At AMUN Black Lives Matter

Position Papers by Committee

Position paper for Commission on the Status of Women


Country:Australia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Global concerns of issues such as the HIV/AIDS epidemic, The Commonwealth of Australia recognizes its effect on women worldwide. The HIV/AIDS epidemic has decreased the stability of women’s lives as globally, women are at a far greater risk of contracting the virus as well as dying as a result of its complications. At present, The Commonwealth of Australia does not experience a drastic number of cases of HIV/AIDS, as according to the Australian Eighth National HIV Strategy 2018-2022, “Australia has one of the lowest rates of new HIV diagnoses among developed countries and HIV transmission through shared injecting equipment and sex work is very low.” However, in the country, HIV/AIDS disproportionately affects the indigenous aboriginal population as according to the National Institute of Health “the HIV incidence among the Aboriginal group was two times higher than the non-Aboriginal group (21% vs. 11%).” The effect in the aborigial communities also affects indigenous women more frequently than it does indigenous men.
Protecting women on a global scale from health and economic disparities that they face starts with education. Educating women on their rights, safe labor practices, sexual education, etc. are a means of providing women with the tools in order to advocate in their communities as the Women in Australia movement has done for decades. United Nations programs such as UN Women and UNGEI have had educational programs to work towards the UN Sustainable Development Goals for 2030, which specifically discusses HIV/AIDS mitigation and education, as well as gender equity and equality for women through economic empowerment.

Country:Australia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
The global influence and work of women throughout history and into the modern day is incredible, though often ignored. Their struggles, such as health and economic disparities are frequently overlooked, but The Commonwealth of Australia has experienced a social and cultural movement called “Women in Australia'' in order to recognize the contributions of Australian women to the nation’s development. As the world of work for women changes it is not a pressing cultural issue in Australia as it maybe in other countries; despite the Sex Discrimination Act of 1984 passing in Australia which banned the discrimination based on sex in “public life, including work, accommodation, education, the provision of goods, facilities and services, the activities of clubs and the administration of Commonwealth laws and programs,” discrimination still persists. While this law protects Australian women from experiencing the effects of unpaid labor whilst employed, the COVID-19 pandemic caused a shift in labor practices. According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), in 2020, women in Australia experienced more job losses or stagnance in salary than their male counterparts. For work in the home, the ABS reports “that 62 percent of women spent five or more hours [per] week on unpaid indoor housework compared with 35 percent of men.” The Australian government also tries to end the stigma of women who choose to be homemakers, who are in fact unpaid for the tiresome labor, and dispel the myth that women who work in the home are draining the economy. Instead, the Commonwealth address the barriers women experience to work such as the cost and limited access to childcare, as well as how on a global scale, many countries do not have the labor protection laws that Australia does, so many women are subjected to choose jobs that may take advantage of women’s labor, but be infrequent with pay or not pay at all, but some women, especially those living in poverty often stay, because they desperately need some sort of stability and believe that some pay is better than none at all.

Country:Bahrain
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
As one of the leading nations in the Middle East in women’s legal empowerment, we recognize that women and girls are most vulnerable to HIV infection due to a lack of women’s healthcare. Building healthcare clinics, run and funded by the United Nations, will provide both a source of treatment for those infected, and preventative information regarding HIV/AIDS so that the most affected populations learn how to better protect themselves. These healthcare clinics will need to be equipped with an adequate number of tests, as frequent and consistent testing will help to catch HIV before it progresses into AIDS. To lower the prevalence of HIV in highly affected nations, the implementation of high-quality healthcare clinics and more testing/treatment options is vital.
The United Nations has a responsibility to oversee the implementation of increased medical resources for women in high-risk regions- especially women’s clinics. Women’s clinics will provide women with a safe and discreet option for healthcare, and can also partner up with independent humanitarian aid organizations to work to bring sexual and reproductive education resources to all- thus lessening the stigma that surrounds the women’s access to medical resources.
Bahrain’s strict laws on HIV have had a huge effect, as Bahrain’s prevalence of HIV sits only at 0.1%. In 2017, our king ratified the Law for the Prevention of Society from Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). This law means that anyone who is found to have mistakenly passed on HIV to someone else will have to spend a year in jail, and will be fined two thousand dinars. Anyone found to have intentionally spread HIV to someone else can spend up to 10 years in prison, and will be fined ten thousand dinars. This national measure of HIV prevention has been shown to be exceptionally effective, and we feel that if other countries adopted similar policies, they too would be successful in diminishing their HIV prevalence.
We recognize the unequal effects of unpaid labor that falls on women worldwide. Women spend up to ten times more time on unpaid care work than men. Uruguay implemented a new policy that provides free childcare for a specific amount of hours and days a week. This helps mitigate the burden of unpaid labor that falls on women. It will also give women more economic independence and support the economy of the country by boosting GDP. This could be a step that the UN takes to encourage countries to implement a similar childcare system to promote gender equality.
The world of work is constantly changing and Bahrain recognizes the issue of an unequal amount of women in jobs that are being replaced by machines. The COVID-19 pandemic which has only made the unequal distribution of unemployment and wages worse. We believe that the United Nations should implement a framework that would provide countries with a system to make sure companies are equally hiring and firing men and women into the workforce. By working to make sure that women not only have jobs now, but can keep them in the future will have a large impact on the progression of gender equality across the globe.
We recognize the struggle that women face against many legal frameworks within countries that restrict access to equal levels of employment. In developing countries women still face laws that don't allow women to own property or severely restrict their access to land and inheritances. This puts women at an extreme disadvantage to try and achieve economic empowerment. Member states in the United Nations can help work to get these laws eliminated by implementing frameworks and action plans that guide countries to women being economically independent. Our country recognizes this issue and our own shortcomings and would like to work to fix this problem.

Country:Bahrain
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
We recognize the unequal effects of unpaid labor that falls on women worldwide. Women spend up to ten times more time on unpaid care work than men. Uruguay implemented a new policy that provides free childcare for a specific amount of hours and days a week. This helps mitigate the burden of unpaid labor that falls on women. It will also give women more economic independence and support the economy of the country by boosting GDP. This could be a step that the United Nations takes to encourage countries to implement a similar childcare system to promote gender equality.
The world of work is constantly changing and Bahrain recognizes the issue of an unequal amount of women in jobs that are being replaced by machines. The COVID-19 pandemic which has only made the unequal distribution of unemployment and wages worse. We believe that the United Nations should implement a framework that would provide countries with a system to make sure companies are equally hiring and firing men and women into the workforce. By working to make sure that women not only have jobs now, but can keep them in the future will have a large impact on the progression of gender equality across the globe.
We recognize the struggle that women face against many legal frameworks within countries that restrict access to equal levels of employment. In developing countries women still face laws that don't allow women to own property or severely restrict their access to land and inheritances. This puts women at an extreme disadvantage to try and achieve economic empowerment. Member states in the United Nations can help work to get these laws eliminated by implementing frameworks and action plans that guide countries to women being economically independent. Our country recognizes this issue and our own shortcomings and would like to work to fix this problem.

Country:Bangladesh
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The People’s Republic of Bangladesh has been dedicated to responding to the HIV/AIDS crisis since the start of the pandemic. Four years before the first documented case of HIV, the government of Bangladesh established the National AIDS Committee (NAC) and developed the first AIDS policy in 1985. As cases continue to rise, the Commission on the Status of Women’s responsibility is to recognize the risk HIV and AIDS still poses to the citizens of Bangladesh. In addition to health issues, HIV and AIDS creates economic and social challenges due to the high infection rates amongst the most productive age range.
Through comprehensive and strategically viable prevention measures, Bangladesh has been more successful than other developing countries in preventing HIV/AIDS. The HIV/AIDS/STD Prevention and Control Program drafted in 1995 had four main objectives: (a) to prevent HIV transmission, (b) to reduce the impact of HIV/AIDS on the individual and the community, (c) to prevent transmission of STDS, and (d) to provide STD management. Substantial efforts were made by the government to implement these policies, however, they have been restrained by the existing stigma of getting tested and inadequate funding. Building upon these policies, the National Strategic Plan for HIV/AIDS 2004-2010 successfully introduced family planning programs that collaborated with schools, communities, and religious programs.
While cases of AIDS remain low, with the virus affecting 0.1% of the general population, cases of HIV are rising. Bangladesh acknowledges the persistent threat of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and is committed to taking immediate action to decrease infection rates. The 4th National Strategic Plan for HIV and AIDS Response 2018-2022 focuses on minimizing the spread of HIV and AIDS through increased testing, universal access to treatment, information system strengthening, and research-based programs.

Country:Bangladesh
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Bangladesh acknowledges the presence of gender-based discrimination and inequality for female workers. Despite efforts made to advance women's position in society, they continue to be both underpaid in the labor market and unrepresented in social, economic, and political spheres. On average, women in Bangladesh are three times more likely than men to engage in informal and non-standard working arrangements, subjecting women to increased risk of poverty, exploitation, and gender-based violence.
In 2016, Bangladesh implemented the Sixth Plan to progress initiatives to remove all societal biases towards women in policies and institutions. The plan expanded upon The National Women Development Policy (NWDP), ratified in 2011 to grant access to equal opportunities and fundamental rights. In 2004, the addition of quotas paved the way for future advancements towards equal representation for women in governmental affairs. The quota required 45 parliament seats to be reserved for women. That number was later increased to 50 parliament seats in 2011, ranking Bangladesh 10th out of 142 countries for women's political empowerment.
In 2015-2016, the labor force participation rate was 81.9 percent for males and 35.6 percent for females. The Sixth Plan aimed to increase female participation by increasing employment opportunities for women. However, despite efforts made by the Sixth Plan, employment rates among women still remain lower than the international standard, and they continue to face discrimination in the labor force as wage and occupational gender gaps persist.
Bangladesh is committed to protecting and promoting women's rights in the workforce as they work towards ending gender-based inequality. The 7th Five Year Plan will support women's advancement as self-sufficient individuals. The plan will enhance women's access to resources and opportunities, change social norms, and minimize discriminatory barriers by establishing monitoring and accountability mechanisms in the labor force.

Country:Canada
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The termination of MDG 5 in 2015 showcased the complexity of HIV/AIDS’s unique causal/consequential relationship among women and girls while signaling for a re-examination of the key barriers in HIV/AIDS’s extinction. The effects of violence, stigma, and a lack of preventative education most strongly impact vulnerable groups of women and girls. Community- specific organizations power the reduction of HIV/AIDS within at-risk populations. In Canada, we are currently creating and funding educational frameworks in HIV/AIDS curriculums, particularly in connection with health initiatives focusing on indigenous women. These alliances with local health partnerships, such as the AIDS Committee of Newfoundland and Labrador, have enlightened the importance of protecting indigenous women against not only HIV/AIDS, but other health concerns and their notable root causes and consequences as well. In this committee, we are eager to push towards sustainable solutions emphasizing the role of local partnerships in eradicating HIV/AIDS beyond our indigenous women communities. Canada firmly believes that stigma primarily blocks the path towards establishing universal access to HIV/AIDS treatment, particularly antiretroviral therapy. As seen through Canadian initiatives, these stigmas can be reduced by developing and funding prenatal HIV testing programs, prevention organizations led by and for sex workers, and supportive environments for HIV-positive women from HIV-endemic nations. Acknowledging the power of community is the first step in reducing stigmas, and, as a delegation committed to the eradication of HIV and AIDS, we are ecstatic to promote this perspective to the Commission on the Status of Women.

