our inclusion of refugees into our society is broadcasted to our support groups. The group I Want to Help Refugees, has been very helpful in gathering materials. They have helped us with clothing and food for the refugees. If the refugees have to stay in our refugee facilities, groups like I Want to Help Refugees, will make sure that they have all of the resources they need. Migrants from different countries can come and claim asylum. Thanks to our involvement in the Law on Asylum, we welcome as many as we can. However, Latvia has been struggling to provide enough resources and support for our refugees, and urge more assistance from UN bodies to help with developing further integration programs.
It is also worth mentioning that at some point, we do require refugees to learn our native language in order for them to smoothly work in our culture. We do require this just so that it is easier for the migrant and it can give them more opportunities, and support any similar type of program and resolution supporting the proper integration of refugees into their new society. Also, Latvia has donated to the UNHCR on a regular basis since 2012, supporting thousands of Malians in Burkina Faso, and thousands of displaced people in the Central African Republic. We believe in supporting efforts to assist displaced persons in Africa, as to help curb the international migration crisis.

Country:Luxembourg
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
On the 11th of October 2019, a French elected official attacked a Muslim woman for wearing a religious veil on her head. She had the right to do so. This is not the first time that a woman wearing a headscarf has been singled out. More broadly, Islam, the religion of Muslims, is often the subject of debate between politicians or other personalities. Because of this, many Muslims do not feel accepted in Europe and are subjected to daily discrimination. The storm of ongoing conflicts in the Middle East, the migration crisis, and the series of terrorist attacks in Europe have led to the conflation of Islam and terrorism. As a result, Islamophobia is on the rise in Europe and members of Muslim communities are more likely than ever to be discriminated against when they live as a minority. The climate of ambient racism and the propagation of xenophobic speech has encouraged a series of humiliations and attacks directly targeting people of Muslim faith. We cannot keep sweeping this matter under the rug. We need to fight internationally, by establishing a committee to oversee racial violations that go against the interest of equality for all. The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg firmly believes that each nation must deal with issues related to the fight against racism and intolerance, for instance by setting up independent monitoring bodies in the field of human rights. Such organs can be composed of independent and impartial members, appointed based on their moral authority and their recognized expertise in dealing with issues of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, antisemitism, and intolerance. We, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, strongly urge each member state to continue fighting for the rights of everyone.

Country:Luxembourg
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Over the last decade, humanity has been witnessing one of the worst refugee crises in modern history. According to the UNHCR, in 2015 the cumulative number of displaced people reached 59.5 million around the world. In that year alone, a staggering number of 1,046,600 people sought refuge in Europe. This was mainly due to the rising tensions and political instability in the middle east and Africa, a region that accounts for 36% of refugees and asylum seekers. We, the delegation of Luxembourg, acknowledge the complexity and severity of this issue. Hence, we express our willingness to rescue migrants fleeing through the Mediterranean and support any joint international effort that aims to tackle this matter. As stated by our Prime Minister during the United Nations’ 74th General Debate: “ our ties with the African continent are not just a question of migration, our ties go back a long way, rooted by geographical and cultural proximity, and by common history… ties of friendship and solidarity… and a significant part of our aid goes to them”. Therefore, the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg has honored those ties through its continuous commitment and support to combat this horrendous humanitarian crisis. One amongst many of our efforts is our one million euros donation to the UNHCR in order to consolidate their endeavor in tackling the migration crisis in Libya. Moreover, on 18th December 2015, Luxembourg adopted new legislation that reduced the asylum-seeking procedure to only 6 months. Nevertheless, we have to admit that more could be done to better address this plight. Thus, we call upon other European countries to speed up the process of migrants’ distribution and collaborate more efficiently in order to uphold the objectives of the Global Compact on Refugees. In addition, The Grand Duchy of Luxembourg recognizes that admission into our land is not enough, a rehabilitation mechanism should be put in place for more sustainable integration of those individuals into their new societal environment.

Country:Malaysia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
In December of 1960, the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution condemning all manifestations and practices of racial, religious, and national hatred. Yet, racism continues to be a global epidemic today that impacts the daily lives of people in every single country. While Malaysia is not exempt to the xenophobia, racism, and discrimination that plagues the global stage, the delegation of Malaysia’s own climate is one that is characterized by peace, harmony and mutual respect. Malaysia’s multi-ethnic, multicultural, and multi-religious society in conjunction with effective strategies implemented by our nation’s government, which require participation of all segments of our population regardless of race or color, has fostered a community of inclusiveness within our own nation. These policies are foundationally rooted within the fabric of our government. The Malaysian constitution forbids discrimination against citizens based on sex, religion, and race. Furthermore, we recognize that some of the most vulnerable to discrimination are indigenous peoples. Hence, Article 153 of our nation's constitution lists certain protections that prevent discrimination of our indigenous tribes in regard to their education, employment, and other spheres. The delegation of Malaysia recognizes that while our own country has been fortunate in its progress to combat racism and discrimination and largely eradicate this within our own nation, that other countries have seen a significant increase in acts of racism, discrimination, and xenophobia. Malaysia is committed to working with other nations in order to combat this epidemic. We call on each member state to cooperate on the global stage in order to solve international problems of an economic, social, cultural or humanitarian character, and in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms for all regardless of race, religion, sex, or religion.

Country:Malaysia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Africa is home to a third of the world’s refugees and displaced peoples. Displacement has been triggered by generalized violence, terrorism, food insecurity, environmental disasters, armed conflict, and persecution. Malaysia recognizes displaced peoples and refugees as some of the most vulnerable in our global community, but also as some of the most resilient and inspiring. Currently, Malaysia is home to 179,510 refugees and asylum seekers. Our nation believes that it is our responsibility to provide shelter for those who are escaping their own country’s turmoil. Our own nation’s government is currently working with the UNHCR in order to establish a national asylum framework and refugee policy that would allow refugees and asylum seekers temporary stay and access to legal work within our own country. The delegation of Malaysia recognizes that our government has to implement more policies regarding the safety and rights of refugees; however, we are actively working to establish these precedents within our nation. The delegation of Malaysia calls upon the assembly to work on a three pronged resolution that addresses the rights of refugees in host countries, but also the prevention of a refugee crisis within home countries. The global community must address the factors that cause a mass amount of displaced peoples to become refugees. We call on the member states to focus on a three pronged resolution that addresses the voluntary return of refugees to home countries, local integration of refugees in host countries, and resettlement of refugees and displaced peoples.

Country:Marshall Islands
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Republic of the Marshall Islands strongly denounces racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and intolerance in all forms. Having ratified The International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD), (A/RES/20/2106), in 2019, the Republic of the Marshall Islands has shown its commitment to eliminating all forms of discrimination. During the Coronavirus pandemic, the global community has witnessed a significant uptick in racism and intolerance against residents of the Asia-Pacific due to their perceived responsibility for the pandemic. This is despite there being no basis for this accusation. Additionally, many of these accusations have come from members of governments, as citizens with Asia-Pacific ancestry have served as a scapegoat and the subject of fearmongering. In some regions, increases in hate crime incidents against people of Asia-Pacific ancestry have increased as much as 167% since the beginning of the pandemic. (NBC). As an Asia-Pacific Islander nation, our citizens have been directly subjected to this discrimination. As such, The Republic of the Marshall Islands calls on the members of this committee to author a joint condemnation of discrimination against members of the Asia-Pacific community. In the past, the United Nations and the global community have taken measures to affirm their opposition to discrimination, enshrined in United Nations documents such as the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action (A/CONF.189/12), and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), (A/RES/3/217). However, amongst changing circumstances and modern times, these pledges must be reaffirmed.

Country:Marshall Islands
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
More than 32 million Africans are either internally displaced or refugees, up from 29 million just one year ago (UNHCR). Ongoing crisis in the Sahel, Congo, Sudan, and Horn of Africa threaten to displace millions more. Displaced persons face violence, sexual assault, malnutrition, and disease. 63% of refugees in the Sudan region are children, over 1.6 million of them. (UNHCR). The people of the Republic of the Marshall Islands have their own history of dislocation after the Bikini Atoll nuclear tests. Through this shared experience, the Marshallese people recognize the hardships of displacement.
The refugee crisis is not one that can be dealt with by one country alone. The Republic of the Marshall Islands, therefore, proposes the establishment of a network of regional task forces to coordinate the resettlement of refugees amongst states neighboring an active conflict region. These bodies would serve as independent coordinators and mediators amongst national governments and other regional stakeholders and authorities.
Without a coordinated response to the crisis facing the region, unmanaged refugee flows threaten to destabilize the region even further, exasperating the crisis. The rights to safety and security are fundamental rights that we believe that the international community has a duty to safeguard. The United Nations must also reaffirm its commitment to the principle of nonrefoulement enshrined in the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol. We recognize the difficulty of this endeavor but stand by it as the most practical action this body can take to mitigate the worst effects of the crisis.

Country:Mexico
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racism and xenophobia are issues that every nation faces, with the rate of hate crimes and xenophobic policies increasing worldwide. The United Mexican States is a diverse nation with race serving as the greatest determinant of a Mexican citizen’s economic and educational attainment. The United Nations has implemented declarations concerning racial discrimination and xenophobia, including the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action. The Delegation of Mexico has consistently supported UN resolutions combating racial discriminiation, xenophobia, and intolerance. The Mexican delegation voted in support of A/RES/75/169, opposing the glorification of Nazism and practices contributing to the rise of intolerance. In addition, the delegation supported A/RES/75/237, calling for total elimination of racial discrimination and xenophobia, as well as the implementation of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action. The delegation of Mexico fully supports the betterment of international equality by recognizing the cultural and ethnic diversity of society.
The Delegation of Mexico requests that the UN assembles a panel of experts on racism and xenophobia, specifically representatives from groups such as the International Work Group for Indigenous Affairs (IWGA), to share their research and personal experiences. By emulating the actions of these organizations such as the cross-cutting methodological approaches to those institutions and issues affecting the cultures present as well as implementing a bottom-up approach in solution setting, this forum will be used to propose solutions for a more tolerant and inclusive approach towards race relations and for states to better identify the types of achievable policies according to the needs of marginalized groups.

Country:Mexico
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Africa is home to more than a third of the world’s refugees and internally displaced persons, which is furthered by armed conflict, persecution, terrorist activities, food insecurity and natural disasters. The displacement crisis in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is one of the world’s most complex armed violence to displace large numbers of people. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, border and nation shutdowns have affected asylum requests and the freedom of movement. The 2020 African Union-United Nations annual conference created an agreement to accelerate efforts on the Sustainable Development Goals. The Delegation of Mexico has historically supported UN declarations in support of refugees. The delegation signed the 1951 UNHCR Refugee Convention and the 1967 protocol. Mexico is also a party to the UNHCR Cartagena Declaration, granting political asylum to those who fall into its broader category of "refugee.” In addition, the delegation supported A/RES/75/237, calling for NGOs to protect migrants and ensure the public is educated on migration issues, as well as the implementation of the Durban Declaration and Programme of Action.
The Delegation of Mexico proposes that fellow member states continue their support for UN bodies that provide resources for refugees, including the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR). Given that climate change is an increasing threat to displaced persons, the delegation also proposes collaboration among member states through UN bodies that focus on this issue, like the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Country:Mongolia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The UN Charter and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights outline the United Nation’s opposition to racial discrimination. Mongolia has consistently been committed to the anti- discrimination principles established by the Third Committee and the United Nations as a whole. We have signed on to the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICERD) and attempted to create state policy in accordance with these goals. Mongolia has subsequently adopted 34 laws that ban direct discrimination and 81 aimed at ensuring equality and/or justice. We have also supported the Durban Declaration which attempts to address intolerance toward minority groups around the world. Furthermore, we have consistently demonstrated our support for the General Assembly Third Committee’s actions that strongly condemned all forms of racism, neo-Nazism, and apartheid.
Because of our commitment to the elimination of racial discrimination and racist ideologies, we are interested in pursuing a resolution that encourages universal ratification of ICERD in an effort to more widely advance this legally binding instrument. We expect that increased Member-State adoption will lay the groundwork for Member States to adopt a national policy that commits to the elimination of discrimination within their borders. As well, we would like to emphasize our priority that any resolution adopted contains a strong condemnation of apartheid, neo-Nazism, and other extremism as it presents itself around the globe today (especially as it relates to increasing violence against Asians amid the COVID-19 pandemic). Finally, we invite a resolution that promotes the use of educational programs and initiatives as a tool for preventing racism and racial discrimination.

Country:Mongolia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As of 2020, there are over 35 million refugees, internally displaced persons, asylum seekers, and stateless persons in Africa. That number, and the number of internally displaced persons in particular, is only increasing due to factors including conflict and violence and, increasingly, due to the effects of climate change. The 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and its 1967 Protocol laid the global foundation for concerns regarding refugees. This problem has also been dealt with at the regional level by the African Union, primarily through the Refugee Convention in 1969 and the Kampala Convention in 2009, which aims to address internal displacement. However, both lack effective implementation and enforcement. In order to address the displacement at its source, Mongolia has consistently deployed Peacekeepers to areas affected by conflict to help build stability and keep people in their homes. We emphasize the importance of development as a primary strategy to mitigate the need for migrants to leave their original place of residence and be forced to settle elsewhere.
Focusing on social development and stability, in areas of conflict and disaster in Africa we hope to see three primary goals achieved in any potential resolutions. First, we want to encourage other Member States to contribute Peacekeepers and other resources to affected regions to provide aid and stabilize the area, not only to reduce further displacement but also allow those who fled the ability to return safely. Additionally, we want to emphasize the importance of Member State’s commitment to meeting sustainability goals and preventing further climate change as part of an effort to reduce the number of potential climate refugees and migrants in Africa. Lastly, we would like to urge a strengthening of the Kampala Convention and encourage more African States to ratify it and maintain their commitments.

Country:Myanmar
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
We believe that racism has no place in our modern society and that it should be discouraged. In the past, we were the victims of severe colonial racism that has affected our country into modern times. As a consequence, we take a strong stance against racism in all the forms it takes, particularly the racism evident in recent years against Asian peoples stemming from the unfair blame placed upon them for the Covid-19 pandemic. However, we also believe that states should be allowed absolute sovereignty in their own territories and that this sacred right to sovereignty should not be undermined in the name of anti- racism. Too often, anti-racism has been used as an excuse to criticize or target states simply exercising their own sovereignty to enact policies that they view as necessary for the well- being of the country with no racist intent. As a consequence of this perspective, we have taken a moderate approach to UN action on racism such as abstaining from a vote on UN Resolution 3379. We believe that UN action on racism should be limited to aspirational ideas and condemnations of racism generally not targeting specific countries.

Country:Myanmar
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Myanmar raises the concern regarding the increase of forced displacement of refugees in Africa. We recognize it as a serious matter that an international body of the UN needs to tackle. However, we would like to emphasize the prioritization of sovereignty in this issue. As an independent country, Myanmar requests the UN as well as Western countries to respect our sovereignty. It means that we will not tolerate any forced quota on our nation or any other nation. It also means that we will not allow any accusation of genocide against Myanmar when we simply do not allow illegal immigrants in our land. Myanmar calls upon the third committee to work together to provide appropriate assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced people in Africa but we also want to remind all nations, especially nations with colonial legacies, of the real cause of this compelling issue: Scramble for Africa. As a result, Myanmar calls upon fellow states to put more responsibilities on these nations instead of oppressing small nations such as Myanmar.

Country:Nepal
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
The persistence and prominence of racism, xenophobia, and other related intolerances has continuously brought forth discrimination and division both within and between States. We stand firm in our alliance with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948) in order to provide a more just, secure environment for all – regardless of the vastly different levels of caste discrimination across our nation. We have constantly reaffirmed our motivation in this endeavor through voting affirmative on numerous bills calling for concrete global action for the total elimination of racism. We anticipate finding support in forming a resolution from numerous countries – ranging from the United States, suffering from racially-charged police brutality, to South Africa, suffering from heightened xenophobia and mistreatment of refugees internationally. Although our conflicts may seem vastly different from the next region’s, we look forward to creating flexible solutions that are able to mold to the needs of each nation appropriately in order to provide a safe and stable environment for all citizens. Majority of these solutions can be produced through recognizing the importance of representation at higher levels of authority – both in governments and businesses. Targeting legislation through the economic perspective, specifically during the hiring process, will promote diversity of minorities at higher levels. We firmly believe that there is a common ground of resolution to this issue of discrimination that has grown to become ever-invasive.

Country:Nepal
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Nepal recognizes the importance of supporting refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa. It is clear this issue cannot be ignored by the international community, as the number of displaced persons in sub-Saharan Africa reached 33.4 million in late 2019, a number greater than any other part of the world. Civil wars in the 1980s and 1990s exacerbated the issue, and climate change is likely to worsen the situation in the future as more Africans are forced to leave their homes due to environmental pressures. Forced displacement is especially harmful to children, who are more vulnerable to injury, exploitation, or death than adults. In the past, Nepal has supported UN action with the potential to prevent forced dislocation due to violence by voting in favor of promotion of peace as a vital requirement for the full enjoyment of all human rights by all. Previous UN policies such as the Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees (1967), which expanded the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees (1951) to establish the definition of a refugee, the rights owed to refugees, and the legal obligation of States to to protect them outside of Europe offer a promising base upon which to build solutions to this issue. The Organization for African Unity’s 1969 Refugee Commission remains unable to effectively deal with the issue of refugees, so Nepal proposes offering international assistance to help the Commission implement necessary measures to protect displaced persons. Nepal further proposes setting up additional measures to combat climate change to prevent mass migration that would result from severe environmental harm.

Country:New Zealand
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The New Zealand is proud of the stand made at the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance in their 2001 declaration which reinforced the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, adopted by the World Conference on Human Rights in June 1993. The New Zealand affirms the ideas presented in the World Conference against racism’s topic of Multi-ethnic States and the Protection of Minority Rights; which "condemn any doctrine of racial superiority as scientifically false, morally condemnable, socially unjust and dangerous. The doctrine urges governments to create favorable conditions and take measures that would enable persons belonging to national or ethnic minorities within their jurisdiction to express their characteristics freely and to participate on a non-discriminatory and equitable basis in the cultural, social, economic and political life of the country in which they live". New Zealand seeks to deal with eliminating racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerances through the long term is through education. Not explicitly through traditional education, a non-nationalistic global perspective that we call upon fellow member nations to adopt.
New Zealand proposes putting the power in the hands of the people by informing the public about what they can do to protect themselves and their fellow Kiwis. Creating promotional videos, radio broadcasts and other types of media. Promoting supporting the victim of the attacks, recording the incident so we can hold the perpetrators accountable, as well as reporting the incidence so we can stop the racism especially toward the Chinese considering this pandemic. This will require COOPERATION between international organizations, REINFORCEMENT of United Nations resolutions pertaining to this topic. IMPROVE relations with non-governmental organizations to provide resources and services to vulnerable populations that can fall victim to false association with terrorism.

Country:New Zealand
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
New Zealand recognizes that education plays an important role in understanding assistance of Refugees. In addition, how to prevent violence and conflicts from occurring; with hopes following, that a mutual respect may come about from fellow member states in the United Nations High Commission for Refugees (UNHCR). Education, as well as livelihoods, play a major role in strengthening integration and providing a more stable and safer environment for future generations. New Zealand takes note of UN A/RES/60/1 which promotes human rights for “education and learning at all levels, including through the implementation of the World Programme for Human Rights Education, as appropriate, and encourages all States to develop initiatives in this regard.” New Zealand is fully aware of the lack of access to adequate housing which remains to be one of the primary protection concerns for IDPs in most countries. Education must be seen as a human right for refugees and displaced persons to fully resettle. Within New Zealand, refugees are who are resettled to New Zealand are offered to participate in a three-year integration programme, whose main objective is to ensure integration of newcomers into our society. The municipality shall, together with the person in question, prepare an individual plan of action based on an assessment of the person’s particular skills and qualifications to facilitate the person’s access to the labor market or, if relevant, to education. The main objective of the programme is to enable the person to get an understanding of the fundamental values and norms of society and to ensure that the person, within a relatively short period of time, will be able to support him or herself through a job. This means that the resettled refugee is expected to find work or complete an education aimed at getting a job. In addition, refugees and their family members are offered medical screening. The purpose of the medical screenings is to expose severe health problems at an early stage so adequate health treatment or social measures can be activated as early as possible preventing health problems from becoming a barrier for successful integration of the migrant and his family. During the integration program and until employment is found and the refugees can provide for themselves and their families, refugees resettled to New Zealand are, subject to certain conditions, entitled to income support from the social services. Outside of our jurisdiction there is still much to be evaluated in reference to promoting an international standard for the livelihood of displaced persons. The upcoming process calls for new partnerships that extend well beyond the humanitarian actors and instead places refugees on the development agenda. Affected governments, bilateral donors, multilateral development institutions along with civil society actors and the private sector must all play their part by coming together to find the best possible solutions for all. In this regard, New Zealand would like to highlight and applaud the partnership between UNHCR and the World Bank, which further materialized earlier this year when the Bank joined the governing board of the Solutions Alliance. We encourage the development of such partnerships between UNHCR and other development actors – and would highlight the Solutions Alliance as an ideal framework for operational collaboration.

Country:Nicaragua
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
After the birth of the United Nations, the Third Committee of the General Assembly continued their attempt to eliminate all forms of racism and discrimination. Over the course of history, the problems of racism, discrimination, xenophobia and intolerance has been affecting the communities within and between many states. Such issues remain and issues of discrimination against refugees, hate speeches toward different races, unjust treatment on certain ethnic groups, and economic and social inequality continue. The recent Covid-19 pandemic has only increased this crisis. To abolish and prevent these cancerous behaviors, the Committee brought a number of resolutions and conventions in the UN conferences and international meetings, such as the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the 2001 Durban Declaration, and many others in order for the international community to fight against any forms of racism and discriminations.
As a member state of the United Nations, we stand in favor of eliminating all kinds of racism, racial discriminations, xenophobia, and other related intolerance. Our voting participation in the past resolutions show that we do not welcome such conducts that directly and indirectly violate human rights. Such examples are the support for the International Bill of Human Rights that was invented in 1948 in the UN session which addressed the equal rights of every human being and the recent resolution adopted by the General Assembly in 2020 that calls a global action to combat the ongoing racism and discrimination. Nicaragua also is a community composed of numerous diversity and ethnic groups, which seek to cooperate in unity. To achieve the goal of preventing incidents of racism and hatred both in states and between states, we have established Programs of Office of the Defense of Human Rights and Post-Durban Commission that seeks to eliminate any forms of discriminations by implementing actions in areas like education and health systems. To continue this significant mission, we believe that the taking actions on the previously made resolutions by cooperating one another is crucial and request further integration to be adopted by the Secretary General.

Country:Nicaragua
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Due to the many armed conflicts and wars, the problems of refugee communities in Africa have demanded help and attention. The Third Committee of the General Assembly (GA) requested assistance to refugees, returnees, and internally displaced persons in Africa since the beginning of the United Nations. As the United Nations High Commissioner on Refugee reported, the number of displaced populations from sub-Saharan Africa increased to 33.4 million by 2019. This devastating issue presents the refugees and asylum seekers to search for countries to settle, returnees need the safety to go back, and the internally displaced persons are in life- threatening danger. To protect the refugees and displaced persons, several resolutions and declarations were made through the past conferences. Some outstanding examples are the 1951 Convention and other resolutions including the very recent 2020 Office of UNHCR resolutions. And as of today, there is never enough support for all displaced individuals.
Nicaragua’s viewpoint on assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa is to continue the admirable work of the committee and the UNHCR. As our voting records on the past GA resolutions reflect, we support the refugee community from Africa. We appreciate the 1951 Refugee Convention that brought international attention to the rights of refugees. Nicaragua also welcomes the continuous efforts of the 1997 resolution, in which the UN Human Rights Council decided to cooperate with the International Organization for Migration. With these support for conventions and the resolutions, we recognize the significance of further actions on the refugee communities in Africa.