Country:Canada
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Across many nations, the status of women’s employment is a storied tale of high risk and low return. In the two decades before 2020, the unemployment rate for women has not dropped back below 5%, and the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated these numbers at a greater margin than the male workforce, making increasingly apparent the need to address the economic risk women face worldwide. Canada has made large strides both domestically and internationally in increasing women’s financial mobility. In Canada, extending education infrastructure funding to childcare alongside the implementation of paid maternity leave has lessened the burden of unpaid labor off of the backs of mothers and increased the number of women propelling their careers through pregnancy. We also acknowledge the advantage that Canadian infrastructure provides in the pursuit of empowering women economically. It is through this understanding that Canada proclaims a feminist international assistance policy with a core focus of eradicating poverty worldwide. Canada is a principal financial partner of the Equal Pay International Coalition, working with private and public development partners to reduce the gender pay gap and introduce technological support systems for the same purpose. Canada believes that before proposing some of our domestic gendered policies to other nations, the blatant legal, social, and cultural barriers between women and economic mobility must be addressed. Through urging nations to remove barriers limiting property rights and individual freedoms while installing legal protections in instances of workplace assault or economic exploitation, the UN’s fifth sustainable development goal can be further realized. Providing funding for the implementation of educational and technological infrastructures for women’s economic development is necessary to ensure the jobs of women in times of future changes to the global workplace.

Country:Chile
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
We continue to work with the United Nations and fellow States to protect Women and Girl Children that are living with HIV and AIDS. Currently, 77,00 women above the age of fifteen are living with HIV and AIDs, and an estimated 90 children are infected per year when they are born due to HIV and AIDS-positive mothers. We have put in place new prenatal policies since 2015 to help to ensure that children born of mothers with HIV/AIDS are less likely to be infected at birth. This program provided services to prevent mothers from infecting their children through an expansion of testing, treatments, and follow-up appointments. We hope to work towards automatically including HIV services with prenatal care to ensure that HIV discrimination towards pregnant women living with HIV/AIDS is irradicated. To help children, we created the Friendly Spaces Program in schools, which provides free and confidential health counseling to children. Furthermore, in order to promote the UN's HIV policies, we are a part of the joint program UNAIDS, to assist in fast-tracking HIV/AIDS response. We were members of the Programme Coordinating Board for UNAIDS for a three-year term, ending in 2020.

Country:Chile
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Chile endorsed women’s leadership in politics through the UNWomen. According to the new Chilean electoral system, women must represent at least forty percent of candidates for Parliament with economic incentives for those who complete the goal. Those who do not attain the benchmark are unable to register their candidates. We aimed to have women direct forty percent of public enterprise and hoped to train 300,000 women for highly skilled jobs. Through the Ministry of Women and Gender Equity, established after Law No. 19.023 was published in 1991, we recognize that women are affected by poverty and remuneration gaps to a greater extent. Additionally, we acknowledge legal discrimination still exists in our legislation and are working to consolidate equality of women before the law. We support allowing women to manage their own assets and companies as well as encouraging their participation in STEM careers and postgraduate courses. To further support women in the workforce, we seek to provide universal childcare for all working mothers and fathers, especially those with children under two years of age. President Pinera proposed a bill in 2018 which would give all children free access to childcare centers and nurseries. In addition, we have established an after-school program that seeks to expand coverage--we estimate this will double the number of w0men who can work. Furthermore, women who are employed can receive a greater subsidy from the government for their families.

Country:China
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Youth in China have limited knowledge in sexual health and are unwilling to openly discuss in public. Over the years it has become evident that one effective way to get the public to speak on the topic is via contests. In 2017 a study was aimed at college students to measure engagement in an innovative open call for sexual health image contest and how that affected discussions on sexual health. The study suggested that non-professional participants became more confident speaking openly about their knowledge on sexual health. Public health campaigns by professionals became more patient-oriented as a result of the contest. Women resort to abortion as a means of birth control for two reasons, not wanting to get pregnant and the two child policy. In the past 20 years China has put efforts into treatment of HIV and AIDS through the National Free Antiretroviral Therapy Program which has put the urgency care label to managing and preventing. In 2019, a “Healthy China Initiatives’ is an eleven year plan to further promote and present comprehensive sexuality education to the public and in school settings. Prior to this, studies supported by the UNESCO and UNFPA have shown that half of girls surveyed from across 30 secondary schools agreed that they should be allowed when and who to marry. Less than half stated that they have no say as to if they are willing to engage in intimacy with their partner- husband. China Family Planning Association is closing the gap of illiteracy through peer education among the youth. There is social opposition due to misconceptions that it may oppose cultural values and the lack of resources to properly have the efforts implemented across provinces. The peer sexual health education program is not just about sex in depth and its implications but it also educates on gender equality, consent and rights to prevent gender-based discrimination, violence, unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions, sexually transmitted infections. AIDS ranks eleventh in incidence rate of infectious diseases but still the deadliest 19 thousand deaths in 2020. A decade prior HIV and AIDS weren’t contracted mostly via sex, but presently as premarital sex is less looked upon sex is top way to contract either.

Country:China
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
In a patriarchal and capitalistic society, gender equality is a prominent concern. Women are often not given the same access to resources as their male counterparts. This has caused global systemic disparities in health, education, wealth, power distribution, etc. The glass ceiling precludes women from being able to obtain positions of power and secure their economic independence. Factors like culture, gender roles, and societal expectations can influence the extent of the glass ceiling. Enhancing economic opportunities for women cultivates the grounds for sustainable development. The People’s Republic of China works to progress the economic empowerment of women by centralizing entrepreneurship, establishing laws to protect women’s rights, and increasing women’s participation in decision-making and management. Western countries have not adequately addressed their ongoing issues regarding gender equality. This is reflected in their continuous disputes about equal pay for men and women, furthermore equal pay for women of color. China is an emerging leader in demonstrating the characteristics of an economically empowering society for women. China believes that providing women with opportunities in entrepreneurship can increase economic growth and sustainability. Recognizing the existing barriers that prevent women from advancing in society, coordination groups and councils have been created to specifically focus on producing a more inclusive environment. The increase in women’s participation in decision-making and management allows for women’s political interests to be heard and the ability to make reformations regarding women’s rights. Through these efforts China will display to other countries the proper measures in supporting women to reach their full potential.

Country:Colombia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Colombia is alarmed by the finding in E/CN.6/2020/6 that HIV/AIDS continues to be the number one cause of death for women of childbearing age, and that there are an estimated 17.8 million women currently living with HIV/AIDS globally. Several factors make women and girls more vulnerable to HIV/AIDS, including stigma around sexual health, and poverty. Stigmatization of HIV/AIDS and sexual health discourages vulnerable populations from seeking treatment and limits access to preventative care and the ability to practice autonomous sexuality. People living in poverty also lack access to preventive care and treatment, and rely more heavily on the sex tourism industry for income, which makes infection 14 times more likely in women. Colombia has intensified our response to this epidemic by joining the UNAIDS de-stigmatization campaign “Hands up for HIV Prevention” in 2016, decriminalizing HIV transmission in 2019 and implementing national policy which focuses on promotion and prevention, comprehensive care, support and social protection, and monitoring and evaluation of the response. Moving forward, we must follow the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Actions guidance to take up a gendered perspective to better understand the scope of the problem and the unique ways that it can be addressed most effectively. We also stress the importance of aid from the international community in effectively tackling the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS, as we have seen great success in programs such as those headed by the AIDS Healthcare Foundation, which works through a Health Provider Institution to provide free comprehensive care and rapid tests to all people living in Colombia. Initiatives such as these are vital to fulfilling the Sustainable Development Goal 3.3, which aims to end epidemics of communicable diseases such as HIV/AIDS by 2030.

Country:Colombia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Colombia is committed to enhancing economic empowerment of women in the changing world of work. Although The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action of 1995 has laid out an empowerment-focused framework to achieve gender equality by 2030, no Member State is on track to do so. Women continue to face discrimination and inequality, remaining underrepresented and underpaid in the labor market as they continue to face a gender pay gap estimated at 23% globally, which has worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to UN Women. With automation on the rise, women are likely to be disproportionately displaced from their jobs. Since the pandemic, cases of unemployment have skyrocketed, and women are facing higher chances of poverty than men. A UN report stated that an estimated 96 million people may succumb to extreme poverty due to COVID, 47 million being women and girls. The International Labor Organization passed GB.306/3/2, stating that education and skill development must be the first economic priority for women, further stating that as new clean energy jobs are created, governments should ensure a transition for women from existing jobs that are disappearing. Colombia has expanded educational resources for women, and now more women than men have enrolled in primary, secondary, and tertiary schools. Consequently, we have seen an increase in the participation of women in our economy from 45% in 2000 to 59% in 2019. This year, Latin American countries have begun participating in the Women Growing Together in the Americas program, as a way to reduce gender gaps and generate more and better employment. The program is dedicated to promoting women entrepreneurship by providing the necessary technology and assistance in financial management to eventually help women achieve better economic opportunities. Currently, around 2,000 women are participating in and benefiting from the program.

Country:Cuba
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
We are currently creating history in the effort to reach an HIV and AIDS free generation. We are in full support of the Global UNAIDS 2021-2026 Strategy: “End Inequalities. End AIDS.” Beginning with the program “Start Free, Stay Free, AIDS Free”, we hope to end the transmission of HIV from mother to infant by enabling women across the globe to use antiretroviral therapy, then continuing with HIV testing and vaccinations for the youth as they enter into the time of their life where they are most at risk for contracting HIV. Young girls and women (15-24) are more vulnerable to HIV infection than boys, according to an UNAIDS press release, factoring in for 22% of all new HIV infections. This is partially due to the alarming rates of sexual violence that women face on a regular basis. We believe sexual health education to be a strong first step in stepping into a new AIDS/HIV free generation, as well as education in self-defense. As a part of the UNAIDS Strategy we believe both consensual sexual protection should be freely distributed as well as new developments in defensive sexual protection. We believe that a necessary step in the Global UNAIDS 2021- 2026 Strategy will be providing protection and support to women located in areas reporting high rates of sexual violence. Providing for both personal health and safety for women across the globe is our goal as we hope to build towards the global eradication of HIV and AIDs.

Country:Cuba
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
As women’s rights around the world are still needing to make progress, we firmly support Women’s Economic Empowerment in the Changing World of Work. Many women throughout the world are unable to work, due to unequal laws, and unequal gendered expectations. We affirm UN efforts to equalize the roles of men and women in the workforce. Furthermore, we would like to see the changing workforce become more accessible to women, and accommodating of other responsibilities that are often placed on women. We also firmly support the idea that women ought to receive equal pay and treatment in the workforce. We affirm the passing of ECOSOC Resolution 2021/52, and support furthering the rights of women and girls through this Resolution, and others similar to it. We fully support the equitable inclusion of women in fields where they are statistically under-represented. We also encourage partnerships between the United Nations, National Governments, Local Governments, and other organizations in support of advancing women’s economic empowerment.