Country:Norway
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racial discrimination is a belief involving the idea that one’s own race is superior and has the right to dominate others. This is something people learnt, and they can unlearn too. The United Nations has been up and running to eliminate racial discrimination and xenophobia. In the year 1948, they postulated that all fundamental human rights are applicable to all people regardless of one’s race, ethnicity, or origin. This paved the way to the creation of the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (ICRED), also the Committee on Eliminations of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (CRED). The role of law is to translate the principle of non-discrimination into binding norms on how one should behave. Norway implemented the Norwegian Anti-Discrimination Act, which emphasizes on eliminating racial discrimination. Regional organizations like European Commission against Racism and Intolerance had influence on the implementations of laws. Also, The Norwegian Action plan to promote equality and prevent ethnic discrimination focuses on combating discrimination that immigrants, the Sami people, and national minorities are subject to. The Article 135a of the Criminal Code, which was adopted in application of the UN International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, penalizes racist propaganda and incitement to racial hatred. Article 135a is so worded as to require a specific attack on an individual or a particular group of individuals; on the other hand, the mere propagation of racist ideas is not punishable. Better implementation of existing procedures and working on more effective punishments can help eliminate discrimination. Also organizing workshops with people can also help alter their thoughts on racial discrimination.

Country:Norway
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Many African refugees flee to Europe, and Norway is one country that accepts these people with the intention to help them join society. The causes for the arrival of these asylum- seekers can range from extreme poverty and economic instability, social inequities, human rights abuse, and the seemingly interminable fluctuation of government within their home country. Norway’s goal is to integrate these people in a society where they will not experience these issues. Reports of refugees arriving in Norway have been noted since the late 1980’s, and the number increased eminently around the year 2000. In response to the rise in displaced persons arriving in Norway, the Norwegian Introduction Programme (NIP) was instituted and has continued to evolve over the last twenty years. This programme gives refugees the right to language integration learning and primary education and lasts between two and three years. In 2016, the Norwegian Introduction Programme was amended to allow for refugees to participate in full time secondary education, while still being enrolled in the programme. On top of this, the 2003 Introduction Act is also a significant factor in refugee integration, giving asylum-seeking adults and their families the right to partake in a two to three year training programme. Though integrating refugees has, and always will be, a difficult task, Norway has managed to employ 60% of its refugees within five years, and it strives to continue to excel in the endeavor to successfully integrate refugees, by utilizing the 2003 Introduction Act, as well as continuing to amend the Norwegian Integration Programme.

Country:Pakistan
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
We, the delegation of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, recognize the longstanding issues of racism and racial discrimination that pervade world history - notably, the policies of colonial powers worked to systemically decimate and destroy indigenous cultures, religions, and societies. The enslavement of African peoples by European forces is perhaps the most egregious example of racist policy to exist, and it has had a longstanding impact to the present day. Africans living in the United States of America to this day exist in a state of lower status simply because of the status of their enslaved ancestors, while the apartheid policy of South Africa worked to actively place white South Africans above black South Africans.
The United Nations has dedicated itself, as shown by this very committee, to eradicating the problem of racial bias. We, the delegation of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan, strongly believe that this conference has the ability to make a difference in ending racial discrimination worldwide.
The Prophet Muhammed (may peace be upon him), said “Neither a black person has superiority over a white person nor a white person over a black person.” We believe that it is the duty of every devout and faithful Muslim to end the structural policies that enable racism worldwide. Many of these racially discriminatory policies, perceptions, and attitudes stem from economic inequality and poverty. Affluent Western countries are inclined to look at more economically disenfranchised nations through the lens of racial disparity instead of historical or sociopolitical disenfranchisement; in fact, many of these nations look out racial minorities within their own country through this lense instead of considering the failure of their own economic policy.
Pakistan would also like to address the increase in worldwide hate towards Muslims internationally. Muslims in nations such as the United States and France are vilified on a level that borders on racism as Muslims are treated as a singular ethnic or racial minority in these nations. It is of the interest of Pakistan, as well as all Muslim nations, to take steps to address these disciminatory attitudes and alleviate the pressure being put on Muslims worldwide.

Country:Pakistan
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The delegation of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan acknowledges the situation in Africa regarding refugees. Currently, Sub-Saharan Africa hosts over 26 percent of the world’s refugee population, and according to the UNHCR, there were 82.4 million displaced people in the world at the end of 2020, and of that amount, over a quarter were refugees. Close to territory lines in East Africa, the discharge of migrants fleeing perilous situations has created tension and animosity between host countries. The flight and displacement of refugees, returnees, and displaced people in Africa are due to political conflict, natural disasters, poverty, inequality and discrimination. Moreover, since the emergence of Covid-19 in late 2019, situations for refugees in Africa have been exacerbated. The Covid-19 pandemic has dramatically reduced the overall safety, mobility, and food security for a highly vulnerable population.
Despite the difficult situations in Africa, the Islamic Republic of Pakistan would like to state that it is not in a stable enough position economically to provide copious amounts of monetary aid to African countries regarding assistance to refugees, returnees, and displaced persons. Currently, Pakistan has refugee issues. Pakistan has inherited several refugees from Afghanistan; over 1.4 million documented Afghan refugees have migrated to Pakistan throughout 40 years of persistent poverty, food insecurity, natural disasters, and political conflicts in Afghanistan. However, the total number of Afghan refugees in Pakistan is closer to 3 million. This Afghan refugee crisis is stretching the limits of host countries and communities. Therefore, the government of Pakistan requested that South Africa accommodate Afghan refugees in South Africa and on their journey to their final destinations. However, the foreign ministry of South Africa declined the request in early September 2021.
Despite Pakistan’s economic limitations, the Islamic Republic of Pakistan is committed to following through with its 2021 Humanitarian Response Plan. This plan aims to target the most vulnerable 4.3 million people out of the 11 million people identified as in need in the 2021 Humanitarian Needs Overview, equip them with aid, and provide tools to resource programs. The plan covers education, health, food security, water, sanitation, and refugees. In 2021, Pakistan has already sent food and relief assistance shipments to countries in Africa, particularly Niger and Benin.
Pakistan recognizes the ongoing issue of refugees, returnees, and displaced persons in Africa and is ready to end the casualties and suffering of these vulnerable people. However, the delegation of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan would like to iterate that Pakistan is planning on focusing much of our humanitarian programs on the 3 million Afghan refugees staying in Pakistan. Nevertheless, Pakistan desires solutions. First, Pakistan would like to inquire with other delegations for foreign aid to expand the capabilities and efficiencies of its 2021 Humanitarian Response Plan. Second, Pakistan would like to set up systems in which refugees are registered to receive aid. In the Humanitarian Response Plan, Pakistan has distributed Proof of Registration Cards to decrease the number of undocumented Afghan refugees. Third, Pakistan calls for a global plan that uses a multi-sector approach to combat the refugee problem. Simply focusing on safety will not end the crisis.

Country:Palestine (Observer)
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Palestine has suffered many years of racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. This intolerance has been flued by Israeli occupation over Palestine territory. Palestinians have become victims of persecution; many being killed by Israeli soldiers, deprived of basic human rights, and access to viable resources. The plight of Palestinian people under foreign occupation has been insurmountable. The Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) is committed to ensuring the rights and protection of Palestinians against any act of discrimination. Palestine recognizes that other states are experiencing these acts of discrimination as well. Palestine recognizes that all states have the right to security and sovereignty.
Palatine congratulates all nations that are willing to rise against racism and hatred. We reaffirm our commitment to the Convention against Discrimination and the International Covenant on Economic Social and Cultural Rights. In addition, we encourage others to join these treaties to affirm commitment to creating global unity, as well as strengthening current signatories' resolve on these issues. We denounce all elements of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance.

Country:Palestine (Observer)
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Today more than 7 million Palestinian refugees are scattered around the world. The reality of the displacement at its core stems from the ongoing Palestinian-Israeli conflict. The world’s system for protecting refugees is broken and Palestine is committed to assisting refugees, and displaced persons in Africa. Palestine encourages members states to work towards returning displaced persons in Africa and around the world. The United Nations has a history of addressing the refugee crisis. During the fall of 1948, the United Nations asked AFSC to organize relief efforts for refugees displaced by the 1948 war. In 1950 after the second world war the United Nations created the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) to help Europeans who had fled or lost their homes.
Subsequently, both of these efforts are responsible for returning thousands of displaced refugees. Palestine is fully committed to calling on outside organizations in assisting the return of displaced persons. Palestine recognizes the importance of assisting refugees, returnees, and displaced persons in Africa. Palestine denounces all efforts that counter returning displaced refugees to their homes.

Country:Panama
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
In 2002, a representative from the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights worked with Panama to stop the use of mercenaries like those who plotted to assassinate the president of Cuba. The elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and the like are especially important to Panama due to the wide range of nationalities living in the country. Panama is mostly populated Mestizos making 65% of the population, Native Panamanians make 12.3%, black people or those of African descent 9.2%, Mulattos 6.8%, and white people or those or European descent 6.7%. This is due to the large number of people traveling through Central America, namely to seek refuge, so xenophobic actions would impede Panama’s efforts to assist refugees. The UN has worked to stop this by meeting in September of 2021 to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the adoption of the Durban Declaration under the theme of reparations for people of African descent, but can renew their efforts in eliminating all forms of racial discrimination by training relief workers and people of all positions on how to identify prejudice and stop it from escalating into widespread discrimination.

Country:Panama
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The proportion of the global population who are refugees has more than doubled since 2010. For every 100,000 persons, 311 of them are refugees. In 2020, 4186 deaths and disappearances were recorded on migratory routes worldwide. Panama has helped to combat this by housing 19,000+ refugees/asylum seekers from the Central America and northern countries in South America in 2020 alone. That same year, Panama also had 115,768 displaced Venezuelan citizens living in the country, and during the Covid-19 pandemic provided 742 persons with legal assistance and supported 2,603 refugees with CBI and multipurpose grants. Refugees and asylum seekers have however struggled to access a consistent income and daily subsistence due to the Covid-19 pandemic. Panama has helped them by supplying food supplies, medicine, and rent, and will continue to redouble its efforts in providing aid to these groups via grants. These protections of refugees, displaced persons, and asylum seekers are consistent with Panama’s participation in 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees and the 1967 Protocol. These actions do not directly affect these groups in Africa, but nonetheless are aligned with the UNHCR’s goals of safeguarding the rights and well-being of refugees worldwide. Further assistance to Refugees, returnees, and displaced persons by the United Nations can be given by providing them with better access to food, clean water, and housing rather than shelter. Those can be done with the appropriate training of relief workers to give a feeling closer to the quality of life we experience on a daily basis. The 3rd Committee can recognize the rampant causes for people to seek refuge from the area, and urge all states to end the causes in resolutions.

Country:Peru
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance have been storming the world, especially in the last few years. It is one of the main causes that fuel tension between Member States. The most recent events that involves racial discrimination have demonstrated unfortunate acts of violence fueled by racism, discriminatory manners, xenophobia and related intolerance. Racism and intolerance is the primary source for inequality in the world as it places ethnic and race barriers within inhabitants. This leads to double standards within countries, which is evident in inequalities that are observed in healthcare. Countries as part of the United Nations General Assembly have pledged to take the necessary actions and implement concrete measures to combat the issue of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance. First and foremost, any racial acts should be outlawed as well as countries react by criminalizing and punishing any hatred and racist organizations. The Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination and the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination have been appointed by member states to take action against any sort of racial discriminatory acts. Awareness campaigns organized by states’ governments and the public have been utilized to contribute to solving such a universal issue. As well as, the UN has a firm role in allowing countries to join into its conferences to work on tackling such problems, such as the ICERD that oversees all countries joined and checks if there are any racial disputes taking place and intervenes in order to solve whatever the issue.
Peru’s stance, as many other states, involved in the ICERD work with the notion of eliminating racial discrimination, racism, xenophobia and related intolerance and apply any necessary concrete measures are being taken to improve the human rights situation of people of African descent in Peru. Peru approved a guidance note on the implementation of public policies benefiting any and all victimized groups of racial discrimination. Peru is a country committed to the rule of law, the promotion and protection of human rights, fundamental liberties and democracy, and to the fight against corruption. In addition, Peru had approved dozens of regional and municipal guidelines on fighting racial discrimination. According to Peru’s Criminal Code, the crime of discrimination carried a prison sentence, whereas grounds for discrimination included race, religion, nationality, age, gender, sexual orientation, language, ethnic or cultural identity, opinion, economic status, migration status, disability, health condition, affiliation, and other factors.