Country:Denmark
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
As of 2020, 37.7 million people across the globe were living with HIV, with 1.5 million of those becoming newly infected that year. As HIV rates continue to rise, women and adolescent girls are hit the hardest, accounting for more than half of these numbers. In order to decrease the rates of HIV/AIDS globally, it is necessary that some prevention and treatment methods are specifically geared towards women and girls. Denmark emphasizes the importance of sexual education programs and family planning services aimed towards women, the use of antiretroviral treatment especially in infected pregnant women, and increased rates of anonymous testing for HIV. Education is the first step in preventing the spread of HIV. We support the funding of comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) programs aimed towards girls. Although this education should be age appropriate, it is vital that girls access stigma- free information about safe sexual practices and testing before becoming sexually active. This funding should also extend to family planning programs that have the goal of informing women and providing them with free, anonymous HIV tests. Anonymity ensures that the shame that often surrounds HIV/AIDS does not prevent women from seeking testing. Women and girls must be aware that they are infected before they can seek treatment. Finally, antiretroviral treatment before and during pregnancy are essential in decreasing mother-to-child HIV transmission (and therefore HIV/AIDS rates as a whole). We strongly advise nations to make testing and antiretroviral treatment widely available, especially in the case of infected pregnant women.

Country:Denmark
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Women’s economic empowerment is integral in increasing overall global stability. Especially within developing nations, economic participation allows women to invest back into their children and the community around them, increasing economic growth. Despite the potential for meaningful contribution to economies, women are disproportionately affected by poverty and job-insecurity. There are several roadblocks in elevating women’s economic status, including discrimination in the professional field, lack of education and childcare, and domestic violence. Denmark promotes anti-discrimination laws that bar employers from making hiring choices based on gender. We also emphasize the importance of education in women’s economic empowerment. Better educated women are more likely to participate in the labor market, earn higher wages, and encourage their children in education, creating a positive cycle. We support the funding of programs that cover school costs (such as transportation and supplies) for low-income areas as well as funding aimed towards building schools in developing nations that provide safe, clean, and inclusive environments. Once women are out of school, they must be physically available to work. When childcare is unavailable and inaccessible, it is often the mother who stays home and takes care of the children. Denmark is in favor of encouraging the provision of childcare for women in the work force. Finally, women need to feel safe in their own homes in order to be able to work. This means decreasing rates of domestic violence against women. Denmark is committed to seeing these rates decrease globally through information campaigns to inform victims, women’s shelters to support and protect them, and firm and clear policies against domestic violence.

Country:Estonia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
In the fight against HIV and AIDS, it is vital to recognize how institutional issues of gender inequality make women and girls particularly vulnerable. Despite significant improvements over the past few decades as a result of the United Nations’ global effort to fight HIV and AIDs, there was an estimated total of 1.6 million people newly infected with HIV in 2016 according to data collected by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. Among people infected between the ages of 15 and 24 in 2016, adolescent girls and young women were over-represented at 59 percent. It is evident that while great progress has been made, we must commit to a larger effort in order to eliminate HIV and AIDS. The prevalence of HIV and AIDS among women and girls is fueled by an intersection of systemic issues, including gender inequality, access to healthcare, and access to education, issues in which women and girls are disproportionately more negatively affected. Violence against women and stigma and discrimination against women with HIV or AIDS compound these issues further.
Our commitment to human rights necessitates a prioritization of the full implementation of human rights for women. In accordance with the Sustainable Development Goals established in 2015, we believe that a global commitment towards addressing issues of gender inequality, such as women’s education and access to healthcare, are essential to addressing the issue of HIV and AIDS among women and girls. We believe that governments must take a more active approach towards addressing these issues of inequality so that the issue of HIV and AIDS, which sits at its crossroads, can be fully resolved. In line with the statements made in Resolution 60/2 in 2016 by the Commission on the Status of Women, we urge the governments of the world to take the necessary action towards expanding women and girls’ access to healthcare and education so that the issue of HIV and AIDS can be remedied at its root causes.

Country:Estonia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Since 2004 when we enacted the Gender Equality act, which prohibits any gender-based discrimination in any area, Estonia has been supporting development co-op projects that address the situation of women or gender equality during the past years. The majority of development co-op projects bring an increase in women’s awareness and other important skills. We understand that things in the world have been pushing for gender equality in a bigger way and we are working extremely hard with everyone in the EU to close the gap.

Country:Germany
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The heart of Germany’s policy in the fight against HIV/AIDS is education and prevention. Sexual abuse, trafficking in women, domestic violence, forced marriages and genital mutilation are the root causes of HIV and AIDS and need a serious attention. In Germany, prevention measures are increasingly being developed for, and in collaboration with, people with a migration background. Modern information technologies, particularly the Internet, are being used more extensively in order to publicize prevention on this important communication platform as well. In the context of the partnership between the public and the private sector, operators of commercial establishments for sexual encounters are also to become involved in prevention work, particularly for men who have sex with men. At the international level, the Federal Government will increasingly gear its policy and projects to improving the economic, social and legal situation of women in developing countries, and to the anchoring of HIV/AIDS education in education and measures relating to sexual health.
A central role will furthermore be played by the support of health system development and the establishment of social security systems in the partner countries. In Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the Federal Government has commitments both on a bilateral basis and in the framework of UNAIDS and WHO. It promotes measures for training multipliers in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, also providing tried-and-tested prevention models with the aim of exchanging. While Germany is still classified pattern I country under the World Health Organization (WHO) standards, meaning most new HIV infections occur in populations at risk, trends within this broad classification are slowly changing. Both the proportion and the absolute number of women reported as newly infected have increased, and account for 20 percent of all new infections. Immigrants and refugees from endemic areas in Asia and Africa now comprise 17 percent of all newly reported infections. In addition, the country's policy of making new drugs available to Germans immediately after they are approved anywhere else in the world has created a healthcare system in which patients have access to a broad array of exciting new treatments. Thus, medical professionals must work to remain abreast of new. Meanwhile, organizations that have been set up to help people live with HIV face increased economic difficulties as new treatments lower morbidity rates. The goal 5 in Germany thrives for: ending all forms of discrimination against women and girls everywhere, eliminate all forms of violence against women in private and public spheres, eliminate harmful practices such as forced marriages, recognition and valuation of unpaid care and domestic work through provision of public services, infrastructure and social protection policies.

Country:Germany
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action was adopted at the Fourth World Conference on Women in 1995 as a comprehensive and visionary agenda for achieving gender equality, the empowerment of women and the realization of human rights for women and girls. It contains a call for the removal of systematic and structural barriers that prevent women and girls from enjoying their human rights across social, economic, political and environmental domains, and policy actions to achieve the vision. States concluded that the redistribution of power and resources between women and men in the public and private spheres was inextricably tied in with the broader goals of achieving equality for all, sustainability and peaceful, inclusive and democratic societies. The vision of Beijing was reaffirmed in 2015, when States adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with human rights and gender equality as core principles and the ambitious aims of eradicating poverty, reducing multiple and intersecting inequalities, addressing climate change, ending conflict and sustaining peace. Building on the Platform for Action, the 2030 Agenda underscores that, for development to be sustainable, its benefits must accrue equally to women and men and that women’s rights will only become a reality in the broader context of efforts to protect the planet and ensure that all people may live in dignity. Women’s participation and leadership in environmental and governance has been supported in 61 percent of states.
To effectively implement the goal five, the government must ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision making in political, economic and public life. It should also put into consideration universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the program of Action and International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents for their review conference. They should also enhance the use of enabling technology, in particular information and communications technology to promote empowerment of women. Lastly it would be appreciable if the government adopt strength in sound policies and enforceable legislation for the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls at all levels.

Country:Ghana
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
AIDS is one of the leading causes of death in Africa and a barrier for women’s economic and social mobility. Having below 2% of its citizens living with HIV and AIDS, Ghana has proven its commitment to stopping the spread of the disease. The United Nations General Assembly Declaration of Commitment on HIV/AIDS (U.N. Doc. A/RES/S-26/2) is supported by Ghana. This document represents a global commitment to enhancing efforts to combat HIV and AIDS in a comprehensive manner. Ghana reaffirms its commitment to the World Health Organization’s guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART). These guidelines encourage countries to adopt a “treat all” policy when it comes to people living with HIV and AIDS. Ghana has mentioned this in its 2016-2020 National HIV/AIDS Strategic Plan. In this strategic plan Ghana urges all nations to provide HIV prevention services and treatment to people living with HIV and AIDS.
The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD) have worked in partnership to advance the response to HIV and AIDS and continue the development of health services across all of Africa. Ghana urges that this be continued and other member states join in support of such efforts. Ghana encourages others to join in support of women’s rights organizations like the Mama Zimbi Foundation (MZF), and its Widows Alliance Network (WANE) network. CAMFED is another organization aimed at tackling regional issues related to women and girls. CAMFED Ghana has recognized the vulnerability of young girls to be pushed into marriage or unsafe work, and has worked to help educate at-risk girls and support marginalized girls to further their schooling. These organizations have been monumental in the efforts to combat HIV and AIDS and the stigma around this disease. Ghana urges capable Member States to continue donating resources and supporting HIV and AIDS related programs. The United States President's Emergency Plan for Emergency Relief (PEPFAR) provides technical assistance to Ghana to help with treatment of people living with HIV and AIDS and education for affected communities. Ghana encourages other states to attempt to make a similar effort for other countries severely affected by HIV and AIDS. Ghana has supported the General Assembly’s 2016 resolution A/RES/70/228 and A/RES/70/266 in an attempt to accelerate the fight against HIV and ending the AIDS epidemic by 2030. Ghana has four nongovernmental organizations that hold consultative status with ECOSOC and are members of the Programme Coordinating Board of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. The four organizations are the Center for Africa development and Progress, the Childlink Foundation, the Global Youth Action Network, and the Junior Chamber International. Ghana requests all African Member States to encourage its local organizations to link with the UN to have a concurrent response to battle HIV and AIDS.

Country:Ghana
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Ghana is dedicated to ending the gender equality gap and promoting women’s economic empowerment. Focused on attacking the inequality in the labor markets and the lack of opportunities for economic growth for women, Ghana stands in support of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. The Ghana Plan for Action for the implementation of the aforementioned document prioritized the advancement of women and gender equality. Ghana supports the UN Women’s Strategic Plan, 2022–2025 because it continues to build on the implementation of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to empower all women and girls. The Republic of Ghana encourages Member States to follow the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals which state all the necessary measures to create a more equitable and efficient world, specifically Goal 5 which seeks to achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. Ghana urges all Member States to re-evaluate their labor laws to ensure that they do not interfere with economic opportunities for women. Ghana petitions for all Member States to have laws protecting labor rights of all people and forbidding sexual harassment, and it makes recommendations to the Security Council to ensure such policies are enforced for its own missions.
Ghana urges the United Nations to continue with financial support to member states' own domestic and regional programs, like the African Women’s Entrepreneurship Program (AWEP) and International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD). IFAD has worked to promote women’s labor market inclusion in West Africa and AWEP has worked to support businesswomen all across sub-Saharan Africa. Iceland, being the frontrunner on the Global Gender Index, has continued to set the standard of what member states should aim to achieve. Because Iceland continues to provide funding through the UN Women National Committee to combat women’s poverty and gender inequality, Ghana applauds Iceland for its great work. Ghana wishes to continue its partnership with UN Women in supporting programs to educate on leadership skills of young women, encourage smallholder farmers to adopt Good Agricultural Practises (GAP), and promote women’s involvement in governance. The COVID-19 pandemic has damaged the progress that has been made. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic extreme poverty globally had been declining. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused massive job losses and loss of livelihood for many women. In Ghana women are at a higher risk of COVID-19 transmission and fatalities. Ghana requests that efforts continue to be made to support projects and programs that aim to build economic stability for underdeveloped states. This includes the Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative and the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI) which are programs by the International Monetary Fund and World Bank to relieve extreme debt burdens. Ghana urges the World Bank to continue to support programs that provide women with economic opportunities and job security.

Country:Iraq
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
HIV and AIDS becomes more prevalent when people do not have the necessary resources to help prevent the spread of these diseases, as well as when they do not have the correct information and education on the topic. For this reason, we feel that to help combat the ongoing crisis a few steps need to be taken. The first of those is that places need access to more medical facilities. People who live in non-urban areas need the same care as everyone else, especially when it comes to distributing resources to those most vulnerable to HIV and AIDS. Building smaller clinics in many communities would allow the necessary resources to be given to those who need it most. Just access to resources like testing and contraception is not enough to reduce the problems with HIV and AIDS. Increasing the education effort about ways HIV and AIDS is spread, as well as ways to prevent it like abstinence would make diseases like this much less stigmatized as it would become more commonly known and understood. Efforts like these can be easy to start at the local level. With just sending in NGOs to start education programs and small clinics in one region, and allowing that to grow and spread overtime, the resources and information given can spread from person to person, and with clinics starting in more places it will start small and grow to bigger more national levels of health and safety.

Country:Iraq
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
With women’s empowerment in the workplace the biggest points of development are to increase opportunities for all. To make sure women have a more staple place in the economic sector of the world they need to have further access to education and independence. Countries should make efforts to allow women to attend higher education along with men, as well as to have equal opportunities for work. Allowing women to have more access to higher education along with more job opportunities would allow for more staying power in their economic development. The more women can get educated the more they can find themselves in more and more important and visible roles. As that happens more, they gain more of a permanent role in the economic sector. While education will play a big role in the economic empowerment of women, legal systems need to be put in place to limit discrimination. If both genders do not have equal rights within the law, how are they supposed to develop equally with the opposing gender. This is the minimum step that should be followed by countries to improve women’s economic standing. Other options include ideas such as paid maternity leave to support mothers who would need to take time off work. Also making sure there are laws in place to ensure workplace environments are safe from harassment and other forms of discrimination are ideal in promoting the economic empowerment of women.

Country:Ireland
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The HIV/AIDS crisis continues to devastate lives all over the world. Effects of this crisis are largely seen in sub-Saharan Africa, and they are highly concentrated on women and the girl child. Globally, young women and girls between the ages of 15 and 24 are twice as likely to contract HIV/AIDS as males; in 2021, 56% of new HIV/AIDS infections in sub-Saharan Africa are female infections. The COVID-19 pandemic rages, and in turn those living with HIV/AIDS, especially females, are even more vulnerable to contract COVID-19. As gender inequality grows regarding infections, so does gender-based violence. Inequalities and violence rob women and girls of fundamental human rights, education, health, economic opportunities., and more. Ireland recognizes these disparities which directly affect the growth of the world and the advancement of gender equality. Ireland supports better sexual and reproductive health resources and education to work toward combating HIV/AIDS through partners like UNAIDS and UNESCO. Ireland’s international development policy, A Better World, supports efforts to prevent HIV/AIDS infections for the party that is furthest behind first: women, girls, transgender females, etc. Ireland also increased its funding to the Global Fund for AIDS by 50% for the current 2020-2021 replenishment period. Ireland invests significantly in Comprehensive Sexuality Education programs in sub-Saharan African regions. Ireland fully endorsed the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action of 1995, and the actions agreed at Beijing are being assimilated into Irish Government policy in a manner appropriate to Irish conditions and supported in other regions of the world, including sub-Saharan Africa. Ireland remains committed to ending HIV and AIDS and supporting gender equality for females.

Country:Ireland
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Ireland maintains a progressive viewpoint on women in economics. Ireland recognizes the injustice that women face in economic empowerment in the workplace. Women continue to be underrepresented and underpaid in the workplace, which has a direct correlation to gender discrimination and inequality. Government officials of Ireland are working tirelessly to empower women and secure gender equality. Ireland’s permanent representative to the United Nations, Ambassador Geraldine Byrne Nason, who acted as the Chair back in 2018 and 2019 stated that, one of their priorities is to aim to ensure that the CSW is instrumental in promoting women and girls’ rights, documenting the reality of their lives throughout the world, and shaping global standards on gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls. However, the Covid19 global pandemic has eagerly halted the efforts in economically empowering women. Covid19 drastically changed the workspace for women. During that time, women had a 19% higher job risk loss than men. Along with this, Ireland is also focused on combating violence against women. In September of 2021, Ambassador Byrne Nason stated at the United Nations Security Council, “The political participation of women, and their protection from violence, go hand in hand. Only by tackling gender inequality, including through the political participation of women, will we be able to root out gender-based violence.” Ireland is clearly committed to finding the routes to cease gender inequality and promote the efforts of continuing to empower women and gender equality for all.

Country:Israel
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Israel is home to the Jerusalem AIDS Project, an organization dedicated to prevention and education of AIDS around the world, which is a cause that Israel supports fully. In Israel, there has been an increase of HIV/AIDS cases in women in recent years, which is a concerning trend. Israel would like to see an open conversation in committee to erase the stigma of HIV/AIDS, so that people, especially women and children, can get proper care and treatment. It is part of Israel’s foundation, as demonstrated in Israel’s Declaration of Independence, to support women’s equal rights, and Israel will continue to work towards a better future for women and girls around the world.

Country:Israel
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Israel identifies itself as a democratic state. The Israeli Declaration of Independence of 1948 states that “The State of Israel… will ensure complete equality of social and political rights to all its inhabitants irrespective of religion, race or sex.” Thus, Israel ensures gender equality and is against discrimination. For example, the fourth prime minister of Israel, Golda Meir, was elected in 1969 and was a woman. Also, according to the World Bank, the labor force participation rate for females in Israel is around 58%. Although there is a huge wage inequality between men and women, the government of Israel has been passing a number of laws to improve the status of women in the workplace.

Country:Japan
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Since the 1980s, over thirty million individuals have died from HIV/AIDS, and girls aged 15-24 are twice as likely to contract the disease than their male counterparts. Additionally, AIDS served as the leading cause of death in 2020 for women aged 15-49. In the past, the UN acknowledged the severity of the crisis through the 1995 Bejing Declaration and Platform for Action. Furthermore, the 2000 Millennium Development Goals aimed to reverse the spread of AIDS by 2015. Currently, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development promises to end AIDS by the end of the decade.
The efforts made by the international community remain admirable but fail to adequately address the issue. Inclusions of AIDS related commitments in past Sustainable Development Goals were unsuccessful in their attempts to reverse the spread of AIDS.
Japan recognizes the gravity of the AIDS crisis, and its egregious impact on young girls. In the past, Japan has supported the work done by the UN and other member states to reduce the spread of HIV and AIDS. In addition, Japan aims to address the crisis domestically. Japan acts as one of the primary financial contributors to several international funds created to address HIV/AIDS. Japan funds AIDS research domestically and contributes to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria as well as the World Health Organization’s fund for the prevention and treatment of AIDS.
Japan recommends the following steps be taken to resolve this problem. First, funding and resources must be allocated to the member states with the highest rates of female cases. Second, funding should aim to address the issue through local initiatives focused on providing preventative information to the most susceptible populations.

Country:Japan
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
The global realities of the workplace suggest a continued trend of discrimination and oppression. A lack of social protection and labor rights further solidify the grim nature of work for women. Additionally, women remain underrepresented and underpaid in comparison to their male counterparts. According to the International Labour Organization, women are paid 20% less than men globally. The UN addressed the workplace discrepancy in the 1979 Convention on the Elimination of All Form of Oppression Against Women. Also, the 1995 Bejing Declaration and Platform for Action acknowledged the negative aspects of the workplace.
Japan acknowledges the disparity in workers' rights and wages. Japan advocates for further opportunities for women on an international level. In the past, Japan has worked with other member states to ensure that progress is being made by the global community. Japan also addresses the issue domestically by setting numerous goals for increasing the percentage of female workers in its workforce. Additionally, Japan has emphasized the importance of female economic power (briefly explain or add on a bit).
The UN’s attempts to create a more equitable workplace environment remain ineffective. Despite discussing the issue at length in 2017, the Commission’s recommendations did not bring about positive change. The international community continues to struggle to promote an inclusive working environment for men and women alike.
Japan urges the following actions be taken to alleviate the inequalities found in the changing world of work. First, member states should follow the lead of Japan by ensuring that their own economies aim for a set percentage of female workers. Second, the international community should respect and uphold the various cultural and personal beliefs of member states and their constituents when offering its recommendations.

Country:Malaysia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The HIV and AIDS epidemic is one that Malaysia, and specifically women and girls in our nation, are extremely familiar with. At times it has become our country’s most serious health and development challenge and we are ranked seventh highest in adult prevalence of HIV/AIDS in Asia, indicating the severity of our nation’s experience. While men still make up the majority of HIV cases (89%) in Malaysia, women and girls with positive status of HIV has been on the rise. More specifically, women and girls are increasingly getting infected with HIV and constitute around 21% of newly infected persons across Malaysia. Despite this alarming reality, our nation has taken significant steps to regulate this health emergency. Measures like the “Code of Practice on Prevention and Management of HIV and AIDS’ which calls for a non- judgmental and non-discriminatory work environment was enacted in 2001. Additionally, mandatory pre-marital HIV testing was also enacted in the same year. We also hold extreme pride in that we became the first country in the Western Pacific region to eliminate mother-to- child transmission of HIV in October 2018. While our country has made great strides in the fight against this pandemic, we fully acknowledge the risk and danger of HIV/AIDS in our country and in our greater Southeast Asian region, as well as the unique risk to women and adolescent girls. We call for greater education and awareness on HIV/AIDS especially within our region and in the Islamic world. We further recommend that enhanced programming is created to address the unique risk HIV/AIDS has on women, new mothers and adolescent girls.

Country:Malaysia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
According to the Internal Displacement Monitoring Center (IDMC), half of the world’s 41 million refugees are women. This data excludes four countries of ten with the largest internally displaced populations due to absence of data and reporting indicating that the actual value is much higher. Malaysia condemns all violence against women. Although violent disruptive conflicts plague many countries, Malaysia does not bear this issue. Malaysia supports the endeavours of the UN through the Gender Action Plan adopted by the Office of Disarmament in 2003 to facilitate collective disarmament.
Malaysia continues to make strides in affording women the opportunities to be active members of peace negotiations, humanitarian planning, and post-conflict peacebuilding through educational and financial support to both the UN and ASEAN. At an international level, Malaysian membership with ASEAN promotes these goals through the Joint Statement on Promoting Women, Peace and Security adopted in 2017 and the current development of a new Regional Plan of Action on Women, Peace and Security for 2021- 2022. While reaffirming Malaysian commitment to the UN’s Women, Peace, and Security Agenda, the Joint Statement recognizes the disparate effects violence has on women both directly and indirectly.
The delegation of Malaysia encourages member states to contribute financially to outreach operations that would be centered around recruiting women for Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration (DDR) programs as registration poses a barrier. With greater input from women, the delegation of Malaysia speculates that roles in peacebuilding will also rise. Support must also extend to each nation’s education sector to fight gender- based norms that pervade individual autonomy. The delegation of Malaysia also asks member states to contribute financially to help more fragile states in this task. Ensuring the safety of women through the eradication of gender-based violence and through disarmament should be a priority for UN member states in this decade.