Country:Peru
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Throughout the years the forced displacement of people has devastated people all over the world, especially in Africa. Each year millions of people are added into the statistics of internally displaced persons (IDPs) that have been affected by this trend. In 2018 alone, there were 26.4 million dislocated persons in sub-Saharan Africa; 6.3 million refugees, 18.5 million internally displaced persons, 530 thousand asylum seekers and 975 thousand stateless persons due to extended armed conflicts, human rights violations, and natural disasters. These numbers are not new but have been ongoing for centuries, which led to Member States of the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees made in 1951, to start signing (in 1967) the 1967 Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees, that would expand the assistance to refugees to all over the world instead of just Europe as it was primarily intended. To further address the challenge, the African Union, in collaboration with the UNHCR and other international organizations, established the Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa in 2009. Also known as the Kampala Convention.
We, Peru, have been committed to recognize all people forcibly displaced during times of conflict as victims and therefore potentially be eligible for compensation, regardless of their large numbers and the resulting financial implications since 2003. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission (Comisión de la Verdad y Reconciliación, or CVR) also recommended that individual and collective compensation programmes be developed in areas such as mental and physical health care, education, symbolic and economic support, and provision of identification documents. Throughout the years it was acknowledged that displacement had to be acknowledged as a situation rather than as a matter of formal registration, which has been a lack of clear benchmarks to the needs of IDPs. Therefore, we are committed to do more than just report IDPs, for the registration process can be cumbersome and places an unreasonable burden of proof on IDPs. IDPs should be given assistance and protection as long as they continue to have specific needs that are or have been caused by their being displaced. It's not simply a matter of getting them into a safe place again, or getting them recognized, it is about getting them the help to recover and claim their human rights that have been so violently and unjustly taken away in the first place by being displaced and unprotected by inside conflicts.

Country:Philippines
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Phillipines strongly believes in the elimination of racism, discrimination and other related intolerances both within and outside of it’s borders. The past few years have been challenging. The COVID-19 pandemic saw a rise of racial tensions, particularly heightened prejudice against Chinese diaspora in the country. We fully support President Duterte’s stance regarding China’s importance to the country, when he urged, “China has been kind to us, we can only show the same favor to them. Stop this xenophobia thing,” after the death of a Chinese national. The Secretary of Foreign Affairs also backs the president in this, stating, “China helps us, we help China. I have spoken.” We recognize the large history behind many of these rising tensions between the ethnic Chinese and Filipino population, such as the conflict over Scarborough Reef and the COVID-19 pandemic. The Philippines wishes to put an end to such troubles and set aside these differences by expanding our outreach and providing opportunities for minorities both in and outside the country.
During the course of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Philippines sent supplies to the Hubei province. We would like to see similar scenarios continue to take place and open up the relationship between China and the Philippines. One solution is to begin programs that encourage and foster relationships both inside and outside the country. These programs would help foster cultural understanding and awareness among the population, with the purpose of easing ethnic tensions in the country. The Philippines is also considering changes on an international level. To assist in opening a relationship with China, we ask that they consider encouraging and expanding upon the network of sister cities in both countries as an opportunity to create connections.

Country:Philippines
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Historically the Philippines has opened its borders to refugees from all over the world. We have opened our hearts and homes to nine different waves of refugees thus far, and we are open to continue this tradition by helping African refugees, returnees, and displaced people. This issue has been pervasive in Africa because it “has hosted a third of the world’s conflicts and, consequently, a third of the world’s displaced persons” in recent times. The number of IDPs in Africa has been continually growing for years and is expected to worsen with climate change and growing populations.
At this moment, the UNHCR and the Philippines has worked together to provide protection and achievable solutions for refugees, asylum seekers, and stateless people through the key result areas of: improved inter-agency coordination mechanisms, enhanced national legislation and administrative regulations monitoring, improved administrative practices, opportunities for capacity building, and attainment of durable solutions. The Philippines has been focused on these key areas to improve the lives of refugees, asylum seekers, and stateless persons; however it is open to other solutions to continue to improve the living conditions of these people. It will consider solutions that are more long-term and targeted to counter future displacement due to climate change or growing population.

Country:Poland
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Throughout Poland’s history as a country, the citizenry has experienced racism that has evolved into various forms and remains present today. Our state is conservative and embraces a populist-right ideology that seeks to conserve the safety and security of our nation above all things. The state of Poland has taken measures to reduce racist worldviews. For example, Poland has established the “Monitoring Team on Racism and Xenophobia” within the Ministry of the Interior in order to investigate racism - particularly on the internet. Primarily, the delegate from Poland is interested in maintaining the solidarity of the Polish population. The problem that we face is that of social, cultural, and political unity. Maintaining this unity is paramount to the order and security of the Polish state. Due to the rise in crime rates occurring in tandem with mass refugee immigrants into Poland, some Polish citizens fear that they are endangered by those who are not Polish. Our national unity must be defended from those who act against our national values and meddle with the solidarity of our national mission. Therefore, the Delegation of Poland does not support the implementation of restrictions on our Nation’s ability to ensure the safety of our national unity.

Country:Poland
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
After Poland ratified the United Nation’s 1951 Refugee Convention and the 1967 Protocol, in September 1991, the country amended the 1963 Aliens Act to formally establish a system for granting refugee status. Until that time, Poland had only granted asylum to people for a limited set of reasons, and most of those who received asylum were communists from Greece and Chile. Since our entry in the EU in 2004 immigration rates have soared. Poland supports paragraph 11 in the UN Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration which states a want to mitigate the adverse drivers and structural factors that hinder people from building and maintaining sustainable livelihoods in their countries of origin. The stated focus is on minimizing irregular migration, with the drivers referred to as ‘adverse’, given their propensity to propel individuals and communities to leave their countries of origin out of necessity rather than choice. Poland also strongly emphasizes the values in Objection 4, Universal Declaration of Human Rights Article 15.1, paragraph 1 from the UN Global Compact for Safe, Orderly, and Regular Migration of the General Assembly. This states that everyone has the right to a nationality. Immigrants that come to Poland can gain legal status but should not expect governmental supervision of livelihood until going through full legal processing. One of the most prominent refugee influx has been the Afghanistan migrants along the border shared with Belarus. Keeping this in mind, the refugees along the border shared with Belarus are expected to go through legal processing before being considered citizens of Poland. These refugees are not within our territory and therefore are not under Polish governmental responsibility until going through legal processing. A state of emergency covering 183 towns and villages has been established in the goal of building a more sustainable process to work with refugees. We recognize that these refugees deserve a safe place to begin a new life, however we also understand the need to maintain a stable country without becoming strained through this heavy influx of immigration.

Country:Qatar
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racial brutality has been a common topic among the citizens of the world for decades. As a fundamental right claimed by the Universal Declaration of Human rights and UN charter, racism and xenophobia are still deeply rooted in global evil. Covid pandemic again highlighted many of the harmful effects of racism, people who are of colored races are less likely to get vaccinated. Black descends are twice as much losing jobs or dying during covid than white peers. Refugees in South Africa were put in camp, without the right to social support, work, and free movement. United Nations has committed to solving racism with decades of effort. African Americans formed the grassroots protest organization Black Lives Matter to counteract police brutality in Minnesota. Antisemitism is growing among Frane, the English labor party, and other nations in Europe. Eugenics and nazism are rising alert among go people’s. heart.
Based on United Nations observer report, Qatar has a negative profile on giving equal access and enjoyment of rights between Qataris and long-term migrant workers. African and Asian people face challenges in accessing public spaces such as shopping centers, as opposed to Arab and white people. In 2021, Around 2 million migrant workers are employed in Qatar. The vast majority of low-wage laborers are from south Asia and east and west Africa. Low-wage workers continue to suffer severe discrimination and exploitation. The Qatar Government promises to make administrative measures and legislative policies to change the situation of the migrant worker’s working environment and ensure their rights. Qatar believes in addressing its challenges openly and has readily cooperated with its partners and critics to find practical longterm solutions. The Durban Declaration
In September this year, Qatar Participates in High-level Meeting to Celebrate the Anniversary of the Adoption of the Durban Declaration. Qatar is willing to collaborate with the international society, to continue implementing the DDPA and harness all potentials and energies to promote respect for human rights.
The solution proposed by the State of Qatar are listed as follows: (1 Urge the states of the world to encourage the Youth to fight racism, promotion national and international dialogue on xenophobia, exchanging information and building networks among them; (2) Urges States to facilitate the participation of people of African descent in all political, economic, social and cultural aspects of society; (3) Urge the states and World Health organization nidation, government sector and NGOS to prioritize health monitoring and testing, increase access to healthcare and provide targets information for those refugee.

Country:Qatar
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Sub-Saharan Africa hosts more than 26 percent refugees of the worlds. The movement of refugees has caused significant social and economic problems in Turkey and European nations like Germany and Greece. Around 6.3 million refugees are people who are outside of their country of origin and unable to return to the SubSahara area. The international society could not stand by allowing the was destroy the life and family of African descents.
Qatar has made a significant impact on changing refugees’ lives. Qatar charity made by the State of Qatar government has contributed US$47 million to UNHCR’s operations globally. Qatar has the interest to help provide a decent life for the needy around the world and empower them through improving education, health, and social services. Qatar is dedicated to achieving sustainable development goals on no poverty, Reduced Inequality, and Good Health and Wellbeing for Subsaharan areas. For the crisis of the Yemen war, Qatar signed a tripartite cooperation agreement worth USD 2.67 million with Qatar Fund For Development and Qatar Charity to help the suffering of more than 26,000 from the Yemen civil war.
Qatar is willing to collaborate with the international society, to continue providing humanitarian aid and all potentials and energies to promote respect for human rights. The solution proposed by the State of Qatar are listed as follows: (1) Urge the international body to give humanitarian aid to the regions and countries in the Subsaharan area regarding the refugee crisis to build hospitals, schools, and refugee camps; (2) Command the Red Cross, and NGOs to send equipment and medical support to the region of sub-Sarah are; (3) Calls upon the African state to develop the laws system and political measures for the refugee crisis in substrata area; (4) Urge the states to implement a legislative policy regarding asylum and refugee status to ensure their safety and access to food shelter and appropriate rights.

Country:Republic of Korea
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Republic of Korea is deeply concerned with the growth of racial discrimination, racism and xenophobia in the world and is working on reducing it within our country and in the international sphere. Since becoming a part of the UN in 1991, the Republic of Korea has adopted several resolutions concerning those topics. As a strong supporter of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Republic of Korea supports that everybody has the right to be treated equally and fairly. The Republic of Korea supports the United Nations efforts of the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) especially SDG 10 on reducing inequality within and among countries to combat inequality worldwide. The Republic of Korea continuously supports the United Nations efforts in installing measures to combat contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance with the Resolution 52/109 on the Elimination of Racism and Racial Discrimination, which was adopted by the General Assembly in 1997. The Republic of Korea strongly supports the Resolution 75/237 on United Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia, which was adopted in 2021. This Resolution reaffirms our efforts to eliminate racism and racial discrimination and our call for concrete actions globally. Furthermore, this Resolution underlines the need to promote tolerance, inclusion, and respect for diversity. The Republic of Korea is deeply concerned about the well being of our people, therefore we are working continually on a bill to outlaw discrimination to protect our people from any form of racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia.

Country:Republic of Korea
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The Republic of Korea firmly believes that as established by this body, that all refugees, returnees and displaced persons are deserving of basic human rights as well as the right to asylum as established by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Currently, there are more than 18 million displaced persons within Africa, 12 million of whom are internally displaced hence meaning that they have been displaced from their homes yet still reside within their country of origin. Furthermore, 26% of the world’s total refugee population live in Africa thus further emphasizing the dire importance of tackling this issue. The 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees calls on all member states to not discriminate against refugees as well as respect their right to asylum and essentially grant refugees the same rights as native citizens. The Republic of Korea, as a signatory to the Convention, reaffirms these principles and encourages other member states to do the same for the betterment of our world. Previously, this body has produced many resolutions to tackle refugee crises in Africa, especially that of A/RES/53/126 Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa. Reaffirming the sentiments of this resolution, adopted without vote in 1997, The Republic of Korea views this and other resolutions as the keys to success in terms of changing African lives for the better. Other resolutions such as A/RES/56/106 Assistance for humanitarian relief and the economic and social rehabilitation of Somalia have addressed specific refugee issues as they pertain to specific conflict areas. Ideally, future resolutions could adopt the same approach when applicable as sometimes more complex conflict zones require nuanced, targeted solutions as opposed to broad, overbearing solutions. The Republic of Korea however does recognize that in some instances broad action is required in order to address larger conflicts as a whole and certainly to tackle problems in a more conducive manner. The Republic of Korea is proud to have worked closely with African nations in the past as well as the African Development Bank in order to most effectively accomplish goals that benefit both the refugees but also work best to stabilize the economic and political future of the region. Previously, the Republic of Korea has signed onto resolutions encouraging repatriation of refugees when available as well as addressing the root causes of why refugees flee their native countries to begin with. The Republic of Korea believes that the most essential step to tackling these problems is to limit them before they start and address them as they arise, rather than to assign new home countries for refugees. Rather, refugees should have the opportunity to rebuild their home countries and make themselves home there again. Potential solutions that may solve these conflicts or at the very least help alleviate the issues that African refugees face differ in method and also differ in their applicability depending on the situation. The Republic of Korea believes that any solution to assisting African refugees, returnees and displaced persons should begin with financial assistance toward benevolent governments in the region in order to compensate for the amount of refugees that may migrate to those countries. Furthermore, the Republic of Korea believes that after conflicts are over that the United Nations as well as non-governmental organizations within the region should immediately begin the process of repairing the native countries of those afflicted as well as ensuring that conflict-affected countries are safe to live in. Therefore, an arrangement should ideally be made that would ensure that a neutral body could maintain and oversee a small peace-keeping force within afflicted countries just to maintain peace and order for repatriated refugees. This would greatly aid the world, the region and afflicted persons themselves.