Country:Mexico
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The eradication of HIV/AIDS infections in women and girls is closely tied to the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) , especially SDGs 3 and 5. This issue is a priority for Mexico, which hosted the International AIDS Society 2019 Conference in addition to its work as part of the UN. In Latin America, infections have increased 21% between 2010 and 2019. Mexico accounts for 3% of the global resource needs for resolving this issue. Globally, 53% of the 37.7 million people living with HIV in 2020 were women, and women accounted for 50% of new infections. 79% of women older than 15 with HIV had access to treatment. Outside of sub-Saharan Africa, key populations accounted for 93% of new infections. People who inject drugs, transgender women, and sex workers are key populations of women and girls at risk for HIV. Internationally, they are at 35, 34, and 26 times the risk for contracting HIV respectively. A 2015 study found that 1 in 4 female Mexican sex workers enter the industry as minors, and are subsequently at 3 times the risk for contracting HIV/AIDS.
Like the Global HIV Prevention Coalition Roadmap for 2020 before it, the UN’s Global AIDS Strategy 2021-2026 emphasizes community-led solutions. Historically, Mexico has had a strong, widely respected core of civil society organizations dedicated to tackling the AIDS crisis (CSOs) which had the trust of and worked closely with key populations. In recent years, Mexico has been working to nationalize those programs to prevent corruption and increase effectiveness. A key challenge has been to implement this transition while preserving the stability of aid and supplies to affected populations. As the Commission on the Status of Women works to resolve this issue, these will continue to be priorities of the Mexican government. We welcome international support and input from affected communities, but emphasize the importance of federal control over the distribution of resources and implementation of programs.

Country:Mexico
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Goal 5, 8, and 10 of the UN Sustainable Goals call for gender equality, decent work and economic growth, and reduced inequalities - all objectives that are key towards ensuring that the work of the Committee on the Status of Women (CSW) is done sustainably. The disparities in the experiences of women across varying economic classes, job types, and legal legitimacy require specific solutions that can work towards ensuring that the needs of many are met. Women and gender minorities across the world experience different relationships to work, and their respective governments offer support that might occasionally be discursive to the intersectionality of their race, class, national origin, field of work, and access to technology. Due to cultural expectations in numerous parts of the world, women are expected to take on a disproportionate amount of household work. This is labor that is not remunerated and can often lead women away from the formal workforce. In many cases, this can lead to financial dependence on the breadwinner of the family, limiting women’s power to make key decisions for themselves and the household. This dependence has only been exacerbated in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic and changes in technological use, further hindering steps towards achieving job security.
In light of such information, the delegation of Mexico offers a two-tiered approach to ensure that this committee can move towards adopting sustainable solutions to these issues. First, Mexico recognizes that unpaid, underpaid, and unrecognized work done primarily by women needs to be legitimized, and that the dynamics and attitudes around such work need to be shifted. Changing definitions of informal labor can work towards ensuring that the CSW and its Member States are capable of enacting appropriate and sustainable change. Second, most policy decisions within countries are enacted with certain economic models and frameworks in mind. The world of gendered economics, while slowly expanding, is key towards ensuring that policy decisions are made with women and gender minorities in mind. With the introduction of gendered economic models in schools and with comprehensive workshops done across relevant policy- makers in Member States, more sustainable decisions in regards to the representation of women in the work-force are likely to be made. The delegation of Mexico looks forward to working with the Member States of the CSW in aiding women’s empowerment in various fields of work.

Country:Mongolia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Mongolia is particularly concerned with the way the HIV/AIDS pandemic has affected women and children. Even though Mongolia has low HIV/AIDS positivity rates, we are still determined to cooperate with the international community to reduce the burden of HIV/AIDS. Our HIV/AIDs prevention program has created campaigns to educate our citizens on HIV, established information centers to distribute up-to-date information on the pandemic, trained more health professionals to treat HIV, and partnered with neighboring states to get their perspectives and potential solutions to this health crisis. Mongolia commends all previous actions taken by the Commission on the Status of Women, and we particularly applaud the Commission's request, highlighted in its 2020 report to the Secretary General, that states integrate gender-responsive approaches and intervention into national HIV strategies and policies. In 2000, the United Nations created the Millennium Development Goals that focus on the severity of the stigma towards women and girls living with HIV/AIDS, and Mongolia would like to see resolutions that further encourage states to implement these goals. Lastly, Mongolia supports the international, regional, and national efforts to extend Option B+ to pregnant women in South and Southeast Asian states. We would like to see similar efforts extended to other regions so that all pregnant women can be treated with Option B+. In conclusion, Mongolia supports large and small scaled efforts to alleviate the burden of HIV/AIDS on women and girls. Mongolia looks forward to cooperating with Member States to implement solutions to this dire health crisis.

Country:Mongolia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Mongolia is strongly in favor of efforts made to reduce inequalities that women face, especially as it relates to the work force. Mongolia is proud of our history as an active participant in international efforts to promote gender equality, such as the adoption of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and participating in the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. After the Beijing Declaration, Mongolia quickly implemented national programs to reflect the values adopted in the Declaration. Mongolia, due to our history, offers a unique experience in our development of becoming a strong advocate for gender equality; Mongolian women are more educated and have lower unemployment rates than Mongolian men. However, despite our extensive national programs/legislation to promote gender equality, women are absent in elite positions. The majority of positions that Mongolian women have in the labor market present the potential to be displaced by automation/technological advancements should they be introduced. Mongolia is concerned by the disproportionate impact women will face as technological advancements enter the labor market. We are further concerned by the lack of gender-specific data that is available regionally. A lack in gender-specific data prevents nations from writing effective legislation and the international community an opportunity to understand the realities of the situation. Therefore, Mongolia will be looking forward to discussions with Member States on how to increase the number of women in upper-level positions/parliament and finding a solution to increase gender-analysis capabilities through possible funding efforts.
After the adoption of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, a new age of work began to take place in resolving many of the gender inequalities that women face. Not long after the adoption of the aforementioned Convention, the international community acted collectively to create the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action working towards gender equality, which has become the cornerstone of the annual discussions within the Committee on the Status of Women since 1996. Gender equality is of great importance to the United Nations, and Mongolia, which is why it has recently become the fifth of the seventeen Sustainable Development Goals. In terms of the changing world of work, women face many gender-specific challenges that significantly impact their ability to participate in the labor force: wage gap, caregiving/unpaid work, lack of parental leave, legal barriers, educational divide, societal/cultural protections, and occupational segregation, etc… The nature of work is changing, automation due to technological advancements are taking away jobs that do not inherently necessitate certain degrees of education/certifications which is further displacing women from the workplace as more jobs like sewing, manufacturing, and service are being eliminated. However, despite this anomaly, we firmly believe there is more work to be done in mending the gap, especially when it comes to increasing the number of women in upper-level positions/parliament. Mongolia is also interested in pursuing funding opportunities or alternative resources to increase gender-analysis capabilities to make more effective regional and international policies moving forward.

Country:Namibia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
For many wealthy countries, the HIV/AIDS epidemic has virtually disappeared with the help of significant advances in treatment methods and tracking technology. Unfortunately, much of the world is yet to see the necessary but oftentimes costly steps being taken to eliminate the transmission and loss of life attributed to this virus. This state of crisis is especially pronounced in Namibia and much of Sub-Saharan Africa. HIV/AIDS remains the leading cause of death in the Namibia today and women and girls are in a vulnerable position. This is because women are disproportionately victims of, sexual violence, social vulnerability, and unequal power relationships. This issue has been brought to the attention of the international community through proposals, declarations, and agendas. Namibia has supported numerous United Nations efforts to help address this problem. The first is the Beijing Declaration which is a resolution that was adopted in 1995 during the Fourth World Conference on Women. Namibia also supported the Sustainable Development Goals that birthed UNAIDS which is leading the global effort to end the crisis by 2030. There is still extensive and aggressive action that is necessary to effectively eliminate this challenge. To tackle the virus and the disparities pronounced by it, Namibia proposes that the global community increase their humanitarian and financial contributions. Namibia invites Member States to implement a more gendered approach to combatting the epidemic, paired with the education of safe sexual practices. Prevention measures need to be considered holistically, with particular focus on pregnant and breastfeeding women and their babies as well as adolescent girls and young women. The international community must invest in expanding tracing programs to ensure HIV-positive breastfeeding women are actively tracked at the local level and verify that HIV-positive mothers are receiving antiviral therapy.

Country:Namibia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
With the rapid rate of technological advances within the last couple of decades, the inequities between male and female laborers have grown. In today’s labor market, women face displacement associated with automation at a disproportionate rate to men. Societal pressure also plays a significant role in women’s struggle in the economy. In many cultures, including in Namibia, women are expected to bear primary responsibility for childcare and domestic tasks in their homes. Due to these expectations, it is often difficult for women to find employment as employers expect commitment and time that can inhibit parents from providing necessary attention and care to their children. Women do outperform men within academic settings but this, unfortunately, has not translated into economic gains. Namibia showed great leadership when the UN Security Council adopted the Landmark Resolution on Women, Peace, and Security which helped to acknowledge and promote women’s roles in international peace and security. The Republic also supported the creation of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women and the UN Global Compact to help address these challenges. Namibia is among the countries that enshrine empowerment of women in its constitution, legal and policy frameworks; recognizing that women have suffered double discrimination in terms of apartheid laws as well as harmful traditional and cultural practices. The National Resettlement Policy of 2001 was adopted to ensure redress of the past injustices and about 41% of women have been resettled. Availability of land has led to women taking part in economic activities for self-sustenance and income generation. Even though there has been significant progress in closing the market opportunity gap in Namibia there is still work to be done. The Republic proposes that basic infrastructure and time-saving technologies must become more accessible to reduce the burden of unpaid domestic work, and potentially encourage greater male participation in these tasks. Next, the perception of education must be changed. The expansion of media campaigns promoting the importance of education to parents, local government, and religious leaders can help prevent children from dropping out of school. Another reform that is required in the education system is monitoring educators to ensure that they meet the qualifications and professional standards that are essential for teaching the youth. Lastly, Namibia advises that the bio-energy industry must promote and implement equal opportunities for men and women in this market as it is one of the greatest sources of economic growth in Namibia and could be a leader in ending these disparities and empowering women.