Country:Russian Federation
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Human rights has been at the forefront of the UN’s mission since its conception after World War II. One main focus is the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. In the last several years, issues such as racially charged police brutality, racial and ethnically charged hate speech, and mistreatment of refugees globally have been on the rise. Currently the United States in particular is facing a large amount of criticism for the police brutality and rise of the neo-Nazi movement. However, despite the UN’s efforts to pass resolutions to help eradicate these issues, the United States has made it clear that they believe these resolutions are a violation of free speech. As we look at moving forward in the elimination of these issues, we must also look back on the lasting effects of colonialism and slavery. Descendants of those in the slave trade have begun to ask for reparations, however many former slaveholding countries are hesitant to grant them. The issues of racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia are not anything new. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on just how bad some of these issues are. Due to a lack of affordable healthcare and discrimination by healthcare providers, COVID-19 has disproportionately affected many racial minorities. The pandemic is also believed to be one of the main factors in the uptick of violent attacks towards those of Asian descent.

Country:Russian Federation
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Whether it be in times of war or trying to attain political asylum, we see kids, adults and even elderly seniors being part of groups being considered refugees, returnees and internally displaced persons. The term refugee shall mean every person who, owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of their nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail themselves of the protection of that country, or who, not having a nationality and being outside the country of their former habitual residence as a result of such events, is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to return to it. The term ‘refugee’ shall also apply to every person who, owing to external aggression, occupation, foreign domination or events seriously disturbing public order in either part or the whole of their country of origin or nationality, is compelled to leave their place of habitual residence in order to seek refuge in another place outside their country of origin or nationality. More and more we have seen on social media platforms and on news networks images, videos, and interviews of refugees, returnees, and internally displaced people that just want an opportunity in a better country for their well being. One of the main issues we see are children, who’s parents also want a better life for them. The numbers speak and they don’t lie. In this particular area, an estimated 7 million children are internally displaced, 1 in 4 migrants are children which happens to be more than twice globally, 1 in 2 refugees is a child. The UN have had resolutions which have helped not only this specific region but globally. There is more work to be done and I know the UN is more than capable of doing this.

Country:Saint Vincent & the Grenadines
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
As a world striving for peace, we need to make adjustments in order to pursue equality around the world. As Saint Vincent and the Grenadines our vision is improving the quality of life for all Vincentians, which is built on the principle of putting people at the center of its development. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines is a country full of people of many different races, cultures, and backgrounds. We will not stand for the mistreatment of any of our people. As Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, we suggest introducing programs that teach children not only their own culture(s) but also the cultures of the people living around them. These programs can be in the form of workshops or any interactive educational setting. By doing so children in primary education can begin their lives with an understanding of everyone around them. We also suggest creating programs that educate people on what bigotry, racism, and xenophobia are and how they impact people. With an education on these topic people are more appropriately informed and can make better decision on how to treat people who are different than them. People can begin recognizing bigotry, racism, and xenophobia when it happens in front of them and take appropriate actions, such as standing up for them when it matters. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines welcomes the UN’s support in creating effective programs to educate people around the world on the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerances.

Country:Saint Vincent & the Grenadines
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, there are currently programs for people seeking refugee status and asylum in the country. It is common many of our refugees are people who traveling through to North America. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines provides asylum- seekers and refugees with needed protection, including the issuance of work permits and the possibility to obtain a migrant status in the country. Furthermore, asylum-seekers have access to emergency care, general medicine, vaccinations and medical treatment related to women’s health. Asylum seekers also have access to free pre-school and primary education, and they can attend secondary school for US$100 per year. Refugees can receive vocational training for US$150 per year. We are aware of the many flaws in the process of our acceptance of refugees and asylum seekers, we plan on improving them in order to better support our region. We suggest that countries with the same capabilities pursue those same goals. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines recognizes the problem of statelessness within the Caribbean and wish to work together with allies and partners through the UNHCR in order to eliminate statelessness in our region by increasing efforts following the Global Action Plan to End Statelessness: 2014 – 2024.

Country:San Marino
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The refugee population in the area is small, which makes it a common concern; however, there have been records of increasing refugees averaging from December 1997 to 2016 with 19 observations. In the past, most refugees came from Italy, the Czech Republic, Brazil, and Mexico. The Republic of San Marino has approved legislation that enables families and single persons to host unaccompanied migrant minors living in refugee camps. According to the council of Europe Development Bank, as of 2015, San Marino contributed 20 000 euros to the Bank Migrant and Refugee Fund. San Marino is not included in the Geneva Convention of 1951 or the Protocol of 1967. However, the government still has a system in place for protecting refugees. This means that the San Marino government can protect refugees at risk of persecution based on race, religion, social group affiliation, political opinions, and more. By action of the cabinet, the government can grant refugee status or asylum to those seeking refuge in San Marino. Requests for asylum are rare. San Marino has met its responsibilities to welcome migrants, for instance, joining the Sant’Egidio Community project for "humanitarian corridors." San Marino has been active at the United Nations and in other multilateral organizations, participating in the OSCE Conference on "Large Movement of Migrants and Refugees in the Mediterranean." In addition to the most relevant recent initiatives, San Marino has contributed to the "Migrant and Refugees Fund" of the Council of Europe Development Bank.

Country:Serbia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Republic of Serbia is committed to the elimination of discrimination of any kind as there have been many anti-discrimination laws being passed since 2001. Externally The Republic of Serbia has supported anti-discriminatory law by being one of the first countries to ratify protocol 12 in the European Convention on Human Rights. This protocol sates that no right presented by law shall be secured by all people regardless of race, sex, color, language, religion, or cultural background. Similarly, Serbia is a party to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights. Articles 2 and 26 affirm the right to equal treatment and the right to equal protection before the law, without discrimination. The Republic of Serbia is also committed to the improvement of their current situation as there is a UN committee made up of 12 members called the UN Human Rights Unit in Serbia. This organization functions as an advisor to the government of the Republic of Serbia. An instance of this committee succeeding was with the advice of the committee in 2017 Serbia added amendments to their criminal code that held discrimination against women with disabilities in relation to rape. The Republic of Serbia encourages other member states to embrace anti-discrimination laws similar to the ones listed above such as the support of the United Nations Meetings Coverage (7 November 2019) in its efforts to combat the glorification of Nazism.

Country:Serbia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The Republic of Serbia has a reserved approach to the displaced people in Africa, there is limited potential in the Republic of Serbia and there are already 104,00 IDPs in Serbia and the needs of those people are a struggle to maintain, although legislation is working to alleviate this. Despite internal issues the Republic of Serbia is sympathetic to displaced people and promotes international legislation to support these people. For example, The Republic of Serbia allies with the United Nations, General Assembly (2020) Assistance to refugees, returnees, and displaced persons in Africa A/75/322. This covers a lot of the issues of displaced people but one of the most important being that it emphasizes the need for robust, well-functioning, concrete arrangements and potential, complementary mechanisms for ensuring predictable, equitable, efficient, and effective burden- and responsibility-sharing in the context of the global compact on refugees. The Republic of Serbia also encourages states that were a part of the 1951 convention regarding the status of refugees and the 1967 protocol to remember their obligations to uphold the rights of refugees internationally.  

Country:Somalia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Federal Republic of Somalia acknowledges the importance of the elimination of all forms of racial discrimination, and calls for continued protection for its people abroad. With more than 750,000 of our people refugees in neighboring countries, the Somali people are no foreigners to hateful xenophobia. In 2008, in South Africa, the world watched as Somalis were targeted and 60 people were tragically killed in a xenophobically motivated attack. Despite many Somalis in South Africa and other places establishing business and being productive members of a community, they are still targeted. Through continued relations with South Africa, amongst several international security institutions, efforts have greatly improved to better understand how to circumvent further acts of racially targeted violence against Somali people. While progress amongst member nations has been made, Somalia believes more work must be done to more thoroughly resolve this conflict.
In recognition of the continued violence many Somalis have felt abroad, Somalia acknowledges other foreigners ethnic groups experiencing similar discriminations and humanitarian injustices. With the implication of such policies such as the UN’s Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action, designed explicitly to remind nations of fighting against intolerance, we are eager and aware of the importance of eradicating racism, xenophobia, and all forms of ethnic violence. We will continue to unwaveringly recognize that countless may be in current situations of conflict, economic insecurity, and other instabilities that leave African nations in a dire situation. While viewing this topic as important and acknowledging the problem, Somalia is a nation that in the past has faced problems of instability, and crisis. Somalia continues to find itself in deep rooted political instability, following the recently postponed missed presidential election that has deeply angered many of our citizens. Somalia is committed to providing fair and free elections, and will continue to respect the inalienable right to free speech and demonstration. However, law will continue to be enforced in such a way that prioritizes individual liberty.
Moving towards the future, Somalia plans to keep the experiences of the past in mind and will work willingly with nations who hold similar beliefs of tolerance towards foreigners. Implementations of policies that help countries establish better policies for immigrants and citizen interactions will be viewed favorably. This would encourage the continued free practice of one's religion and culture. The preservation of Islamic belief during Samolis relocation to other countries is vital. While Somalia may be a smaller nation, it believes that collective action has the capacity to lead to policy solutions that prioritize and secure human rights of Somalis, and all individuals.

Country:Somalia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Somalia continues to recognize its responsibility to preserve the fundamental human rights, the rule of law, general standards of international law, justice, participatory, consultative and inclusive government in order to ensure accountability, efficiency, and responsiveness to the interests of all people within our sovereign land. This includes the basic liberties of internally displaced persons (IDP)–defined by UNHCR as those displaced due to armed conflict, violence, or human rights violations6–of which Somalia currently has approximately 2.9 million. Recent efforts have further indicated our unwavering and liberal support for these persons, such as the ratification of the Kampala Convention in November 2019, and the establishment of a Durable Solutions Secretariat (DSS) which “adopted a national IDP policy… designed to ensure that any evictions are carried out in a planned and legal way that protects the rights of displaced people.”
Despite our demonstrated commitments, several challenges currently face IDPs. This has included a proliferation in flooding, forced evictions, conflict between AMISOM and the Al- Shabaab extremist organization, and COVID-19. In 2020, UNHCR spent only 35% of its allocated budget for Somali IDPs. This is insufficient to stem the ever increasing crisis, and it is the position of this body that funds must increase. New guarantees on funding would be used in line with current UNHCR recommendations regarding “support with access to essential services, including education, vocational training, health care, and livelihoods.”
Additionally, Somalia recognizes imperative economic incentives to provide IDPs with opportunities for integration into labor markets. Definitive evidence supports immigrant and refugee labor-market integration policies capacity to lead to substantial economic growth. This has principally been demonstrated in Germany, who has experienced an estimated average GDP growth of 0.2 percentage points every year since 2015 due to immigration and refugee integration prioritizations. In light of current worldwide supply shortages, we believe that increased funding for labor integration programs could be met in return with the negotiation of priority trade agreements for sovereign lending countries. Additionally, provided funding and security for pathways to resettlement can be funded to further support the economic growth of Member States.
We look forward to collaborating with colleagues to find policy solutions that ensure the economic and humanitarian prosperity for all IDPs and our humble members.