Country:Nicaragua
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The human immunodeficiency virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome is an extremely pressing global issue and is especially prevalent in our region of Central America. The UN Commission on the Status of Women has passed numerous resolutions on women, the girl child, and HIV/AIDS, including most recently resolution 60/2 in 2016, which recognized the need to intensify the efforts to end the AIDS epidemic and its disproportionate prevalence in women and girls around the world. The Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action of 1995 enforced the involvement of women in processes concerning HIV/AIDS as well as addressed the vulnerability of women and girls to the disease. The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women of 1979 worked to provide member states with methods of national response to HIV/AIDS. The Millennium Development Goal 6 steered to decrease the spread of HIV by the year 2015. The world has exceeded that goal by achieving a 35% reduction in new infection rates, a 41% decrease in AIDS-related deaths, and 15 million people receiving antiretroviral treatment. By the agency of these actions and others taken by the United Nations, the path to eliminating HIV/AIDS globally has become much closer to being attained.
In Nicaragua, HIV is most commonly transmitted through sex workers, escorts, and general unprotected sex. So, along with working towards preventing this disease completely, we are committed to taking actions towards ending prostitution and discouraging unprotected sex nationwide to promote the health and safety of our citizens. HIV is preventable, and as a country, we are willing to do whatever it takes to stop its spread. Women’s health should be a priority of this nation, especially in regards to the spread of HIV, as it is a global health crisis. Fortunately, Nicaragua as a country has a low rate of HIV compared to other nations in the Central American region, and this is likely due to the programs that we have implemented in the past. We established the Nicaraguan AIDS Commission in 1996, which is an intersectoral coordination body that formulates proposals to combat AIDS and HIV and monitors the policies carried out for this purpose. As a country, we have over 150 HIV testing sites that also offer counseling services for those affected. Our citizens have ample resources available to them to prevent this disease and keep themselves informed. We, as a country, have also adopted and supported The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women in 1979 as well as the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action in 1995, which, as previously stated, work towards advancing the care and research available to women worldwide with regards to HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment. By continuing to combine the resources available to the United Nations, the Nicaraguan government, and other intergovernmental organizations internationally, we can take great strides towards ending the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus that progresses to cause acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

Country:Nicaragua
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Women make up half of the world’s population, so it is important that they are actively participating in the economy. The United Nations has historically made many great strides towards achieving this equality. In 1979, the UN adopted The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women, which aims for equality on the basis of sex, particularly in the workplace and in the government, with specific goals regarding the eradication of discrimination of women throughout the employment process and in the workplace, the integration of gender equality in the federal legislation of countries, and ensuring that women have equal access to education, healthcare, employment, and voting rights. In 1995, the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action was adopted by the United Nations in order to fortify women’s rights in nations across the globe. This declaration established a multitude of goals -- notably, women and the economy, the girl child, and women in power and decision making were several areas of focus that sought to give women and girls more anatomy over their financial resolutions. Women’s economic empowerment is a pressing issue as it is a step towards a greater sense of gender equality internationally.
Here in Nicaragua, almost 50% of adult women are active participants in the workforce, helping to grow our national economy. We hope to continue this and empower women to work. To do this, historically, we’ve engaged and cooperated with multiple efforts put forth by the United Nations. In 1979, we adopted The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women. By accepting this convention, we committed ourselves to take a series of measures to end discrimination against women in all forms, including: incorporating the principle of equality of men and women in our legal system, abolishing all discriminatory laws and adopting appropriate ones prohibiting discrimination against women, establishing tribunals and other public institutions to ensure the effective protection of women against discrimination, ensuring elimination of all acts of discrimination against women by persons, organizations or enterprises in Nicaragua. In 1995, we supported the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action to ensure greater equality and opportunities for women and men, girls and boys. We want to ensure that women have a greater sense of equality within the workforce, have the right to employment, and are entitled to acquire and possess their own finances. We believe that these actions are best enforced on the national level, as opposed to the international level, as to best maintain our individual national sovereignty. Additionally, Nicaragua is doing very well at an international level when it comes to gender equality. Currently, our country is ranked number five, the only country outside Scandinavia. We have an 80.9 percent rate of equality between men and women, one of the highest in the world and well above average. It is evident that Nicaragua is quickly advancing towards achieving a sense of gender equality, progress that has yet to be seen in a variety of other areas throughout the developed world.

Country:Peru
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
HIV/AIDS is considered to be an epidemic in Peru, particularly in Lima and Callao where over seventy-seven percent of cases are concentrated. Gender inequality and gender-based violence have certainly impacted women’s and the girl child rights in the context of HIV/AIDS in sub- Saharan Africa, for example, however in Peru, most individuals infected with HIV/AIDS are males. The Economic and Social Council through The Commission on the Status of Women’s sixty-second session follow up to the Fourth World Conference on Women and the twenty-third special session of the General Assembly who has reaffirmed commitment to the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action and the Convention on the Rights of the Child, and the 2016 Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS to Fast-Track achieving ending the HIV and AIDS global epidemic by 2030 is no doubt beneficial and supports HIV/AIDS education and resource provisions. The 2016 Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS is committed to a new focus on women, girls, and gender equality in the face of HIV, investing in women’s leadership, ending all forms of violence and discrimination against women and girls. HIV/AIDS among women and girls can be prevented through education, empowerment, and improved allocation of resources.
The United Nations AIDS reported that 18,000 women over the age of 15 live with HIV, compared to 71,000 men in Peru. HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment in Peru is mainly focused on males which positions women and girls at-risk and living with HIV/AIDS vulnerable. Promoting gender equality in Peru will help encourage women to seek aid and/or HIV testing. Improving education and cultural attitudes will help reduce the stigma attached to women with living with HIV and should simultaneously be included in HIV/AIDS prevention, along with sexual/romantic relationship counseling. UNAIDS’s five main key populations include gay men, men who have sex with men, sex workers, transgender people, and individuals that inject drugs and incarcerated people. Despite the higher prevalence of HIV among males in Peru, heterosexual women must be included as a key population. Generally, heterosexual women contact HIV from their male partners due to their male partners sexual behaviors. Sex education, resources and sexual/romantic relationship counseling may empower women and help promote healthier relationships between genders and in sexual relationships. NGOs often provide ART (antiretroviral) medication, education to women and particularly to poorer women regarding HIV transmission to children. NGOs also provide reduced medication prices through the PAHO Drug Fund. However, testing capacity is negligible in provinces and less than half of received funds are being utilized for UNAIDS’s high risk groups. Community-led educational initiatives, such as the Hablemos Positivo (Let’s Talk Positively) and Soy Clave: de las Comunidades para las Comunidades (I Am Key: from Communities to Communities) should continue to be established but also promoted through funding and provided with an increase capacity to function as access points for providing resources to further reach all people, especially rural and marginalized people. Community-lead initiatives should be supported as they can facilitate grassroots community engagement which can lead to empowered communities and catalyze achieving stronger and more efficient HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment goals.

Country:Peru
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
The United Nations’ adoption of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women in 1979 made it possible for women to hold public office and make choices about their reproductive health and family planning. The convention outlined the rights of women as human beings and workers; however, it failed to enforce and consider methods to ensure that women can become equally involved and respected in government positions and occupations where they should make the same wages as men. In 18 countries, husbands can still prevent their wives from obtaining jobs. Women who find work struggle to make an income because of unfair labor laws and treatment. They currently earn 24% less than men while working in the same fields. Covid-19 has widened the gender gap, making it harder for women to enter the workplace. The rise of unemployment during the pandemic had the greatest impact on women because many, despite being employed outside the home, are still responsible for being the primary care providers for their children.
In 2016, women in Peru spent 39 hours on unpaid housework while men only spent 15. They were the first and most likely to lose their jobs due to global economic crises and the need for additional childcare. While Peru and others currently support women’s entry and greater involvement in the economy, it is difficult for women to advance in society unless they can attain the same financial and technical resources as men. Many women have businesses and stable jobs but cannot get the insurance or financial support that will allow them to thrive in their careers. A lack of women’s education in these areas is also associated with the inability to attain well-paying jobs. Since 2018, the Ministry of Economy and Finance in Peru has incorporated women’s labor goals into the national budget to give women the financial support that they need. Internationally, Peru supports and wants to see local and global programs dedicated to providing women with the monetary and technical capital crucial for political and economic involvement. There is also a need for educational programs that teach women about financial and economic literacy. There is a current need to rebuild economies globally. In 2020, women proved to play a vital role in recovery from the pandemic by working on the frontlines and in their homes. Since restoring the health of all nations is essential to meeting our economic goals, women should do more than fulfill jobs that will help to end the pandemic. Their experiences show that they should be leaders in these efforts. Women leaders can bring light to the impact that gender has had on health and economic issues surrounding Covid-19 and beyond.

Country:Philippines
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Globally, AIDS continues to be the leading cause of death among women and girls of reproductive age. As a country experiencing the steepest rise in HIV infections in the Asia-Pacific region, the Philippines recognizes the urgency of this issue—especially as it concerns women and girls—and is committed to advancing the global fight against HIV and AIDS, in accordance with SDG 3.3 and the Philippine HIV and AIDS Policy Act of 2018. The latest data compiled by UNAIDS reveals that the number of intravenous drug users infected with HIV has dramatically increased in the Philippines in recent years; however, nearly a third of those infected are unaware of both HIV testing sites in their area and their HIV-positive status. Adding to this epidemic is the lack of participation in HIV prevention programs by members of key populations; the limited usage of antiretroviral treatment by those infected; and the failure of individuals within key populations to take advantage of local HIV testing, leading to late diagnoses. Moreover, only 15% of the population aged 15-24 is knowledgeable about HIV and how it is transmitted. The People Living with HIV Stigma Index notes that women affected by HIV remain highly stigmatized, continue to face discrimination and high levels of violence that often go unreported, and have limited access to justice. Calling on UNICEF and the UNDP to enhance gender- and age-sensitive HIV policies, programs, and monitoring and evaluation across the Global South, the Philippines proposes increasing the presence of clinics in vulnerable areas that are youth-friendly, affordable, and confidential. Promoting knowledge of HIV prevention and treatment options on the national level can be done by conducting mass media campaigns to promote testing, and on the local level by implementing gender-inclusive community outreach and mobilization programs led by youth and women. Finally, expanding safe and anonymous HIV test sites that prioritize expansive Pre- and Post-Exposure Prophylaxis services—comprising first aid, counselling, HIV risk assessments, and HIV testing—is key to effectively treating and controlling the spread of HIV.

Country:Philippines
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
The global workforce has undergone several changes in recent years, the most substantial being automation as a replacement for human labor. When given the opportunity, employers will not only choose the technology, but will also choose men over women to take the few remaining jobs. As such, women remain underpaid and undervalued in labor markets, a divide which the COVID-19 pandemic has deepened. The Philippines is not immune to these changes, and is still struggling to find equality for women. Through a collection of initiatives launched by the national government—such as the Gender Equality and Women Empowerment Plan, which is effective partly through the Philippine Development Plan and partly through the Philippine Plan for Gender-Responsive Development—the Philippines is continuously working to achieve gender equality. The Philippines calls on the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) for assistance in implementing the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women and the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action at the regional level. In accordance with relevant Association of Southeast Asian Nations declarations and action plans, the Philippines aims to ensure that there is an inclusive and comprehensive support network not only for Phillipine women in the workforce, but for women globally, and especially for those in the Asia-Pacific region. The Philippines trusts that the CSW will be able to provide it with the personnel and financial support at the national level to advance the status of women in the workforce and make progress towards reaching Sustainable Development Goal 5.