Country:South Africa
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
We consider all the aspects of racism and xenophobia within and between the States, and continue to emphasize the significance of education and awareness about these issues. However, we must understand the acts of the individual to correct their intolerable behavior. In many ways, the seemingly xenophobic ideologies exhibited by citizens across the globe are largely entrenched in individual identities, and therefore, cannot be merely solved by one governmental entity. Still, States have an obligation to protect its citizens and set a moral precedent. Thus, we must change these behaviors through education. With recent legislation such as our National Action Plan to Combat Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance, South Africa dedicates itself to combating this issue. The plan provides assistance to States in “giving effect to their international human rights obligations,” brings together stakeholders to discuss these challenges, and monitors on- going incidents of racism. We support related measures, such as Resolution 75/237, to eradicate racism as an international community. Furthermore, we believe accountability is a crucial step to address these issues—and reparations are an important part of that process.
In 2003, we made payments to around 19,000 victims of apartheid, giving approximately 571.5 million rand in reparations. We believe States can learn from our dealings with apartheid to promote healing in their own communities. We encourage the international community to take necessary action in addressing the torment of racism and xenophobia. We firmly support comprehensive education plans on racial intolerance to change the attitudes surrounding our communities.

Country:South Africa
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
For decades, Sub-Saharan Africa has been an epicenter for internationally and internally displaced persons. After a brief period of waning in the early 2000s, the number refugees from Sub-Saharan Africa has been rising again over the past decade, resulting in human rights abuses and humanitarian crises across the continent of Africa. African states have taken steps, such as the 2009 Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, to attempt to resolve issues surrounding the regional and internal unrest; however, our continent still lacks the resources, solutions, and long-term international support to fully address this displacement crisis. States surrounding the sub- Saharan region continue to struggle to support the many refugees who are forced to cross boarders and often face rejection from citizens in their host countries. As the numbers of internally and internationally displaced persons in Africa rise, and are expected to continue to rise due to the effects of global, anthropogenic climate change, it is increasingly difficult for host nations to sustain an orderly registration and immigration processes. Refugees on the continent often face prolonged waiting periods in refugee camps and become restless under strained living conditions. For this reason, South Africa seeks to secure long-term solutions aimed at stabilizing the sub-Saharan region through monetary support and international cooperation. Furthermore, we support the idea of coordination efforts by U.N. member states to commit to an organized relocation program that spreads relocation of displaced persons more evenly, allowing host states to process the growing number of displaced persons more efficiently and effectively so that the rights and wellbeing of host country citizens and displaced persons may be equitably protected and prioritized.

Country:Sweden
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Kingdom of Sweden proudly recognizes freedom of religion as a pillar of civil societies. Sadly, religious intolerance is still to blame for much of human suffering, and for the endangerment of human intellectual diversity. Notably, the rise in religious terrorism has fueled poverty, refugee crises, schisms, and more violence—which all present a threat to the security and prosperity of the European Union, and of humanity. Therefore, it is vital to emphasize the direct connection between confronting religious intolerance and counter- terrorism efforts. The Kingdom of Sweden participates in the Global Coalition against Daesh and welcomes similar and broader initiatives. Sweden and the United Nations strive to defend articles 18 and 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the adoption of the Declaration on Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief in 1981, the work of the special rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief, and the global efforts aiming to implement these values. Defending human rights is a cornerstone of Swedish foreign policy, but more strategic efforts are needed to confront this urgent task. Many victims of religious terror and prosecution are marginalized groups in need of aid and advocacy. During the 2020 Ministerial Conference to Advance Freedom of Religion or Belief, Sweden condemned the suppression of dissenting and minority voices. The Kingdom welcomes global collaboration to support these groups and strengthen democracy in countries with authoritarian tendencies. Sweden is honored to work with the Organization of Islamic Cooperation; and encourages partners and fellow states to invest in similar relations. Sweden upholds protecting freedom of religion at the core of Swedish values—committed to its promotion across national, regional, and international platforms—through advocacy, diplomacy, and socio-economic aid. Specifically, Sweden advocates for the creation and promotion of unique immigration and scholarship programs—to serve and invest in individuals, particularly women, who exhibit leadership and courage in this field. One path to coexistence is leadership that honors bravery, and pluralism. Therefore, Sweden invites Member States to implement additional and wiser efforts to discourage blasphemy and apostasy laws; and to foster interfaith dialogues where it is needed most.
The international community must not take free speech and freedom of religion for granted, and must strive for peace and prosperity for all, even in times of turmoil. Hence, the community has a moral obligation to maintain freedom of religion as a pillar of humanity. Sweden is open to support and enhance initiatives such as the Rabat Plan of Action, which emphasizes the important role women’s education plays in promoting religious freedom and tolerance. The kingdom pledges to stand up for the right to freedom of expression, opinion, political dissent, religion, or belief—whenever called upon.

Country:Sweden
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
Currently, over 18 million people in Sub-Saharan Africa are of concern to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR). The region hosts more than 26 per cent of the world’s refugee population —due to poverty, corruption, and terrorism. Despite the great amount of development and military aid already invested, much of the region is still unstable. The Kingdom of Sweden and the European Union are strongly committed to bettering these conditions. In 2016, Sweden presented a 5-year strategy and commitment to the regional development cooperation in Sub-Saharan Africa. Accordingly, the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency is working on effectively investing and allocating financial aid—to prevent armed conflicts and strengthen democracy, economy, and climate in the region. The human conscience should not rest while the lives and dignities of humankind are suffering this crisis. We call upon our partners outside of the EU to increase their support; for if the situation is not contained, we shall all suffer the consequences as a global community.
The Kingdom honors the Kampala convention, and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). Sweden is a supporter of the Power Africa initiative and emphasizes the need for similar collaborations to better the conditions of the poorest in the region, and to invest in women’s education and healthcare. Furthermore, the Kingdom invites fellow states to reinforce aid towards increasing the awareness of sexual and reproductive health rights, and to support government-led population and family planning in the region. Lastly, Sweden would like to highlight gender-equality, economic opportunity, freedom, and dignity as essential factors of the solution to the refugee and displaced persons crisis in Africa. The Kingdom therefore invites the international community to invest in democracy and human rights—as they can bridge the gap to development and security in the region; and put us on the right side of history in the face of this great concern and uncertainty.

Country:Thailand
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Thailand firmly agrees that racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance exist and should be eliminated. For many decades, Thailand has been supportive of the equality of people, and religion, without being discriminative. We respect the different values of a diverse society. The National Human Rights Action Plan of Thailand had been coordinated three times by the Department of Rights and liberties Protections and the Ministry of Justice aimed to promote the acceptance of different races, languages, religions, and ethnic groups. The first National Human Rights Action Plan was established between 2001-2005, following the second action plan between 2009-2013 and the third action plan between 2014-2018. Through all the three action plans, Thailand has raised awareness and understanding the human rights by conducting training, providing the handbook materials, and evaluating the Nation Human Rights Plan at all national levels. Thailand has prohibited hate speech under the Computer Crimes Act of 2007 and the International Security Act of 2008 and insulting others under the Thai Criminal code. The Ministry of Public health has also implemented equal access for migrants to ensure that they got the same treatment as the Thai residents by providing universal health coverage for the registered migrants and promoting the participation of migrants in looking after their family health.
Thailand has determined to implement and eliminate racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. However, many obstacles and dilemmas have occurred such as lack of human and financial resources, lack of support and participation from agencies in monitoring human rights. Thus, we strongly believe that the international community should provide more attention and support to Thailand. Thailand supports the UN International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination and the World conference against racism. At the same time, Thailand urges the United Nation to implement and monitor the Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council.

Country:Thailand
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
It is undeniable that refugees, returnees, and displaced persons need to be assisted appropriately. More than 70 million people were forced to displace in 2018, which included 25.9 million refugees. 84% of the refugees got sheltered from the developing countries and most of them are considered fragile. The International Rescue Committee (IRC) has been working in Thailand since 1975 to help refugees from Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam. The IRC has also assisted the refugees from Myanmar since 1992. The Thai government offers the displaced persons from Myanmar refuge, who are fleeing due to conflict, and provides a fair procedure to determine the new asylum seekers. In 2021, the government has assisted more than 92,000 refugees from Myanmar due to the civil war. While the world is trying to tackle the covid-19, many people are forcibly displaced. The Thai government has cooperated with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), and humanitarian organizations in response to the COVID-19 such as, providing free access to health care, free COVID-19 testing, food assistance, and protection to all the refugees and asylum seekers.
Thailand strongly supports the UN human rights statement which emphasizes that in response to the COVID-19, the emergency response must be non-discriminatory to all the displaced persons. To ensure that refugees needs are being assisted, we, Thailand, urge the UN to support and aid both financial and political agencies for these efforts. Violence and abuse against the citizens should be prohibited and ended. We support the UN Global Compact on Refugees and the 2030 Agenda. At the same time, Thailand asks the UN to urge the Refugee Convention to bring more transparency and refugees' rights.

Country:Togo
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Racism, xenophobia, and similar types of discrimination have been prevalent in global society for thousands of years. Although the prominence of racism in Togo may be lower than in other countries, we are not turning a blind eye to these issues. Our government has taken great strides to combat racial discrimination here at home as well as outside our borders. After a long period of civil unrest in the 1990s and 2000s, we have bounced back as a country and taken action in the fight for human rights. In 2007, the Office of the High Commissioner of Human Rights was established, kick-starting our legal and societal progress on combating racism, and our Committee for Human Rights has had a specific focus on the issues of racism and racial discrimination. In the past years, we have helped further international progress by ratifying several human rights treaties and participating in the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination. Inside our borders, colorism specifically is not a large issue; however, ethnic, regional, and tribal disputes take a more prominent place in our society. Following our duties of the convention, we are creating and implementing many methods to combat racism and ethnic discrimination amongst our people, such as awareness campaigns, anti-discrimination labor laws, and seminars. We would be interested in furthering our collaboration with other countries in the fight against racism, and are open to trying out new ideas to help put a stop to ethnic prejudice.

Country:Togo
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The issue of refugees, returnees, and displaced persons in Africa is something that Togo takes seriously, given our location in Africa. As a country with about 2000 internally displaced persons as of 2019, we recognize the need for assistance for those displaced by conflicts. In addition, as a country that has had thousands of refugees leave in the past, we believe in the necessity of assistance to these refugees to both return to their homes and make a new life. As of 2015, the nearby country of Ghana is working to help 2300 Togolese refugees that have immigrated, and the UN High Commission for Refugees has been funding this. Because our refugees have been helped as they’ve left the country, Togo would like to help other refugees and displaced persons through similar programs. Having seen firsthand the problems that refugees and internally displaced persons face, through reports and resolutions during our election violence in 2005, we are committed to helping other countries. Despite our rocky past with internally displaced persons and refugees, as evidenced by the Resolution on the Human Rights Situation in Togo (2005), we have since been committed to helping those affected by statelessness. For example, Togo has joined the 1954 Convention on the Status of Stateless Persons as well as the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. Togo is clearly committed to ending the problem of statelessness, and is therefore open to providing greater assistance to refugees and internally displaced persons. As a part of this committee, we hope to give further assistance through resolutions to internally displaced persons within countries’ borders, to refugees in Africa, and those returnees in Africa.

Country:Tunisia
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
As we move forward as a global community, there is more and more understanding shared between nations and peoples. Tunisia stands in solidarity with those who are being trodden upon based on race, ethnicity, and other aspects of an individual's makeup. The previously convened International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination (1965) on human rights that, as the backbone for future battles against discrimination has the full support of Tunisia. Standing united with resolution 68/151, in which the United Nations adopted global efforts to stop xenophobia, racism, and other forms of discrimination in the world today. Despite ongoing efforts, the issue of racism and xenophobia persists. Expanding on such focuses like RES/68/151 would allow the global community to better understand one another, and the individual citizens living within their state’s sovereign boundaries. Tunisia understands the need to protect individuals being mistreated on racial grounds, so would be open to creation of a resolution that enables discriminated individuals to speak out on their troubles. Offering them a platform to speak from should be a main goal of the UN going forward, and the republic of Tunisia hopes that other member states would agree. Believing that there is intrinsic good in the global community, there needs to be levels of assessment within which hate crimes are perpetrated throughout the world. In which, the UN can act accordingly and send aid when need be. Observing that there are many nuances to this issue, but even smaller scale hate ideals/organizations should not be tolerated in the contemporary world. Current goals of eliminating racial and ethnic intolerance still have not been fully met by the perspective of Tunisia and reiterates its unwavering commitment to put an end to such an issue around the world.

Country:Tunisia
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As nations of the world have come together as a global community there has been a need for states to welcome individuals of disputing states, discrimination, and other various examples of hardships. It is with those open arms that the UN member states exhibit the compassion and empathy needed to move the world forward. The Republic of Tunisia agrees with A/RES/71/237 which upholds the UN’s ideals of a sustainable world, in which refugees and returnees of any nation should be protected under international law. The Republic of Tunisia believes that this resolution benefits all members of the United Nations to take part in aiding displaced persons for multiple different fashions. Holding the belief that allowing for the UN to push forward and stronger define these “protections” will allow nations to better represent themselves according to international law. Tunisia also believes that implementation of guidelines and procedures will help displaced individuals in Africa, and continued support is a priority within this issue. Maybe offering less restrictions for traveling individuals between states if they are fleeing under distress. Better define A/RES/71/237, which will benefit any individual possibly being displaced anywhere in the world. As a state that does offer aid to neighboring refugees, we have first-hand experience in what can make a difference for displaced individuals. As well as drafting resolutions to stop displacement in its tracks and send aid to communities living within warring/conflicting states. Tunisia would also like to see some precautions taken place. Displacement will happen, and the United Nations can create a committee specifically formatted to determine when and where displacement of individuals will occur. Continuing forward with this discussion is important to not only the health of African states, but the global community as well.

Country:Turkey
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Turkey is dedicated to enhancing and developing ways to eliminate racial discrimination and other intolerances which plague the global community. In this committee, we plan on developing resolutions which champion nations rights to have independence within their borders in order to develop domestic laws to address specific cultural problems regarding discrimination. Ultimately, we believe it is the role of the United Nations to support nations who are taking actions to strengthen domestic laws. Turkey is proud to have a strong leader in Recep Erdogan, who is dedicated to maintaining order within the nation regarding racial discrimination and intolerance generally. Further, we suggest other leaders should model our nation's leadership through adopting a strong stance on civil disobedience. Modeling our leadership would allow other nations to reap the benefits of a more stable state which is not constantly fighting a domestic political battle. Without taking a similar stance, we believe the global community will have a much harder time addressing the elimination of a variety of different intolerances which the committee has been established to address.

Country:Turkey
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
As the evolving issues in Africa create more and more displaced persons, Turkey is faced with an almost impossible decision. Turkey is currently facing their own issues regarding the aid and handling of displaced persons as a result of the Syrian civil war. Now with the United States withdrawal from Afghanistan, there is even more flooding of refugees into the Turkish province of Kili which is now home to 105,000 Syrian refugees. Turkey is willing to give aid to said displaced refugees from Africa, however we are not in the position to be expected to carry out the majority of aid missions. We feel as if countries in the E.U. should reciprocate their words with actions. The general consensus has been that the E.U. will provide aid, but has not followed up with action taken to ensure the safety and relocation of the African persons seeking refuge. Turkey will present aid, only under the condition that we receive aid with our own refugee issues. Our people are exhausted and ask for aid at home to deal with the rising number of Syrian refugees before we are able to extend an outstretched hand to the African refugees.

Country:Turkmenistan
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The delegation of Turkmenistan is committed to the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. Our Constitution guarantees all citizens equality before the law, regardless of race, nationality, skin color, gender, origin, property and official status, place of residence, language, religion, political beliefs, and other circumstances. Additionally, the Criminal Code of Turkmenistan and the Code of Administrative Offenses both make it illegal to incite social, national, or religious enmity. The Criminal Code also makes it illegal to degrade national dignity and to propagate superiority or inferiority among citizens based on religion, nationality, ethnicity, or race, with the goal of preventing hate speech. On the international scale, Turkmenistan was a co-author of the United Nations General Assembly resolution on the fight against the glorification of Nazism, neo-Nazism, and other practices that contributed to the fueling of contemporary forms of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance, which was adopted in 2014.
Additionally, in recent years, Turkmenistan has made substantial progress towards the elimination of racism, racial discrimination, and xenophobia in our country. National legislation has been reformed, and institutions for the protection and promotion of human rights have been established to combat human trafficking and implement international humanitarian law. In accordance with recommendations received from United Nations treaty organizations and through the Universal Periodic Review process, concrete efforts are being taken to implement those essential strategic documents. For example, a road map for implementing the National Human Rights Action Plan was established, which highlights key ministries accountable for certain actions. It also includes two actual projects, one with the Supreme Court of Turkmenistan to improve the role of law enforcement organizations in promoting human rights and the other to protect the population by improving the law on citizens' employment and labor rights. Indicators for monitoring the National Action Plan's execution were also devised, and Turkmenistan has been working to create a single system for monitoring and evaluating all human rights protection procedures. In the future, Turkmenistan is committed to working with the United Nations to continue promoting tolerance and equality both domestically and abroad.

Country:Turkmenistan
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
In 1997, Turkmenistan adopted the Refugee Law (last amended in 2017) which determines the procedure for granting refugee status, protection provisions, the legal status of persons granted refugee status, legal and economic standards, and social guarantees for the protection of the rights of persons granted refugee status. In 2000, the net migration rate was 2.2 migrants per 1,000 population. While the number of refugees and asylum seekers from Turkmenistan was 323 in 2000, this number increased to 804 in 2010 and to 1,680 in 2018. Since 2016, Turkmenistan has taken in no African refugees. Most of those how seek asylum in Turkmenistan include refugees from Afghanistan, Iran, and Russia. For an individual to seek asylum in Turkmenistan, they must be approved by the State Migration Service of Turkmenistan. However, Turkmenistan is not allowed to take in these refugees because Turkmenistan has been deemed an unsafe place to live, during the COVID-19 era. Turkmenistan has taken multiple precautions to make certain that COVID-19 does not spread in Turkmenistan. Our delegation believes that our country should be deemed safe as Turkmenistan has reported zero COVID-19 cases and the Turkmenistani government can provide housing and other benefits to these displaced persons. Turkmenistan believes that those refugees or displaced persons in Africa are welcome in Turkmenistan, pending approval.
As a result of there being an increase of immigrants as more and more years go on, the number of refugees or those seeking asylum in Turkmenistan has remained steady and slowly increasing. As the number of refugees, returnees, and displaced persons from Africa have increased, it is imperative that the U.N deems Turkmenistan a safe place to seek asylum. The UN sending refugees to Turkmenistan can help decrease the number of refugees that are awaiting asylum and provide a safe place for refugees to live.

Country:Uganda
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
As one contends against the immeasurable suffering brought by exclusion, alienation, and intolerance, they would swiftly arrive at the notion that racism, in its most basic form, summarizes everything that a human should rebel against to maintain a minimal state of principle and dignity. Alas, erroneous ideals have often led us to perpetuate catastrophic stereotypes that caused acts of discrimination to not merely materialize sporadically but to become factually fused with our interpretations of normalcy. Uganda is certainly not a stranger to bigotry, nor can we claim perfection in our past endeavors toward resolving it, however, we can proudly assert that we have made progress in helping those affected by prejudice to feel slightly more accepted. Assuringly, our goals are far more ambitious. While we are cognizant of the psychological literature on mental functioning, and aware that a person can not sensibly be devoid of biases, we plan to generate a system, with the aid of other nations, that does not allow one’s preconceptions on another’s race, ethnicity, culture, or religion to ever be operationalized in a harmful manner. Uganda has already begun its fight against racism, evidenced by the United Nations’ International Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Racial Discrimination CERD/C/62/CO/11 2 June 2003, where we publicly shared our plans and welcomed feedback on them. Our presence in this committee stands to represent Ugandan ideals that have been nurtured for generations by our people and culture, for we believe in prosperity for all persons. In our nation, we often say “Ask help from the spirits after having used all your strength”. Our strength to fight racism is boundless, and it shall prevail, for it does not only stand by itself, but is hopefully backed by the collective agreement of all nations present, that racism is humanity’s worst enemy.

Country:Uganda
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The conception of the United Nations was designed with the idea to bring about a peaceful world. One where a child need not suffer the loss of a parent, where friendships are not threatened by the deafening sound of a fired bullet, and lastly, where life can be treasured in a way that allows it to realize adequate completion. Uganda has historically, despite the tragedies that haunted us throughout time, been always committed to safeguarding the survivability of those who found themselves forcibly thrown away from their homes. We are concerned with the situation in Africa, and had previously voiced our support for humanitarian offers in the United Nations. We have been active participants in accepting refugees from any disabled country, specifically those within the continent. However, as we proceed forward, a certain degree of cognizance of others’ calibers and abilities is paramount for a feasible plan to surface. Uganda, despite its goal to preserve a family’s unison, to hinder the horrid effects of war, to hijack the dreams of children and to stand by what believe to the United Nations core missions, we are simply incapable of granting everyone permission to come into our land. Simply because we would not be able to establish a guarantee on offering a decent quality of life. Similar to many others, we remain limited in our resources, land and technology to accommodate the collective needs of everyone.

Country:United States of America
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
Addressing and eliminating any type of racism, racial discrimination and xenophobia is a critical goal for the United States to reach, being a key aspect in both domestic and forign policy. The United States strives to support marginalized populations globally by supporting organizations that seek to empower racial and ethnic minority communities. In recent months, domestic agencies have taken appropriate steps to ensure that official actions, documents, and statements, including those that pertain to the COVID-19 pandemic, do not exhibit or contribute to racism and xenophobia against these specific communities. The United States has strongly condemned discrimination and racially motivated hate against the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic as well. The United States’ Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice also may investigate and bring suits against agencies that engage in, or exhibit patterns or adopt practices of, racial profiling in violation of the Constitution.
The United States urges other nations in this body to not pull back in fear of scrutiny of their past racial injustices and instead, be able to acknowledge them with virtuous intent to improve. The United States would also like to encourage and urge all nation states to adopt the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination to ensure that all rights of every individual are upheld to the highest ethical standard. The United States looks forward to working with the nation states in attendance today to make sure we uphold these human rights standards.

Country:United States of America
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The United States of America realizes that refugees, returnees, and displaced persons have been an issue that many nation states have had to deal with in the past and still do to this day. The United States of America defines refugees as people who are fleeing their home countries due to persecution, war, or violence. Along with refugees come returnees; people who go back to their home countries after being absent for a period of time. This lack of knowledge and education has played a major role in the decisions that nation states such as the United States have made. The United States of America acknowledges that over 25.9 million refugees worldwide continue to suffer as a result of improper or inadequate living options. Taking this knowledge into account, the United States of America alone has provided resettlement to 30,000 refugees in 2019 alone. The United States has created an additional process to admit and resettle refugees that differs from the UNHCR screening process. Once the refugee is approved the United States of America then assigns the case to one of nine U.S NGOs.
The United States of America encourages its fellow nation states to adopt programs and non-profit organizations such as the ones that are in place for them. Once programs such as the ones stated before are in place, handling the refugee crisis may become a little easier for states around the world. However, the United States of America understands that all nations may not have the financial resources to do what they would like when it comes to handling this world wide issue. With that being said the United States asks for nation states to aid one another in this battle.