Country:Republic of Korea
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
HIV/AIDS is a serious, life-threatening infection that has ravaged the globe for decades. Member states should refer to RES 26/2 which highlights the highly alarming rates of infection with statistics stating that at the end of the year 2000, an estimated 36.1 million people across the world were infected with HIV/AIDS. UNAIDS reported that the number of infections has increased to 37.6 million cases worldwide in the year 2020. From this data we can conclude that without an intensification of action, the HIV/AIDS epidemic will only worsen. The Republic of Korea calls for increased intervention regarding this issue. As a nation, we have taken steps to address HIV/AIDS in our country and implore other member states to do the same. As part of an educational program by Yonsei university in cooperation with UNAIDS and UNWTO STEP Foundation a children’s book was published that taught kids about HIV/AIDS. We, the Republic of Korea, believe that knowledge is the best weapon in the fight to end this epidemic.
While efforts to treat and prevent HIV/AIDS have certainly improved over the years, this issue is far from resolved. It is important to know which geographical regions have the highest number of infections and understand the factors that exist that contribute to these infection rate numbers. Currently, sub-Saharan Africa has the highest rate of infection of HIV/AIDS. The majority of individuals infected in this region are young females. One of the biggest contributing factors is the oppression of women in these countries. Women in sub-Saharan Africa have restricted financial freedom as employment options are extremely limited and they must rely on their husband or other male family members for money. But despite these high numbers, treatment options are extremely limited, making inhabitants of sub-Saharan Africa positive for HIV/AIDS more likely to succumb to the disease. However, global efforts to combat the HIV/AIDS epidemic have proven successful. The United Nations reported that in 2015, approximately 16 million of infected individuals were receiving antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, efforts to increase education and awareness of HIV/AIDS have shown to be effective as well as expanding access to condoms and HIV testing. A change in attitude toward women and female empowerment, both economically and socially, helps the international fight against HIV/AIDS. Acknowledging the role that the status of women plays in this, it is evident that our initiatives to target the gendered aspect of the epidemic are failing. Women continue to be the most common victim of this disease and it is our duty to intensify our efforts in this regard.
The Republic of Korea supports initiatives to further educate people about HIV/AIDS and how they can protect themselves. Furthermore, we believe that the economic and social empowerment of women is a crucial step in putting an end to this disease. As discussed in the Report of the Expert Group Meeting that took place in Windhoek, Namibia in 2000, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is a matter of human rights. For this reason, we call for an intensification of efforts to improve the status of women, economically and socially. The Republic of Korea believes that regional and local efforts are better suited to respond to the epidemic based on the needs of specific communities in ways that global initiatives cannot. The Republic of Korea suggests that member states implement programs that aim to elevate the status of women, increase funding for HIV/AIDS research, and target the epidemic on a regional and local level.

Country:Republic of Korea
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
In 2019 less than 15% of total early-stage entrepreneurial activity (TEA) was made up of female entrepreneurs in 41 countries monitored. The Republic of Korea has been addressing women’s rights and women’s empowerment for many years. In 1948 the Constitution of the Republic of Korea established women’s rights to employment and education, which were highlighted in an attempt to prohibit discrimination. Additionally the Framework Act on Gender Equality of the Republic of Korea has great significance in advancing gender equality through instituting a system of consideration of policy impacts on women, female-friendly cities, and a family policy strategy in preparation for the reunified Korea in which both men and women could equally participate. The Republic of Korea was able to increase the proportion of women in the workforce from 46 percent in 1980 to 58 percent in 2016. Between 1990 and 2010, the share of women in regular jobs rose from 20 to 40 percent. One of the first UN resolutions to address the issue of women’s economic empowerment was the 1967 Declaration on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women, its 10th article attests every woman’s right to choose to work in any field without having to face limitations or discrimination. In 1979 the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women (UNCSW) affirmed this commitment to the fight against discrimination against women by adopting the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women. The Fourth World Conference on Women adopted the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action which serves as a call to action for governments, civil society organizations, financial institutions, non- governmental organizations (NGOs) and international organizations and demands they increase their efforts to support women in entrepreneurship and encourage increased female participation in entrepreneurial activities. The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development discussed the role of women on the path to sustainable economies around the world and in its outcome document highlighted the importance of female leadership and participation in economic development in order to achieve sustainability. Women’s financial autonomy is part of several of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), such as SDG 1, no poverty, SDG 5, gender equality, as well as SDG 8, decent work and economic growth. By supporting women’s entrepreneurial opportunities, the international community can support women’s financial autonomy and work towards achieving these SDGs. Measures by the international community to improve the conditions for female entrepreneurs especially in rural and remote areas have proven successful in many instances, however continued and extended commitment. The Republic of Korea believes that supporting entrepreneurship among women in rural and remote areas is an important step towards gender equality and away from stereotypes and paves the way toward financial autonomy and equality for women globally. Additionally the Republic of Korea suggests implementing gender sensitive legislation to support women working in the informal economy and build safety nets in order to be prepared for crises such as the coronavirus pandemic. In order to improve the conditions for women who work in the informal sector, increased recognition and supporting policy are necessary. The Republic of Korea suggests Member States should implement policies which introduce family subsidies and improve the affordability of public services such as childcare.

Country:Russian Federation
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
HIV/AIDS has taken the lives of over 30 million people since the start of the pandemic back in the 1980s. Despite of the medical advances that help those infected live as close to normal as possible, the situation regarding HIV/AIDS continues to be grim. AIDS was the leading cause of death for women aged 15 to 49 years as of 2020. HIV/AIDS can be transmitted to anyone through several routes such as intravenous drug use and sexual relations – but women and girls between the ages of 15 and 24 are at a 200% higher risk of becoming infected than their male counterparts. Among the reasons as to why women are so disproportionally affected, is their lack of access to sexual and reproductive health services, as well as dealing with the stigma and violence that often surround sexually transmitted diseases. The United Nations has addressed structural inequalities, gender-based violence and gender norms as setbacks against the fight of HIV/AIDS. Despite the many factors that make this issue complex, the United Nations continues to take actions in addressing the situation. In 200,0, the United Nations adopted the Millennium Development Goals, which set a goal to reserve the spread of HIV/AIDS by 2015. New infections dropped by 40% and access to antiretroviral therapy became accessible to millions by 2013. Currently, the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development address HIV/AIDS through several key targets. Members of States have promised to achieve the end of AIDS by 2030 in the Sustainable Development Goal 3.3. Medical advancements continue to occur in the HIV/AIDS field such as the pre-exposure prophylaxis, and Option B+. With that said, the medical advancements can only go so far if the issues surrounding stigma and gender inequalities are not addressed. The path towards a 2030 with no HIV or aids, needs to be one that work on leading women to resources such as sexual health education, as well as addressing the stigma surrounding HIV/AIDS so that women and girl children can properly access these resources.

Country:Russian Federation
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Throughout the years, women have been under-represented in the labor market. During the early 1900s, women made up about one half of the labor market. As of today, women make up about a little under half of the labor market. Women were given very few job opportunities, but that has evolved over time. Now, women can become doctors and lawyers. It has been very difficult for women to get to where they are now. For example, during some parts of the 19th century, women were banned from entering certain areas of work. Women also had to face discrimination in the field of education. Universities such as Yale did not accept women until 1969. Women were finally able to get an education from a university by the 20th century. However, despite all this progress, men still have the advantage in the labor market. Even to this day, women make less money than men. On average, a woman can make about 68% of what a man makes in the same week for the same job. As well as having a gender gap in pay, women are not receiving high positions as men in the workforce. According to Fortune 500 companies, only 8% of CEOs are female. While there are more females working than in the past, this also creates more problems that women must face today. Women must face the cultural expectations of having to oversee childcare and domestic care while having to maintain a job. Despite all this, there are ways to tackle gender inequality in a workplace. Taking care of a child and working at the same time can take a big toll on a woman. However, having resources available for childcare would be a big help for many of them. Also, some women feel that they don't know where to start when looking to build a stable career. More networking opportunities can help women build the confidence they need to develop their careers. To close the gap of men having more education than women, countries can develop programs for women to have easy access to education. It is very important to address the needs of many women to help empower and further them to attain economic success.

Country:Saudi Arabia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Being a low-HIV-prevalence country, with roughly 1.5 newly detected HIV infections per a hundred thousand people annually, Saudi Arabia plans to continue to stay at a low-HIV-prevalence rate, especially for women. This plan includes increasing access to HIV resources for women and girls, decreasing the stigma surrounding women and girls around sex and creating adaptable policies that can be scaled up and down on different political levels. In order to make HIV resources more readily accessible to the women and girls who are most vulnerable to infection, Saudi Arabia will encourage foreign aid to improve the health care system and will continue to do the same measures of preventing HIV/AIDS. These include providing educational spaces about Islam and promoting Islamic beliefs and morals. Second, in order to decrease the stigma surrounding women and girls’ access to medical resources for sex, we will continue to educate women and girls about the risks behind engaging in sexual activity and promote Islamic morals to decrease premarital sex. Now, this plan proposed by Saudi Arabia can be scaled up to national, regional, and international levels. Saudi Arabia will always encourage Islam above man’s law. However, Saudi Arabia will respect the bounds of state sovereignty and wishes that others will respect Saudi Arabia’s state sovereignty and culture.

Country:Saudi Arabia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Ranked above average by the World Bank in its “Women, Business, and the Law” index, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia believes that it has set a new standard of appropriate women’s economic empowerment for the MENA region and the world. Recently the kingdom has instituted many reforms that afford women more personal and economic freedom, and we have seen women’s workforce participation double in only four years. These reforms included many protections against discrimination in the workplace, including protections for pregnant women and the criminalization of sexual harassment in the workplace. Saudi Arabia has also opened all industries that were formerly closed to women, including dangerous and night shift work, and has removed all former barriers to financial services. We believe that similar reforms can be instituted in other States and that they will also see similar increases in economic empowerment. While Saudi Arabia applauds the fight against HIV/AIDS and the cause of bettering womens’ economic status, we believe first and foremost in the principle of state sovereignty and self-determination. Ideas and ideals from other countries and cultures should not be imported and forced upon a people that do not believe in them. We look forward to thoughtful discussions and fruitful debate on the matters in the coming days of this meeting.

Country:Somalia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
Fellow delegates, as the Delegate from Somalia, I shall start by saying that the issue of HIV/AIDS in Somali women is one that deserves our attention. The rates of HIV infections, among girls aged 14-49 in Somalia, has stayed static for years. 0.1% of this group is positive for HIV and there is no improvement in treating the disease. Therefore, the issue demands action. The data that we have on positivity rates of HIV/AIDS are not even one hundred percent accurate, as a certain stigma exists around any girl or woman who tests positive for the disease. That stigma is not completely unwarranted or unexpected, as Islamic practice discourages any form of premarital sexual activity, especially for women. While an HIV-positive test is not to be commemorated or celebrated, it is still important to make testing and treatment available for the sake of public health. Further, education on the topic of sexual health must be expanded for young girls and women. Again, Islamic jurisprudence does not recommend teaching topics of a sexual nature to women, especially when at a young age. However, education on how HIV is transmitted may be the first step in preventing the spread. HIV is not only sexually transmitted, but can also be spread through contaminated medical tools. This issue has been addressed by the World Health Organization through the creation of the Global Action Plan for Healthy Lives/Well-Being for All. This WHO-sponsored program has provided Somalia with higher-quality medical services. However, the quality of treatment means nothing without widespread testing. Since voluntary testing is so rare among Somali women, it is important that Somali men help lessen the stigma around an HIV-positive status. Further, the rates of gender-based violence on women is extremely high and does not align with Somalia's national values; therefore, Somali men owe it to the women in their lives to abstain from violent outbursts of aggression. These are the tools needed to address the ongoing high rates of HIV among young girls and women in Somalia. I hope that our delegations can work together on addressing such crucial issues in an effort to better the whole of humanity.

Country:Somalia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
Another subject that we would like to bring up regarding the role of women play in the economy and the workforce in Somali. Throughout history, women have always assumed a role of obedience to the male figure in their life. This is because of religious and cultural ideas and practices. They are either excluded from having a voice in formal decisions for themselves, their families, and having ownership in financial matters. The way these practices have remained active is because women lack a role in the decision making process, not just at home but also in a political aspect. The rate of rape, maternal mortality, violance in form of genitalia mutilation, and home abuse have a high rate throughout the counrty. The violence against women is seen more commonly against women who speak out about the traditions and customs they follow, as well as against women in power or who are viewed as leaders. The violence will also be inflicted upon anyone no matter what gender supports their movement. Women in the economical aspect have weak positions in Somali. However, this is changing as they are gaining more employment and economic empowerment. They have expanded into employment and livelihood sectors, which have been traditionally held by men. The way they have managed to retain and gain these positions is because they have been able to bring back income that goes into the household.