Country:Uzbekistan
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The threat of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and other related intolerances are very present throughout the world today. These types of horrible acts, like police brutality in the United States or LGTBQ beatings in Spain, happen in every country in some capacity. When there is a presence of intolerance towards a group of people, there is a risk that a particular group will not receive human rights. These acts also threaten the stability of a country or region with the perceived threat that they might turn into violence against any group. This is why the elimination of these intolerances is an essential part of the United Nations' goal for ensuring everyone has human rights.
The General Assembly Third Committee was founded directly after the conclusion of the second world war. The United Nations Charter, created in 1945, asserted that fundamental rights are given to every person regardless of race, religion, ethnicity, or origin. Even with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948, these intolerances continued to persist in the world from events such as the “swastika epidemic” in 1959 and apartheid in South Africa. These events caused the creation of the United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination in 1963 and the International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination just two years later. Since then, the United Nations has gone on to host the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action that ended apartheid and three World Conferences Against Racism in 1978, 1983, and 2001.
The World Conference in 2001 was the last of its kind due to many complications that arose throughout. The conference in South Africa looked as if it were to solve many issues regarding indigenous people and refugees, particularly of African descent. The conference ended due to a disagreement over reparations and multiple accusations of antisemitism amongst different member states and non-governmental organizations. This lead to the withdrawal of Israel and the United States from the conference and while it has been revisited in 2009 and 2011, no concrete plan has been addressed. In the 21st Century, the third committee of the United Nations has been concerned with addressing hate speech and violence. With the rise of Covid-19, the committee has taken it upon themselves to address the increased racial-related attacks against people of Asian descent. What is also on top of the committee's list is handling attacks from anti-Semitic people and an increase in racist ideology on social media. This is a brief historical overview of the third committee of the United Nations and its impact on the world dealing with intolerances.
Since Uzbekistan became a member of the United Nations, it has always tried to adopt and implement resolutions set forth by the United Nations. With the election of Shavkat Mirziyoyev in 2016, the country has made significant strides to implement even more resolutions set forth by the United Nations. In the 30 years since it declared sovereignty, Uzbekistan has only become a better nation. Currently, Uzbekistan is on many different United Nations committees including, the Human Rights Council. Uzbekistan is extremely proud of this accomplishment proud accomplishment.
While this is not the Human Rights Council, this committee has many overlapping parts from each. Uzbekistan stands with the majority of member-states of the United Nations with ending racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and other related intolerances. Uzbekistan will continue to work with the existing partners in the region and as well as internationally. We aim to work with countries primarily in Central Asia, but also with countries such as Russia and the United States that play an important role on the international stage. Overall, Uzbekistan stands with the United Nations and its goal to end intolerances towards people.
The fight to end these intolerances has the support of virtually every country, including Uzbekistan. The country stands with those who want to tackle this serious issue that plagues many to this day. Uzbekistan has been combatting these intolerances in its own country for over thirty years and will continue this fight on the international stage.

Country:Uzbekistan
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
There has been an ongoing problem of refugees and displaced people throughout the world, and one of these places of this is Africa. In 2019 alone, there were 33.4 million dislocated persons in sub-Saharan Africa. That number is unfortunately up from 26.4 million the year before, which means sub-Saharan Africa has more dislocated people than any other region in the world. Many of these people have been dislocated for several reasons including armed conflicts, climate change, human trafficking, and economic recessions. This impacts millions of people and is an issue that needs to be addressed immediately by the international community. The United Nations first convened a conference in 1951 which lead to the signing of the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. The convention was able to define the term refugee and outlined the rights of each refugee. The only downside was that it only applied to protecting European refugees in the aftermath of World War II. In 1967, The United Nations member states recognized this fault and eliminated the geographical portion so the term could apply to those anywhere. This led the Organization of African Unity to convene and administer this to all African member states. Even with its ratification, it proved to be a challenge to implement and has led to many current problems on the continent to persist or worsen. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, there was an increase in civil wars on the continent. These armed conflicts led escalated the number of refugees and internally displaced people (IDP). During this time, the United Nations did what the organization could by sending aid to places that needed it and even authorizing the use of force in some areas like Rwanda and Somalia. It wasn’t until 1992 when the United Nations adopted its first resolutions regarding refugees, returnees, and displaced people in Africa. This resolution had to be reconstructed in the following years to include more about internally displaced people because much of the original resolution dealt with displaced people across borders. In 1998, the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement was submitted to the United Nations and provided a plan that ensured that refugees and internally displaced people were receiving the same assistance.
As the 2000s came about, the concern for IDPs grew. From 2000-2008, the number of refugees decreased by 1.3 million while the number of IDPs went up by 2 million. This alarming growth was observed by countries and led to the Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, also known as the Kampala Convention, in 2009. This addressed the issues for internal displacement and as of 2020, is currently ratified by 31 African countries. The Kampala Convention, unfortunately, failed to implement its plan, and currently, the continent host about a third of the world's IDPs. This number will only continue to grow in the coming years and is why this issue should be immediately addressed by the international community.
Uzbekistan shares the concerns with the international community for both refugees and internally displaced people. The country sees this as an extensive dilemma the world deals with today, and Uzbekistan does what it can for those who need it. In recent years, Uzbekistan has taken on several refugees from the Syrian Civil War, and with the current conflict in Afghanistan, the country can no longer take any refugees. Regardless, Uzbekistan sees the issue and would like to work with others to solve this issue.
One idea Uzbekistan wants to work on is the Convention for the Protection and Assistance of Internally Displaced Persons in Africa, also known as the Kampala Convention. Currently, there are only 31 of the 55 states who have chosen to ratify. Uzbekistan recognizes the importance of the Kampala Convention and would like to work to increase the number of states who ratified it. While Uzbekistan may lack the connections in Africa to implement this plan, our allies, such as China, Russia, and the United States, do not. We intend to start a coalition that would band these countries together, which could presumably lead to a significant decrease in refugees and IDPs in Africa.
Uzbekistan recognizes refugees and IDPs as a substantial issue for the United Nations to address, particularly with the substantial increase over the past few years. The country wants to combat this rise because the number of dislocated people will continue to grow with other impending factors which also must be dealt with. Uzbekistan understands just how much a dilemma this is and wants to contribute to solving it.

Country:Venezuela
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela recognizes the importance of eliminating racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerances. In recent years, there has been a spike of intolerance that has plagued the international community. The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela has also felt this wave of increased intolerance in the past years. Our people have faced intolerance and prejudice around the world. We firmly believe that as a community it is important to address this problem head-on. We must protect our citizens from discrimination and intolerance. One way we can make an impact in helping curb racial intolerance is by increasing representation with our leaders in the international community. The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela recognizes that representation in leadership positions is important, and we have worked to provide representation by reserving parliamentary seats for indigenous people. Having better representation in our community and leadership positions will help create a more diverse forum; where we can hear from those who are experiencing these acts of discrimination firsthand. Our leaders must represent and reflect our people not only in beliefs and ideologies, but also in gender, racial, and ethnic identities. Another way we can help curb these acts of intolerance is by enacting laws against racial discrimination, xenophobia, and related intolerance. The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela sees this as a top priority, as President Nicolas Maduro has said “the time has come to, through a great political process of awareness-raising, punish hate crimes and intolerance in all forms of expression.” In recent years, we have passed laws against intolerance. In 2017 we passed the Law Against Hatred. By creating laws against racial discrimination, xenophobia, and other related intolerances we are showing our community that we will not tolerate these attacks on our citizens. The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela understands the importance of preventing acts of intolerance and providing a safe community for all.

Country:Venezuela
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela recognizes the importance of assisting refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa. In the past, Venezuela has graciously welcomed and has participated in assisting refugees from around the world. There are more than 68 million people who are forcibly displaced worldwide, and more than a third of these people are in Africa. This includes 6.3 million refugees and asylum seekers and 14.5 million displaced persons. Unfortunately, the refugee assistance problem is not limited to the continent of Africa. In recent years, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela has also faced hardship. There are over five million Venezuelan refugees living abroad, yet there is a lack of assistance to them. This is one of the largest current displacement issues in the entire world, yet there is little help for our citizens. The United States has particularly tried to keep our citizens outside of their borders. The entirety of the European Union has not taken our situation into consideration, and instead met Venezuela with intolerance. Our people have faced intolerance and prejudice around the world. The Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela understands the importance of helping the international community, and we ask the same be done for our citizens.

Country:Zimbabwe
Topic: Elimination of racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance
Paper text:
The phenomenon of racism and xenophobia have been the unfortunate foundations for the systemic structures within societies throughout the world for centuries. Racism and xenophobia have created systems within nations that directly enforce ideology that produces and maintains trauma and inequality to flourish. Zimbabwe urges the member countries of the UN general council to greatly consider the ramifications of continuing to ignore the destruction that racism and xenophobia creates, and to consider an alternative way of living that promotes a just and peaceful society.
Racial oppression has existed internally within the country of Zimbabwe since the rule of the British South Africa Company (BSAC) in the 1800s. Evidence of such racial tension can be seen within the historical ratification of the country’s 1961 constitution, which promoted the white supremacy rule of a white regime at the expense of a racially diverse majority population. Zimbabwe acknowledges accountability for its own history of apartheid and systemic racism and believes that reparations to the victims are necessary in order to fully combat racist ideology. Zimbabwe has claimed to “be counted on and indeed commits itself to be on the front line and never to abandon its post.” In addition to the country’s commitment to the elimination of racism and racial discrimination, Zimbabwe has shown great interest in fighting against xenophobia and related intolerance. In 2019, Zimbabwe assisted in the evacuation of 171 individuals over matters of xenophobic violence within the country of South Africa.
Zimbabwe has signed the 1997 amendment to the Ombudsman’s Act, which broadened the previous stance made by the signing of the Prevention of Discrimination Act of 1998 to “include investigation of any violations of human rights committed by members of the defense and police forces and the prison service”. Further, Zimbabwe has participated in the signing of the UN’s Political Declaration in 2009, wherein world leaders proclaimed "strong determination to make the fight against racism, racial discrimination, xenophobia and related intolerance, and the protection of the victims thereof, a high priority for [their] countries”.
Zimbabwe offers the following recommendations to combat racism and xenophobia to member countries of the UN general council: implement systemic intervention at the governmental level to analyze policies for promoting racist and xenophobic thought, address the racial segregation that exists within the education of school systems, offer reparations to victims of racist and xenophobic injustices, and advocate for peacebuilding within conflict zones. Zimbabwe believes that these recommendations are achievable through the accountability by a respected third party of government officials to implement and enforce just policies.

Country:Zimbabwe
Topic: Assistance to refugees, returnees and displaced persons in Africa
Paper text:
The wellbeing of displaced persons and refugees is a highly critical issue that deserves a prominent position on the world stage. Estimates from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees show that over 80 million people have been forced to leave their homes and about 26 million of them are individuals under the age of 18. This larger context, therefore, helps us understand the precarious state that our nation of Zimbabwe is in. Until the 1990s, Zimbabwe was one of the wealthiest countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Since then, the Zimbabwean government and its citizens have been through extensive economic and social struggles. These challenges have led to many citizens choosing to emigrate with over a millions Zimbabweans leaving their home country for the borders of neighboring countries like South Africa.
This emigration challenge has put our country in an unfortunate situation especially with regards to our migration management capacity, the continued denial of asylum seekers by the countries they are seeking refuge in and the loss of global remittances which would have a positive impact on the Zimbabwean economy. The Zimbabwe Mission of the International Organisation of Migration has been one of the agencies that has assisted with this crisis in our country since 1985 by establishing multiple offices in Harare, Bulawayo, Mutare, Beitbridge and Plumtree. In collaboration with the IOM, the Zimbabwean government is affirming the need for emergency and humanitarian assistance, (re)integration and/or resettlement assistance, migration health, counter- trafficking, and migration management policy framework. Our government also affirms the need for the health of migrants to be an immediate concern and is encouraging the governments of the Netherlands, Switzerland, Sweden, United States of America to continue with their much needed financial assistance to support migrant health.
In addition to the above issues that our government is calling attention to, the people of Zimbabwe would like to highlight the important place that global remittances have in our economy. As of 2020, the World Bank reported that over 7% of Zimbabwe's Gross domestic product (GDP) was from global remittances. This figure highlights the important place these resources have in the economy and we are urging both Zimbabweans in the diaspora and the governments that are hosting them to continue to allow the seamless transfer of financial resources to Zimbabwe. We are also calling on technology companies that aid with the transfer of remittances to desist from the predatory fees that are being imposed on international money transfers. The people of Zimbabwe rely on these much needed resources as over 50% of migrants in the diaspora understand that the financial aid sent back home has positive effects on their household’s welfare. With this being acknowledged, our government is condemning the predatory financial burdens that are being put on our citizens in the diaspora and at home.
Finally, our government wants to remind the world and particularly, South Africa of the important part that our great people have played in liberation and development struggles. Our industrious people of “Unity, Freedom, Work” were among those fighting against the oppressive system of apartheid that was existent in South Africa. Therefore, in these rather challenging times as it concerns immigration, the people of Zimbabwe are turning to their proud brothers and sisters across the border in South Africa. We are encouraging the government of South Africa to ensure the fair treatment of our citizens and we are condemning the kind of excessive reactions by South African police forces which took place against Zimbabwean migrants in 2008.

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