Country:South Africa
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
South Africa recognizes that the HIV/AIDS epidemic has had a wide and detrimental impact on the entire world. Not only do we as a country recognize this issue, we empathize with those impacted. Much like our fellow United Nations members, we are also experiencing the detrimental effects of HIV/AIDS. South Africa’s female population has a long history of suffering from the HIV/AIDS epidemic and it is far from over. We as a country have taken necessary steps to educate ourselves and continue research. We have made testing and treatment more accessible and will continue to do so. South Africa decided in May of 2016 to provide treatment to all people living with HIV/AIDS in the country (Unaids.org, 2016). South Africa desires more assistance and support from countries with access to knowledge, resources, and other tools. In relation to the United Nations, we are willing to share found knowledge and resources and ask that other member states would do the same for us. Our hope is to collaborate and work together to find solutions that can dissolve or alleviate the rapid spread of HIV and AIDS everywhere, as well as provide even more resources for all.

Country:South Africa
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
South Africa has made incredible strides towards women’s equality in the workforce in regard to previous years. However, South Africa still has gender inequality when it comes to specific issues such as economic empowerment. We are working towards a better community for our women and girls to thrive economically. Women struggle to work up to higher positions in their professions or are stuck in low-paying professions. We believe that government power and the help of South African men will help prevent disparages from occurring. South Africa encourages women to start their own businesses in order to benefit themselves as well as the economy. Private organizations have formed the Women Economic Assembly to help boost women-owned businesses (South African Government, 2021). Due to the COVID 19 pandemic, women have been greatly affected socially and economically (South African Government, 2021). In order to combat these challenges, we encourage the international community to work together to give women equal opportunities in the work force.

Country:Togo
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
While HIV/AIDS has been substantially reduced throughout the world in recent decades, within certain regions and demographics it is still an ever-present problem. Women and children are in a unique situation regarding HIV/AIDS, as children are potentially susceptible to the disease from their mothers, and women face barriers to care due to the stigmitization of sex as well as lack of education regarding sexual contact with others. Sub-Saharan African nations as a whole face a continued struggle with the prevalence of new cases as well as access to care, causing the HIV/AIDS epidemic to be concentrated in this region. As a nation with one of the highest prevalency rates of HIV/AIDS cases, Togo stands firm in the desire to work to eradicate the disease and minimise its impact. Over the past two decades, Togo has worked tirelessly to decrease the impact of HIV/AIDS on our nation, including educational initiatives, condom distribution, and increased testing. Togo aims to continue to reduce AIDS within the region and meet the 95-95-95 standards set by the UN, working with a wide variety of organizations to achieve this goal, including USAID initiatives, as well as UNAIDs. In oder to achieve this goal, Togo requires increased access to care for individuals living with HIV, increased testing initiatives, and a renewed effort in educuation and sex destigmitization within Togo. Togo is especially in favor of organizations that partner with local activists, ministers, and health organizations to ensure that populations are trusting of resources provided to them, and will utilize them, especially during the global COVID-19 pandemic, where medical resource continue to be scarce Togo looks forward to solutions that prioritize local involvement and work within the region, rather than imposing broad based plans without individuality.

Country:Togo
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
In the changing world of work, women’s economic empowerment continues to increase and improve globally. Women’s economic empowerment is not only essential to the well being of women, it wholly benefits society as women are an integral part of economies and societies. After the implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action, we continue to recognize the challenges regarding women empowerment economically and politically not only worldwide, but also in Togo. With the rise of COVID-19, the Togolese economy significantly stalled in progress and women face a higher risk of job loss and setbacks in economic empowerment. As a state largely economically dependent on agriculture, Togo stands firm in the goals of the UN’s Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Descrimination Against Women (CEDAW), which highlights special concerns for rural working women. In accordance with Article 18 of the CEDAW, we have produced all periodic reports. After this conference, we incorporated gender equality into our constitution and we continue to strive for gender equality. Another major step for Togo was Act 016 of November 1998, which prohibited female genital mutilation. Women’s economic empowerment is not possible without empowerment and protection in every other sphere. We look forward to participating in solutions to continue improving the rights and empowerment of working women. Although no Togolese companies have adopted the UN’s Women’s Empowerment Principles (WEPs), our efforts including facilitating the Women’s Wellness and Empowerment Conference each year show our firm support of the UN’s WEPs. Therefore, Togo is in favor of solutions that will increase the economic empowerment of women in order to strive for equality between men and women worldwide.

Country:Tunisia
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The AIDS epidemic is a global issue that demands global solutions. While there has been admirable progress in the global fight against HIV/AIDS. Tunisia is concerned that the international community did not reach its goals. In less stable and developed regions, global contribution is vital. Ever since the HIV/AIDS epidemic erupted in the 1980’s, Tunisia has contributed to the global fight against the virus. From the beginning, Tunisia has been committed to fighting and eradicating the disease. Tunisia recognizes the importance of sex education in fighting the HIV/AIDS epidemic. This education ought to be given early in life as young women between 15 and 24 are especially vulnerable to infection. We believe that this education should address discrimination and stigma surrounding sex and STDs. While this education should inform boys and girls of respective issues relating to the other gender, women should also be empowered to seek treatment and fight stigma. We believe that proper education is the only way to fight stigma surrounding sex and HIV. We encourage other member states to implement these elements in their education systems. Tunisia also supports strategies for preventing and treating HIV such as pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and option B+. Any strategies for fighting the epidemic ought to be aware of the disproportionate threat to women due to gender discrimination, stigma, and inadequate access to treatment. Through greater global contribution, the United Nations can provide greater education and medical services to the most vulnerable women across the globe. As Mr. Aidi, the representative from Tunisia, stated in A/70/PV.98, Tunisia is committed to working with other member states and the United Nations to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic by 2030 and fast-track the response as declared by the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS.

Country:Tunisia
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
The topic of women’s economic empowerment holds a position of high importance in Tunisia. Some important factors that need to be discussed are equal pay, gender-neutral job evaluation, raising minimum wages, and investing in women's economic empowerment. The loss of this enforcement carries major consequences. UN women is a knowledge broker for gender-based economic policies by providing research such as “the Role of the Care Economy in Promoting Gender Equality”. They also work with partners that reach vulnerable women who work in the informal sector as well as provide support to women-led businesses by providing capacity building and financial grants to support the growth of the business. UN Women works with the Ministry of Women, Family, Children and Seniors and other executive bodies, civil society, elected persons and the youth to leverage Tunisia’s commitment to the Women, Peace and Security agenda in its National Action Plan (NAP) on UN Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325. Tunisia is willing to work with the Commission on the Status of Women in the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations to help mitigate the gender gap in the labor market. The investment in women’s economic empowerment can lead to gender equality, education, and overall economic growth through the entire state. Gender inequality affects economic growth by lowering the average level of human capital which results in a major gap in education. Female education raises the average gross domestic product (GDP), which would include women participating in existing markets. Tunisia is endorsing the National Pension and Social Insurance Fund (CNRPS) and the Social Insurance Fund (CNRPS) for the public sector. These organizations cover old-age, death, family benefits, sickness, accident and occupational disease for both of these sectors.

Country:Turkmenistan
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
There is strong international interest in the prevention of HIV and AIDS which disproportionately affect young women and girls. Turkmenistan has had national programs targeted towards young women and girls for the prevention of STIs since 2000, which include prevention centers in each of our country’s five provinces. These programs focus on education and treatment for citizens and offer prevention tools. Although our country may not be as afflicted with this specific disease as others, many of these methods can be applied to HIV/AIDS. It is also important to address the relationship between an increase in injectable drug usage and the increase of HIV transmissions. Harm reduction programs are a valuable tool in eliminating the spread of disease among those with addictions. The United Nations past action from 2016- called the “Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS: On the Fast Track to Accelerating the Fight against HIV and to Ending the AIDS Epidemic by 2030” aimed to reduce new infections and provide resources to affected individuals. The United Nations needs to revisit this declaration and solidify our decisions on how to pursue this goal. Turkmenistan recommends that we model our international-scale programs after some of the programs in our country that have succeeded. Implementing harm reduction programs and treatment centers in areas with outbreaks of HIV/AIDS is the next step that the United Nations needs to take.

Country:Turkmenistan
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
The issue of women’s economic empowerment is one of great importance to the delegation of Turkmenistan, especially given the impacts increasing economic globalization and technological developments have had on the world of work. Our delegation recognizes that women around the globe face extreme rates of poverty and are underrepresented in leadership roles in politics and the workplace. Specifically, we observe that women make up 70% of the world’s poor, while only occupying 14% of managerial positions, 6% of minister cabinet posts, and less than 11% of the seats in parliaments. Given this, Turkmenistan also acknowledges the important role that women’s economic empowerment plays in achieving sustainable development goals (SDGs) and improving gender equality overall. We support efforts by the international community to advance women’s economic empowerment, including the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) and the Beijing Platform for Action.
In recent years, the delegation of Turkmenistan has placed special emphasis on efforts to improve the economic and social conditions of women domestically. For example, in collaboration with United Nations Women, our delegation signed on to the National Action Plan (NAP) on Gender Equality in 2015. Among other things, the NAP targeted the improvement of educational and professional opportunities for women, indicating Turkmenistan’s commitment to improving women’s economic empowerment in our own country. Despite this recent focus on domestic improvements, our delegation would like to emphasize the importance of international cooperation in understanding and monitoring women’s economic empowerment in the changing work environments around the globe.

Country:United States of America
Topic: Women, the girl child and HIV and AIDS
Paper text:
The United States is committed to working with The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). The United States has established The President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) which has been a response to the HIV and AIDS epidemic that has ravaged the world. Women are disproportionately affected by this illness as highlighted by Security Council Resolution 1983. HIV and AIDS have worsened the lives of countless people and still, to this day, are not taken seriously.
The United States would look favorably upon any resolutions that would provide further efforts to increase education on HIV and AIDS. The United States also would like to highlight Sustainable Development Goal 3.3, which is to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030. At our current trajectory, we will fall well short of this goal. The world needs action, and it needs it now. The United States is fully committed to solving the problem of HIV/AIDS. To do this the global community needs to make a concerted effort, which includes allocation of resources and funds, to solve this crisis.

Country:United States of America
Topic: Women’s economic empowerment in the changing world of work
Paper text:
The United States of America recognizes the need for women’s economic empowerment. When women have more economic opportunities, whole families, communities, and countries are all able to benefit. Noting this, the United States of America would like to call attention to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; in particular Goals 4, 5, 8, and 10. Along with that, the U.S. has continued to build onwards with other efforts such as the U.S. Global Strategy to Empower Adolescent Girls, as well as the U.S. National Action Plan on Women, Security, and Peace.
The United States is a firm believer that the entire world can benefit from empowering women within the economy. A recent executive order was signed in 2021 for creating the White House Gender Policy Council. The United States would like to see other member states pushing to enact more policies within their governments to support and empower girls and women alike. Women have a place in every aspect of society, and to deny them that right would only harm the government that is denying them.

Back to the list of committees

Support AMUN to accelerate the development of future leaders

AMUN is a non-profit that continues to grow with the help from people like you!
DONATE